ArticlePDF Available
Deadline for material
to be included in the
next issue of Stages:
Larval Fish Conference in
Vienna Next Month
We are very pleased to inform you that 146
participants (53 students!) from 36 countries have
registered for the conference. In all, 151 abstracts
have been submitted.
Thanks to the input of our scientic committee,
we have seven keynote speakers, all are leading
scientists from different elds of research: Edward
Codling, Shaun Killen, Michael Miller, Richard
Nash, Dimitri Pavlov, Kimberly Selkoe, and Su
Sponaugle.
Conrmation of Abstracts: Please check if you
received a formal conrmation of your abstract, oral
and/or poster presentation via e-mail.
Hotels: We recommend that you book your hotel
as soon as possible! There is a strong demand
for rooms in Vienna at this time of year. Our event
management offers a number of selected ne
hotels with a special rate, located near the venue
and also close to the city center.
I am writing my third president’s message to you on a (somewhat rare) sunny
day in Hamburg, sitting in my garden, pondering our section’s impressive past,
active present, and exciting future. I am lled with three emotions: gratitude,
pride, and anticipation. Unfortunately, one of those is considered a deadly sin
– but, let’s not dwell on the negative…but try to accentuate the positive. Let
me briey explain.
Today (when writing this), we are less than three weeks away from our
39th annual Larval Fish Conference in Vienna, Austria! The organizing team, led by Hubert
Keckeis, has created a jam-packed agenda of science immersion and cultural excursion (of
which even the former Austrian Emperor Franz Joseph would be proud). Having spent most
of the summers of my life on the shores of Lake Michigan, I nd the program of this year’s
meeting particularly compelling. Research will be presented on early life history research
conducted in a wide range of aquatic habitats (from lakes, rivers, estuaries, and open ocean
regions - not to mention the studies on catadromous and anadromous species). Fishes are
one of the most successful groups of vertebrates, having colonized habitats from alpine lakes
to the deep ocean and, in all of these habitats, the fate of early life stages is critical to the
persistence of sh populations. Over the course of four days at this year’s meeting, we will
Volume 36, Number 2 June 2015
President’s Message
Oct 2, 2015
ELHS Back Then
10 years ago: ELHS shocked &
saddened by the untimely death
of recently elected President-Elect
Joe Brown.
15 years ago: Bob Hoyt’s massive
Early Life History Bibliography
becomes available online.
20 years ago: Tom Miller takes over
as Newsletter Editor and gives the
newsletter a new look and a new
name: STAGES.
25 years ago: After years of declining
manuscript submissions from
LFCs, the 14th LFC is rst not
to publish proceedings of the
meeting.
35 years ago: Happy Birthday!
ELHS was ofcially sanctioned
35 years ago at the AFS annual
meeting in Louisville, Kentucky.
Darrel Snyder was appointed as
Provisional President.
Inside this issue
President’s Message ............1
News from the Regions ........2
Section Ofcers ....................2
People ..................................5
Upcoming Events .................6
Publications ........................13
Editor’s Ramblings .............16
...continued on p. 15
...continued on p. 14
Lee A. Fuiman, Editor
Newsletter of the
Early Life History Section
of the American Fisheries Society
STAGES
Stages
2AFS - Early Life History Section
Pacic Rim
Region
Akinori Takasuka
Symposium on “Growth–survival
paradigm in early life stages of sh”
in Yokohama (November 2015)
Three years have passed since I
submitted a news article to STAGES
for the rst time (June 2012). At that
time, we reported Japan–Canada
collaboration workshops on growth–
survival paradigm in early stages
of sh (Volume 33, Number 2, p 4.).
Finally, a symposium event on this
topic will come true. Please see the
“Upcoming Events” (p. 6). We will
denitely welcome you.
Ichthyoplankton long-term
monitoring at National Reference
Stations
Ana Laura-Lopez (IMOS),
Anthony Richardson (University of
Queensland), Tim Ward (SARDI),
Kerrie Swadling (University of
Tasmania), Tim Lynch (CSIRO), Paul
van Ruth (SARDI), and Iain Suthers
(University of New South Wales)
A proof-of-concept phase for
monthly ichthyoplankton sampling
has commenced at the National
Reference Station moorings which
are part of Australia’s Integrated
Marine Observing System (IMOS).
