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Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the similarities and differences of naming patterns in the systems of 15 groups: These were: Biblical, Chinese, Dutch; French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Jewish, Maltese, Māori, Polish; Portuguese, United Kingdom, United States, and Zulu. Fifteen experts described the practices in these groups. This worked out to 47 practices (naming after father, naming after deceased relative, unisex). The total using these practices was 194. To measure the similarity of the 15 systems, all the practices were indexed and correlated. The results indicate that the practices in the United Kingdom are the most shared with other groups, followed by Greek, German, Dutch, American, French, Portuguese, Hungarian, Polish, Chinese, Maltese, Jewish, Zulu, Maori, and Biblical. Thus, the British system is much closer to Greek than to Maori or Biblical. This is a draft of a chapter that has been accepted for publication by The Oxford University Press in the forthcoming book The Oxford Handbook of Names and Naming edited by Carole Hough due for publication January 2016.
... 19 However, Sweden reportedly became the first state in the world to adopt a specific law codifying the right to change one's legal gender in 1972. 20 Since then, many states in Europe and elsewhere followed the 15 I use the term "passing" to refer to situations in which people are perceived as their gender (identity) and without any history of gender transition. For trans persons, passing means that they are read as cis persons. ...
... See: Houbre [17], p. 10; Foucault [12]; Wijffels [30], p. 195-196. 20 Scherpe [23], p. 17. Swiss and Swedish model of granting trans persons the right to change their legal gender either through court decisions or the adoption of legislation. ...
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... Gerritzen 2006). Personal naming practices, on the other hand, still vary greatly between different countries and cultures (Alford 1988;Lawson 2016). Therefore, personal names often convey something about the ethnic, linguistic, religious and other cultural background of their bearers. ...
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Chapter
European imperialism forced Western cultural concepts onto colonised societies which had no choice but to somehow cope with the new living conditions. After independence, not even the fiercest struggle for decolonisation could undo history. Furthermore, in times of postcolonial globalisation, Western cultural patterns are ever more influential. In this regard, names and naming offer a prime opportunity to study the complex, but also dynamic interplay between Western and non-Western cultural practices. With a focus on Tanzanian personal and street naming, this chapter explores the ways in which local and Western ideas interact in shaping naming practices.
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In this article, we build on research arguing that linguistic self-representation on social media can be viewed as a form of face-work and that the strategies employed by users are influenced by both a desire to connect with others and a need to preserve privacy. Drawing on our own analyses of usernames as well as that of others which were conducted as part of a large-scale project investigating usernames in 14 languages (Schlobinski/T. Siever 2018a), we argue that these conflicting goals of wanting to be recognised as an authen­tic member of an in-group while retaining a degree of anonymity are also observable in the choice of username. Online self-naming can thus be viewed as a key practice in the debate of face-work on social media platforms, because names and naming strategies can be stud­ied more readily than broader and more complex aspects, such as stylistic variation or text-image interdependence, while at the same time forming part of these.
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