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Investigation of a Melissa officinalis special extract on Cognition I: In vitro study on muscarinic properties

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Abstract

Melissa officinalis (L.) leaves, Lemon balm, are used as food and in traditional medicine. The traditional application of Lemon balm focuses on calming and relaxing effects. Modern research has demonstrated new effects of Lemon balm on cognitive health. A Melissa officinalis special extract was used to investigate muscarinic receptor M1 binding properties in the following in vitro experiments. Competitive binding to muscarinic M1 receptor was determined by measuring muscarinic displacement using a human recombinant muscarinic M1 receptor expressed in CHO (Chinese Hamster Ovary cells). As a result, the special Melissa officinalis extract showed muscarinic receptor M1 binding underlining cognitive effects, which might impact the beneficial effects of the extract in different indications for cognition and mental health.

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Chapter
This chapter will present clinical evidence for the efficacy of herbal treatments which address symptoms of anxiety primarily via their effects on cognitive functioning. Brahmi (Bacopa monnieri) Ginkgo (Ginkgo Biloba) Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis) Tea (Camellia sinensis) Sage (Salvia spp.) Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)
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