The vessels that visit the moorings
for maintenance and calibration are
used for this new project, although
ichthyoplankton monitoring is not yet
ofcially part of IMOS. The project
started sampling at Port Hacking (near
Sydney) and Stradbroke Island (near
Brisbane) stations in September 2014,
followed by Kangaroo Island (near
Adelaide) in October 2014 and Maria
Island (near Hobart) in November
2014. Since then, we have sampled
these stations monthly, when weather
permits, concurrent with the established
National Reference Station sampling
for physical-chemical variables,
phytoplankton and zooplankton.
President
Myron Peck
Institut für Hydrobiologie und
Fischereiwissenschaft
University of Hamburg
myron.peck@uni-hamburg.de
Secretary
Fred Scharf
Department of Biology & Marine Biology
University of North Carolina, Wilmington
scharff@uncw.edu
Treasurer
Jeffrey Buckel
Center for Marine Sciences &
Technology
North Carolina State University
jeffrey_buckel@ncsu.edu
President-Elect
vacant, election pending
Secretary-Elect
vacant, election pending
News from the Regions
Section Ofcers
HELP KEEP
STAGES INTERESTING...
Send us a report of your
research activities.
...continued on p. 4
Composition of sh larvae from Port Hacking, Maria Island, and North Stradbroke
Island since September 2014.
June 2015
3
ELHS website: cmast.ncsu.edu/elhs
Western
Region
Dan Margulies
from: Jeanne Wexler, Inter-
American Tropical Tuna
Commission (IATTC), La Jolla,
California
The Early Life History Group of the
IATTC conducts ecological research on
the reproductive biology and early life
stages of tunas. The group members
are Daniel Margulies, Vernon P.
Scholey, Jeanne B. Wexler, and Maria
S. Stein. The following is a summary of
ongoing comparative research on the
early life histories of Pacic bluen and
yellown tuna.
Comparative growth and survival
studies of yellown (Thunnus
albacares) and Pacic bluen
(Thunnus orientalis) tuna larvae. by
Jeanne Wexler*, Daniel Margulies*,
Maria Stein*, Yang-Su Kim, Tsukasa
Sasaki, Vernon Scholey, Tomoki
Honryo, Angel Guillen, and Susana
Cusatti, Yoshifumi Sawada.
*Wexler, Margulies and Stein are co-
lead authors of the study.
Comparative growth studies of
yellown (Thunnus albacares) (YFT)
and Pacic bluen (Thunnus orientalis)
(PBT) tuna larvae were conducted
between 2011 and 2014 at the IATTC’s
Achotines Laboratory in Panama
and the Kinki University Fishery
Laboratory in Japan as part of a 5-year
research project of the SATREPS
Program (Science and Technology
Research Partnership for Sustainable
Development) funded by JICA (Japan
International Cooperation Agency) and
JST (Japan Science and Technology
Agency). As part of the SATREPS
program, scientists of the IATTC’s
Early Life History Group and KU staff
members completed an ongoing series
of growth experiments with Pacic
bluen and yellown tuna larvae to
compare the survival and growth
potential between the two species after
exposure to a gradient of relatively
low and high mean daily food levels
(170-, 318-, 505-, 2022-, and 3752
prey L-1) of uniformly small prey during
the rst 10 days of feeding and after
exposure to a 2-day delay in feeding
of optimal prey levels. Experiments
were also conducted in 2013 and
2014 to estimate starvation duration
of PBT and YFT larvae reared at water
temperatures between 24°C and 29°C.
These experiments were conducted
from the time of rst feeding until the
time when 100% mortality occurred.
Starvation durations of Pacic bluen and yellown tuna larvae at different water
temperatures.
...continued on p. 3
Northeast
Region
Dave Richardson
from: Ken Able, Rutgers
University Marine Field Station
(RUMFS), Tuckerton, New
Jersey
Our larval sh collection time series
reached a milestone in the last year.
We measured our one millionth larva.
