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Individual Adaptation to Endurance Training Guided by Heart Rate Variability

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Individual Adaptation to Endurance Training Guided by Heart Rate Variability HEIKURA, I.2, VESTERINEN, V.1, MERO, A.2 & NUMMELA, A.1 1Finnish Research Institute for Olympic Sports 2Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyväskylä Introduction. Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects the function of the autonomic nervous system. Therefore, planning daily endurance training based on HRV may provide some advantages compared to predetermined training. This study investigated the effects of an individualized HRV guided training on endurance training adaptation. Methods. Forty recreational endurance runners volunteered. After the base training period, subjects were divided into HRV and traditional (TRAD) groups for the main training period. The HRV group trained according to a 7-day averaged morning RMSSD (square root of the mean squared differences between successive RR intervals), doing high intensity interval training (HIIT) on days when the value was within the individually determined smallest worthwhile change and low intensity training on days when the value fell outside the smallest worthwhile change. The TRAD group trained according to the predetermined training program. Results. The 3000 m velocity improved in HRV (p < 0.01). Also, VO2max (p < 0.05, p < 0.01), maximum velocity (p < 0.01, p < 0.001) and velocities at lactate thresholds two (VLT2) (p < 0.05, p < 0.01) and one (VLT1) (p < 0.05) increased in HRV and all but VLT1 in TRAD. Conclusion. The 3000 m velocity improved in HRV, but not in TRAD although HRV did less HIIT. Thus, the use of HRV in monitoring endurance training adaptation is highly recommended.
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Individual Adaptation
to Endurance Training
Guided by Heart Rate
Variability
HEIKURA, I.2,
VESTERINEN, V.1, MERO, A.2& NUMMELA, A.1
1Research Institute for Olympic Sports, Jyväskylä
2Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of
Jyväskylä
Introduction
Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects
the function of the autonomic
nervous system. Therefore, planning
daily endurance training based on
HRV may provide some advantages
compared to predetermined training.
PURPOSE
This study investigated the effects of
8-week long individualized HRV
guided training program on
endurance training adaptation.
METHODS
Twenty female (age 34.0 ±7.8 yr,
VO2max 48.6 ±4.4 ml/kg/min) and 20
male (age 35.4 ±6.6 yr,VO2max 55.5
±5.3 ml/kg/min) recreational
endurance runners volunteered.
After a 4-week long base training
period subjects were divided into
HRV and traditional (TRAD) groups
for the 8-week long main training
period.
HRV group trained according to a 7-
day averaged morning RMSSD
(RMSSDrollavg) (square root of the
mean squared differences between
successive RR intervals), doing high
intensity interval training (HIIT) on
days when the RMSSDrollavg was
within the individually determined
smallest worthwhile change (SWC)
and low intensity training on days
when the value fell outside the SWC.
15th International Symposium on Exercise Physiology:
Focus on High-Intensity Training and Nutrition
UNIVERSITY OF JYVÄSKYLÄ
2014
DISCUSSION
The V3000m improved in HRV, but not
in TRAD although HRV trained less
HIIT. RMSSDrollavg provides a more
reliable method to assess the
response to training compared to
daily RMSSD which has more day-
to-day variability.
CONCLUSION
The use of HRV in planning daily
endurance training to optimize
training adaptation is highly
recommended
REFERENCES
Kiviniemi, A., Hautala, A., Kinnunen, H., Nissilä, J., Virtanen, P.,
Karjalainen, J. & Tulppo, M. 2010. Daily exercise prescription on
the basis of HR variability among men and women. Medicine &
Science in Sports & Exercise 42 (7), 1355-1363.
Plews, D., Laursen, P., Stanley, J., Kilding, A. & Buchheit, M.
2013b. Training adaptation and heart rate variability in elite
endurance athletes: opening the door to effective monitoring.
Sports Medicine 43 (9), 773-781.
Stanley, J., Peake, J. M. & Buchheit, M. 2013. Cardiac
Parasympathetic Reactivation Following Exercise: Implications for
Training Prescription. Sports Medicine 43 (12), 1259-1277.
.
The TRAD group trained according
to the predetermined training
program, doing 50 %of the training
at high intensity.
RESULTS
The 3000 m velocity (V3000m)
improved in HRV (+2.1 %). VO2max
(+3.7 %, +5.0 %), peak treadmill
velocity (+2.6 %, +2.1 %) and
velocities at lactate thresholds two
(VLT2)(+2.6 %, +1.9 %) and one
(VLT1)(+2.8 %, + 1.0 %) increased in
HRV and all but VLT1in TRAD,
respectively.
Single day RMSSD (-25.3 %) and
RMSSDrollavg (-8.3 %) decreased
from pre to post. The coefficient of
variation for the mean daily RMSSD
was 14.5 %, whereas for the
RMSSDrollavg it was 6.7 %.
FIGURE 1. VO2max (ml/kg/min) at wk5and
wk14 in HRV-group (blue bars) and TRAD-
group (orange bars). Bars represent means,
vertical lines are standard deviations. * p <
0.05,** p < 0.01 significant change from mid
to post.
FIGURE 2. V3000m (km/h) (right) at wk5 and
wk14 in HRV-group (blue bars) and TRAD-
group (orange bars). Bars represent means,
vertical lines are standard deviations. ** p <
0.01 significant change from mid to post.
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