Article

Public transport demand estimation by calibrating the combined trip distribution-mode choice (TDMC) model from passenger counts

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Abstract

The conventional method to estimate the O-D matrices require very large surveys and very expensive. The need for inexpensive methods, which require low-cost data, generally called as 'unconventional method'. The development of techniques for calibrating the trip distribution models from traffic volumes to obtain the O-D matrices is well advanced. However, the previous research still in a burden condition of "All or Nothing" which is not realistic for some congested road networks in urban area. So, the main objective and contribution of this research is the estimation of origin-destination matrices by calibrating the combined gravity with multinomial logit under equilibrium assignment. The estimation methods, namely: Non-Linear-Least-Squares (NLLS) will be used to estimate the parameters of transport demand models. The combined model and its calibration method have been implemented. The model was able to obtain the calibrated parameters which can then be used for forecasting purposes. The advantageous and the applicability of the model are given.

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... Transportation is a system consisting of activity, network, movement, institutional and environment, while urban as a system consisting of the economic, social-political and administrative (Kusbiantoro, 2004). Challenges and problems public transport passengers in Indonesia by (Tamin & Sulistyorini, 2009) them are undisciplined, driver transport owners want the maximum extent by, load passengers as much as possible through the exclusion of the interests of passengers from security and quick and passengers who want public transport available in many with a tariff, cheap fast, safe, and comfortable. ...
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