Fittingly, it was a summer ounder
(Paralichthys dentatus) from the night
of January 20, 2014 that was part of
our weekly collections (25+ years at
Little Egg Inlet, New Jersey). This
event is chronicled in the preface of
a new book by Ken Able (Station 119:
From Life Saving to Marine Research,
Down the Shore Publishing, anticipated
publication April May 2015). The
book traces the history of research in
southern New Jersey estuaries from
the late 1800s to the present as viewed
from the eyes of RUMFS. Recently,
(2012-2014) we have expanded the
coverage of our sampling to include
other inlets and thoroughfares in
adjacent Barnegat Bay to evaluate
the spatial variation in larval supply. In
addition, we have begun to determine
connectivity in summer ounder
populations along the east coast of the
U.S. with genetic (led by Malin Pinsky,
Olaf Jensen, and Ken Able from
Rutgers) and otolith microchemistry
(with Joel Fodrie from the University of
North Carolina) techniques on larvae
from our time series at Little Egg Inlet
as well as Roosevelt Inlet in Delaware
Bay, York River in Chesapeake Bay, and
Beaufort Inlet in North Carolina, with
support from Sea Grant programs. §
...continued on p. 4
Stages
4AFS - Early Life History Section
The 85-cm diameter ring net with 500-
µm mesh is towed near-surface at 1.5
knots capturing abundant sh larvae,
sh eggs, and the large zooplankton
that is missed by using the National
Reference Station drop net.
We have begun
sorting and identifying
sh larvae. There
has been a mix of
commercially important
and recreational
species, along with
other sh larvae that are important
ecosystem components (see gure on
p. 2). We have found more species of
sh larvae off North Stradbroke Island,
including important commercial and
recreational species such as trevallies,
tunas, snappers, tailors, atheads
and sweetlips. Off Port Hacking, the
major commercial and recreational
sh larval species we have found
include trevallies, atheads, whitings
and rockcods. Time series of larval
abundance of this species will provide
new insights into the seasonal and inter-
annual dynamics of these species. Off
Maria Island we have found sardine,
jack mackerel, yellow tail scad and
athead.
In this initial 12 months we wish to
resolve the costs and logistics of this
program, and to determine how the
monthly sampling concurs with broader
scale sampling for the larval sardine
monitoring program.
How to identify formalin-preserved
eggs of Japanese jack mackerel
Trachurus japonicus.
Formalin-preserved eggs of
Japanese jack mackerel Trachurus
japonicus have long been considered
difcult to identify. This problem has
been a bottleneck in utilization of
formalin-preserved egg samples taken
by egg and larval surveys in Japan.
Recently, Nishiyama et al. (2014)
provided a practical identication of
Japanese jack mackerel eggs from
formalin-preserved samples based
on morphological characteristics with
validations through DNA sequencing
and a rearing experiment. The
Formalin-preserved egg of Trachurus
japonicus 1 year after xation. Arrow heads
indicate the segmentation of the yolk. Bar:
0.1 mm.
Prey availability has a large inuence
on vital rates (i.e., growth and mortality)
of tuna larvae especially during the
rst week of feeding when larvae
may encounter suboptimal feeding
conditions. Although PBT are temperate
to subtropical and yellown are tropical
to subtropical in their adult life histories,
the early life stages of both species
require warm-water ecosystems
(> 24°C) as nursery grounds, thus
providing a common background for
comparative studies. PBT larvae may
be vulnerable to adverse feeding
conditions given the spatio-temporal
limitations of PBT spawning compared
with that of YFT.
Comparative experiments are
ongoing, but preliminary results
indicate that PBT larvae hatch and
initiate feeding at slightly larger sizes
than YFT. PBT larvae, given their larger
size and greater endogenous energy
reserves, exhibit greater resistance
to starvation at rst-feeding (9-25 h
longer, depending on temperature)
compared to YFT (see gure on p.
3). However, larger size confers no
apparent advantage on Pacic bluen
larvae in terms of
growth (see gure on
right) or survival when
small microzooplankton
prey are the prevalent
forage. YFT larvae
exhibit greater growth
potential and higher
survival when foraging
on small micro-
zooplankton prey.
However, greater size
of PBT larvae may
confer feeding and
growth advantages
when foraging on large
zooplankton prey,
and this hypothesis is
being experimentally
investigated in 2015.
The growth and
survival characteristics
of both species will
be integrated into
models that may be
used to predict pre-
recruit survival based
on measureable
physical and biological
processes. §
Mean specic growth rates in standard length (top panel)
and dry weight (bottom panel) for yellown and Pacic
bluen larvae over a range of mean daily food levels during
the rst 10 days of feeding.
