Article

Effect of jacobson's progressive relaxation and aerobic exercise on menstrual migraine - a case report

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Abstract

Menstrual Migraine most likely occurs on or between 2 days before menstruation and the first 3 days of bleeding. Migraine is usually managed by medication but some patients do not tolerate migraine medication due to potential side effects. Non Pharmacological treatment is an alternative option for the patients. Present case is A 26 year old female, who had complaint of headache during her periods. She was not married and her episodes of headache started two years ago. Which were very severe and disabling. Her headache use to start just two days before her menstrual cycle and used to persists throughout her menstrual cycle. Moderate aerobic training was given in the form of cycling for 30 min with warm up session of 10 min, prior to training and a cool down phase of 5 min in between, thrice a week for twelve weeks followed by Jacobson progressive muscle relaxation. Primary outcome measure was MIDAS (Migraine disability assessment test).There was significant reduction in the frequency and severity of episodes of headaches of the patient as evident from patient's headache diary and MIDAS Score. Exercise may be an option for the prophylactic treatment of migraine in patients who do not benefit from or do not want to take daily medication.

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