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Effects of Cosmetics and Their Preservatives on the Growth and Composition of Human Skin Microbiota

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Effects of Cosmetics and Their Preservatives on the Growth and Composition of Human Skin Microbiota

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Abstract

We investigated the growth-inhibitory activities of cosmetics and their preservatives against pathogens and resident skin bacteria. Of the tested cosmetics, preservatives such as parabens, 1,2-hexanediol, phenoxyethanol-contained toner, emulsion, cream and baby cream exhibited potent antibacterial effects against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Parabens, 1,2-hexanediol and phenoxyethanol inhibited the growth of pathogens, as well as skin-resident bacteria such as Staphilococcus epidermidis, Shigella flexneri, Enterobacter aerogenes and so on. The application of a basic cream containing phenoxyethanol to human skin was shown to disturb the skin microbiota: at the phylum level, Proteobacteria increased and at species level, 4P004125_s increased and Propionibacterium humerusii decreased. Based on these findings, parabens, 1,2-hexanediol and phenoxyethanol have antimicrobial activity and cosmetics containing phenoxyethanol may disturb skin microbiota.

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... Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety, SCCS) potwierdził ostatnio bezpieczeństwo fenoksyetanolu -dostępne wyniki badań nie wskazują na toksyczność tego związku, zaś jego działanie drażniące wykazane było tylko w badaniach na zwierzętach w stężeniu 200-krotnie wyższym niż dozwolone u ludzi (1%) [15]. Z drugiej jednak strony, wyniki badań Jeong & Kim wykazały, że kosmetyki zawierające w swoim składzie fenoksyetanol mogą hamować wzrost mikrobioty skóry, co może być szczególnie niekorzystne u osób z problemami dermatologicznymi [16]. Kolejną grupą porównywanych składników były glikole, które w kosmetykach pełnią role humektantów, emulgatorów oraz substancji zwiększających lepkość. ...
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... 16,17 Parabens, particularly propylparaben, exhibited the most potent antimicrobial e ects, followed by phenoxyethanol, against S. epidermis and S. aureus, which were isolated from the skin samples. 20,21 The low e cacy of methylparaben and phenoxyethanol were also seen in S. epidermis and S. aureus of Chinese population. 7 Conserving the homeostasis of the micro ora may prevent skin complications. ...
Article
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Microbiota in healthy skin and in atopic eczema
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Essential oils and herbal extracts as antimicrobial agents in cosmetic emulsion
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A. Herman, A. P. Herman, B. W. Domagalska, and A. Mynarczyk, Essential oils and herbal extracts as antimicrobial agents in cosmetic emulsion, Indian J. Microbiol., 53(2), 232 (2013).
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