Pacic Rim Region...cont’d from p. 2
...continued on p. 7
Western Region...cont’d from p. 3
June 2015
5
ELHS website: cmast.ncsu.edu/elhs
Joanne Lyczkowski-Shultz
Retires
Joanne Lyczkowski-Shultz retired from the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Lab (NOAA),
National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Mississippi
Laboratories, Pascagoula, Mississippi in January 2015 after
23 years of Federal service.
Joanne was born in upstate New York, near Lake Erie in
1947. She received a B.S. degree in Biology from the State
University of New York at Buffalo in 1979. She went on to
receive her M.S. degree in Marine Science from the College
of William and Mary in Virginia in 1971, conducting her
research at the Graduate School of Marine Science, Virginia
Institute of Marine Science (VIMS). Joanne received her
Ph.D. in Oceanography from the University of Maine, Orono,
in 1980. Her dissertation research was a comparison of the
early life history of ve species of marine sculpins (Cottidae),
which emphasized a comparison of larval diets.
A colleague of Sally Leonard Richardson, Joanne worked
with Sally as a Research Associate at Oregon State
University then moved to Mississippi to work at the Gulf
Coast Research Laboratory and the University of Southern
Mississippi, before joining NOAA.
At the Pascagoula Lab, Joanne served as a Supervisory
Research Fisheries Biologist. She was Leader of the
SEAMAP (Southeastern Area Monitoring and Program)
Plankton Team. She served as the Southeast Fisheries
Science Center (NMFS) representative to the Poland and the
United States of America Joint Fisheries Ecology Program
Advisory Committee. In this capacity, Joanne visited the
Zaklad Sortowania Oznaczania Planktonu (ZSIOP), the
Polish Sorting Center, to coordinate larval sh taxonomy
for the Southeast Fisheries Center with her close Polish
colleagues.
Throughout her career, Joanne’s research focused on the
early life history of shes. After her dissertation research,
much of her work was in the taxonomy of larval marine
shes, but she also thought about the application of larval
sh characters to systematic relationships and to sheries
science. An example of Joanne’s productivity in larval sh
taxonomy is her contributions to W. J. Richard’s “Early
Stages of Marine Fishes: An Identication Guide for the
Western Central North Atlantic” (2006). Joanne authored 12
chapters and co-authored 5 others, including an introduction
of the larvae of the order Pleuronectiformes, chapters on
the three pleuronectiform families, and chapters on 14
other families unrelated to the pleuronectiforms. In recent
years, Joanne added process-oriented papers on larval sh
ecology and distribution to her repertoire.
Joanne was a naturalist, a lover of both plants and animals.
As a natural historian, a story of Joanne’s fascination with
birds comes to mind. While at sea looking for spawning areas
for blue-n tuna (and other scombrids) in the northern and
central Gulf of Mexico, a cattle egret happened aboard
NOAA Ship Chapman one evening, and stayed aboard
for several days. For birds that normally inhabit terrestrial
habitats to come aboard ships at sea far from land is not
entirely uncommon as they occasionally do so following
migratory routes, but for an obviously vagabond, terrestrial
bird to remain onboard for any length of time, is unusual.
Joanne determined that the cattle egret was dehydrated and
disoriented, as well as hungry, and probably displaced. She
adopted the bird, providing it with Gatorade and food from
the galley, and even brought the bird into the “Chief Scientist”
cabin, which she occupied, at night, much to the amusement
of both the ship’s crew as well as the scientic party. She
saved the bird, which she named it “Wilbert” (the given name
of NOAA Ship Chapman’s namesake), and released it when
we returned to port, two weeks later.
A member of the Early Life History Section, Joanne
gave the keynote address at the 30th annual Larval Fish
Conference in Lake Placid, New York. Her talk was on the
role of larval sh surveys in stock assessment.
Joanne retires to her home in Ocean Spring, Mississippi,
to tend her garden, and pursue her other avocations,
though time will be split with her other home in Arkansas. §
— Jeff Govoni
ELHS Historian
People
Joanne Lyczkowski-Shultz is seemingly never without
a smile. Photo from www.digitalplankton.lsu.edu/
django/planktonarchive/col/people
Stages
6AFS - Early Life History Section
Growth-Survival Symposium
in Yokohama, Japan
A symposium on “Growth–survival paradigm in early life
stages of sh: Controversy, synthesis, and multidisciplinary
approach” will be held in Yokohama, Japan, November
9–11, 2015. Registration is now open. We are also accepting
contributed papers. The symposium will focus on growth
and survival, but the poster session will welcome a broader
range of topics on early life biology of shes. Please check
the website (cse.fra.affrc.go.jp/takasuka/gsp) for details.
Symposium website: We will look forward to seeing you in
Yokohama this autumn.
Organizers: Akinori Takasuka,
Dominique Robert, Jun Shoji, and
Pascal Sirois (Japan–Canada
collaboration team).
Summary of the symposium:
An open-style symposium and
a workshop (invited participants
only) will be held to challenge
fundamental issues on the
“growth–survival” paradigm in
early life stages of shes, which
postulates that larger and/or
faster-growing individuals are
more likely to survive than smaller
and/or slower-growing conspecics. The “growth–survival”
paradigm has been given much attention in studies on
recruitment dynamics of shes. Indeed, numerous studies
have tested the paradigm during the last quarter century.
However, that growing body of literature has revealed
contradictory evidence from eld, laboratory, and modeling
studies across systems and taxa. The objectives of the
present symposium/workshop are (1) extracting controversial
issues on the paradigm (controversy), (2) proposing ideas
for reconciling and synthesizing contradictory results
based on different perspectives from different study groups
(synthesis), and (3) promoting a collaborative framework
for eld, laboratory, and modeling studies (multidisciplinary
approach). The symposium is mainly constructed of oral
presentations from invited speakers, although relevant
contributed presentations may also be accepted. The goal
of the subsequent workshop is to produce manuscripts
for publication from the discussion of key topics. Overall,
we aim to improve our understanding of growth–survival
relationships in order to facilitate the prediction of recruitment
dynamics through numerical modeling. §
Larval Fish Workshop at the
Virginia Institute of Marine
Science
The Virginia Institute of Marine Science Nunnally
Ichthyology Collection in Gloucester Point, VA, is home to
a large ichthyoplantkton collection. This collection contains
samples from the tropical and northern Pacic Ocean, the
Southern Ocean, the Amazon Plume, Sargasso Sea, the
Caribbean, the Mid- and South Atlantic Bights, and the
Chesapeake Bay. As part of our current NSF CSBR grant,
we are hosting a larval sh workshop from October 5-16,
2015. Goals of the workshop include: 1) how to sort and
identify larval shes; 2) preparation, storage, and curation of
larval sh collections; and 3) imaging techniques for larval
shes.
The workshop
is open to
students,
collections
managers,
curators, and
other museum
and research
professionals.
The focus of
the rst week
of the workshop
will be on
mesopelagic samples collected in subtropical Hawaiian
waters and the subarctic North Pacic. The second week
will focus on samples from the western tropical Atlantic in
and adjacent to the Amazon River plume. Participants will
sort and identify ichthyoplankton samples to the family level
under the guidance of four expert taxonomists: Drs. Jeff Leis
(University of Tasmania), Ann Matarese (Alaska Fisheries
Science Center, NOAA), Nalani Schnell (Muséum National
d’Histoire Naturelle), and G. David Johnson (Smithsonian
Institution).
If interested please contact Dr. Peter Konstantinidis
(peterk@vims.edu) for an application form, or you can
download one from the VIMS Nunnally Ichthyology Collection
website: www.vims.edu/research/facilities/shcollection.
Applicants can attend both weeks of the workshop or either
the rst or second week. However, preference will be given
to individuals that are able to attend both weeks. Applications
are due on August 1, 2015 and a notication of acceptance
will be made by August 15, 2015. §
June 2015
7
ELHS website: cmast.ncsu.edu/elhs
Support the EHLS Wherever
You Are!
The challenge is on. Show us you in your ELHS, “Early
Life is Good” t-shirt and we’ll show you off. Best photo wins
a 2015 version of our shirt. The 2014 style is still available in
either women’s short-sleeve (sizes L, XL; color: blackberry
see photo) or men’s/unisex cut (S, M, XL in navy) with a
few men’s long-sleeve (S only; charcoal – see photo in Oct
2014 STAGES, p. 7). Any one is yours for a $20 donation to
the ELHS. Get one for your students, friends, or yourself
onesie version available – all are great recruiting tools!
Contact Chris Chambers for details (chris.chambers@
noaa.gov). All proceeds beyond cost go to support ELHS
Student Activities. §
Tips for Successful Grant
Writing
The newly formed Early Career Committee (ECC) of
the Early Life History Section is hosting a short workshop
at this year’s Larval Fish Conference in Vienna. Based on
the results we received from the short survey we circulated
in March; the theme of this short workshop is advice for
successful grant writing. In addition to focusing on grant
writing, this workshop will also cover writing techniques for
non-native English speakers that can be applied generally
to scientic writing. We will also be providing additional
information regarding potential funding sources, especially
for travel and research supplies, within the European Union
and North America.
The workshop will be hosted by the ECC members,
Alison Deary, Matthias Paulsen, and David Costalago,
with Dr. Myron Peck providing additional expertise and
suggestions. The workshop will be held on Wednesday
July 15th in the early evening after the oral sessions have
nished and will last approximately 1.5 hours. Please
refer to the conference schedule during the meeting for
the specic time and location of the workshop. This event
is open to all interested individuals and we look forward to
seeing you in Vienna in July! §
— Alison Deary and ECC
Early Life is Good circles the globe. Our ELHS members and
supporters Paula Pattrick, South Africa Institute for
Aquatic Biodiversity, and Karen Chan, Honk Kong
University of Science and Technology. Game on!
diagnostic characteristic for identication was the egg
diameter and the segmentation of the yolk, which was
maintained in formalin-preserved samples even long after
xation (see photo on p. 4).
Nishiyama et al. (2014) received the 2014 Award of
Excellence for Scientic Papers from the Japanese Society
of Fisheries Science on March 29, 2015. A photo of he
occasion is shown below. The paper was highly evaluated
for its potential contribution to the stock assessment of
Japanese jack mackerel.
Reference
Nishiyama, M., Saito, M., Sanada, Y., Onoue, S., Takasuka, A.,
and Oozeki, Y. (2014) Revisiting morphological identication
of Japanese jack mackerel Trachurus
japonicus eggs preserved in formalin. Fisheries
Science, 80:517–529. §
Masato Nishiyama (right, rst author) and
Mami Saito (left, co-author) showing the award
certicate at the ceremony of the Japanese
Society of Fisheries Science in Tokyo on March
29, 2015.
Pacic Rim Region...cont’d from p. 4
Stages
8AFS - Early Life History Section
39th Annual Larval Fish Conference Program
Oral presentations
Session 1: Dispersal and Early Life History of Early
Stages in Rivers
THE DISTRIBUTION OF FLATFISH LARVAE IN RELATION
TO VARIABLE OCEANOGRAPHIC CONDITIONS
DURING THREE CRUISES ALONG THE NORTEHRN
NSW COAST OF AUSTRALIA. - Tony Miskiewicz
(Australia)
OTOLITH CHEMISTRY TO IDENTIFY SOURCES OF
LARVAL YELLOW PERCH PRODUCTION AND GUIDE
THE CONSERVATION OF THEIR ESSENTIAL HABITATS
IN A FLUVIAL LAKE. - Pascal Sirois (Canada)
EARLY-LIFE HISTORY PRODUCTIVITY LANDSCAPES
IN A LARGE HETEROGENOUS RIVER SYSTEM (ST.
LAWRENCE, CANADA-US). - Frederic Lecomte (Canada)
THE DRIFT OF EARLY LIFE STAGES OF PERCIDAE AND
GOBIIDAE IN THE AUSTRIAN DANUBE. - David Ramler
(Austria)
FISH SPAWNING DOWNSTREAM OF IGUAÇU FALLS
- IGUAÇU NATIONAL PARK: SEASONAL AND
LONGITUDINAL VARIATIONS OF EARLY STAGES. -
Maristela Makrakis (Brazil)
IMPORTANCE OF HIGH AND LOW FLOWS FOR RIVERINE
FISH SPAWNING IN THE WET-DRY TROPICS OF
NORTHERN AUSTRALIA. - Alison King (Australia)
THE BIOCHEMICAL PRECONDITIONS OF
INTRAPOPULATION DIFFERENTIATION OF YOUNG
FISH OF ATLANTIC SALMON SALMO SALAR L. - Nina
N. Nemova (Russian Fed.)
BIOLOGY OF LAMPREY DURING ITS LARVAL STAGE. -
Dmitry S. Pavlov (Russian Fed.)
COMPARATIVE PATTERN OF FISH LARVAE DRIFT IN
THE DANUBE IN VIENNA. - Paul Meulenbroek (Austria)
IMPACT OF WATER OBSTACLES ON MIGRATING EELS:
INSIGHTS FROM TRANSCRIPTOME AND BEHAVIORAL
ANALYSES.. - Tomasz Podgorniak (France)
TEMPORAL-SPATIAL PATTERN OF LARVAL FISH
ASSEMBLAGE IN THE LOWER REACH OF THE
YANGTZE RIVER: POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF RIVER-
LAKE CONNECTIVITY AND TIDAL INTRUSION. - Fei
Cheng (China)
AMBITIOUS AMPHIDROMY: USING OTOLITH
MICROCHEMISTRY TO DETERMINE THE NATAL
SOURCE OF WHITEBAIT. - Mike Hickford (New Zealand)
SPACIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF
DOWNSTREAM MIGRATION OF AMPHIDROMOUS
GOBIES FREE EMBRYOS. - Raphaël Lagarde (France)
DRIFT OF FISH LARVAE IN THE RHINE BEFORE AND
AFTER THE GOBY INVASION. - Jost Borcherding
(Germany)
DOWNSTREAM MIGRATION AND MECHANISMS OF
DISPERSAL OF YOUNG FISH IN RIVERS.. - Dmitrii
Pavlov (Russian Fed.)
INTEGRATING LIFE HISTORY THEORY AND DISPERSAL
IN RIVERINE FISHES. - Paul Humphries (Australia)
EARLY ONTOGENESIS OF EUROPEAN SMELT (OSMERUS
EPERLANUS) IN VARIABLE ENVIRONMENTS. - Timo
Arula (Estonia)
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LARVAL FISH
STRUCTURE AND ENVIRONMENT CHANGE IN THE
EAST CHINA SEA. - Yichen Wang (Taiwan)
Session 2: Particle Tracing, Hydrodynamic Models and
Dispersal of Fish Larvae
VALIDATION OF HYDRODYNAMIC OCEAN MODELS
USING EMPIRICAL DATA FOR THE PURPOSE OF
LARVAL DISPERSAL MODELLING. - Roxana Vasile
(Australia)
MODELLING ANCHOVY LARVAL GROWTH, SURVIVAL
AND VERTICAL MIGRATION PATTERNS IN DIFFERENT
AREAS OF THE BAY OF BISCAY. - Agurtzane Urtizbera
(Spain)
EVALUATING SURFACE TRANSPORT PREDICTIONS OF
ALTERNATIVE OCEAN-ATMOSPHERE MODELS USING
SURFACE DRIFTERS IN THE BELIZEAN BARRIER
REEF. - David Lindo-Atichati (USA)
THE DESIGN OF AN INDIVIDUAL BASED LARVAL
MODEL (ILAM) RELIANT ON MOVEMENT PATTERNS
AND BIASED RANDOM WALK TO ACCOUNT FOR
RHEOREACTION WITHIN RIVERINE ECOSYSTEMS. -
Martin Glas (Austria)
CONNECTING SURVEY DATA IN SPACE AND TIME:
MODELLING BEYOND PASSIVE DRIFT!. - Marc Hufnagl
(Germany)
CORAL DIVERSITY AS A KEY FACTOR IN REEF FISH
LARVAL DISPERSION AND SETTLEMENT. - Romain
Chaput (USA)
IS COASTAL COD (GADUS MORHUA) RECRUITMENT
STRUCTURED WITHIN HYDRODYNAMIC
PROVINCES?. - Mats Huserbraten (Norway)
INTERACTION BETWEEN SPAWNING HABITAT AND
COASTALLY STEERED CIRCULATION REGULATE
LARVAL FISH RETENTION IN A TEMPERATE BAY. -
Itziar Alvarez (Spain)
TRANSPORT MECHANISMS IN THE LARVAL MIGRATION
OF JAPANESE SPINY LOBSTER. - Yoichi Miyake (Japan)
USING PLANKTON AGGREGATIONS TO UNDERSTAND
OIL DISTRIBUTION IN NEARSHORE RIVER-
DOMINATED ECOSYSTEMS IN THE NORTHERN GULF
OF MEXICO. - Alison L. Deary (USA)
...continued on p. 9
June 2015
9
ELHS website: cmast.ncsu.edu/elhs
CALIBRATION OF A SOLE LARVAL TRANSPORT MODEL
USING ICES SURVEY ASSESSEMENTS. - Leo Barbut
(Belgium)
SARDINE EGG AND LARVAE DISTRIBUTIONS OVER THE
ATLANTIC IBERIAN SHELF. - Maria Angelico (Portugal)
Session 3: Larval dispersal and population connectivity
- genetic approaches to ecological problems
NOT FINDING NEMO: LIMITED REEF-SCALE RETENTION
IN CORAL REEFF FISH. - Michael Berumen (Saudi Arab)
PREFERENTIAL HABITATS OF SPAWNING AND
GENETIC FLOW OF PROCHILODUS LINEATUS IN
A NEOTROPICAL REGULATED RIVER. - Maristela
Makrakis (Brazil)
DISPERSAL IN PUGET SOUND BROWN ROCKFISH
(SEBASTES AURICULATUS) FROM GENETIC
PARENTAL IDENTIFICATION AND OCEANOGRAPHIC
MODELS. - Lorenz Hauser (USA)
PELAGIC LARVAL DURATIONS AND RECRUITMENT
PATTERNS OF CORAL REEF FISHES IN THE
ENVIRONMENTAL GRADIENT OF THE RED SEA. -
Vanessa S N Robitzch (Saudi Arab)
LINKING LARVAL TRAITS AND GENETIC TRAITS:
PERSPECTIVE FROM HAWAIIAN REEFS. - Kimberly
Selkoe (USA)
HIGH INTERANNUAL VARIABILITY IN THE GENETIC
POOL OF A TEMPERATE CLINGFISH (LEPADOGASTER
LEPADOGASTER, BONNATERRE (1788). - Maria Klein
(Portugal)
OCEANOGRAPHY AND LIFE HISTORY PREDICT
CONTRASTING LARVAL DISPERSAL AND GENETIC
POPULATION STRUCTURE IN TWO ANTARCTIC FISH
SPECIES. - Emma Young (United Kingdom)
NOVEL, HIGH-THROUGHPUT DNA BARCODING OF
THE ICHTHYOPLANKTON OF THE GULF OF AQABA
PROVIDE NEW INSIGHTS INTO THE ECOLOGY OF
CORAL-REEF FISHES. - Naama Kimmerling (Israel)
MURRAY COD LARVAL DRIFT IN AN UPLAND RIVER. -
Alan Couch (Australia)
PATTERNS AND PREDICTORS OF SPATIAL GENETIC
STRUCTURE WITHIN A CORAL REEF FISH
METAPOPULATION. - Cassidy D'Aloia (USA)
A COMPLETE MARINE LARVAL DISPERSAL KERNEL. -
Peter Buston (USA)
SEASONAL OCCURRENCE AND RECRUITMENT OF
THE LARVAL FISH OF THE THREE MUGIL CEPHALUS
CRYPTIC SPECIES IN TAIWAN. - Kang-Ning Shen
(Taiwan)
SELF-RECRUITMENT VERSUS LARVAL DISPERSAL
BETWEEN POPULATIONS OF SKUNK CLOWNFISH
AROUND UNGUJA ISLAND, ZANZIBAR. - Filip Huyghe
(Belgium)
SPATIAL GENETIC STRUCTURE IN THE SADDLE
SEABREAM (OBLADA MELANURA, [LINNAEUS,
1758]) SUGGESTS MULTI-SCALED PATTERNS
OF CONNECTIVITY BETWEEN PROTECTED
AND UNPROTECTED AREAS IN THE WESTERN
MEDITERRANEAN SEA. - Antonio Calò (Spain)
IDENTIFICATION, SPATIOTEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION
AND GENETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF GREY
MULLET FRY IN TUNISIAN RESERVOIRS. - Sami Mili
(Tunisia)
Session 4: "The secret life of larvae" - individual life
history and fate from otolith studies
NATAL ELEMENTAL SIGNATURES IN THE OTOLITHS OF
LIPOPHRYS PHOLIS (PISCES: BLENNIIDAE). - Roxana
Vasile (Australia)
THE PROBLEM OF LIFE AND DEATH IN THE PLANKTON:
USING OTOLITH MICROSTRUCTURE TO EXAMINE
SELECTIVE MORTALITY IN YOUNG FISHES. - Su
Sponaugle (USA)
HATCHING PERIOD AND YOUNG OF THE YEAR
GROWTH OF THE ANNULAR SEABREAM, DIPLODUS
ANNULARIS (LINNAEUS, 1758), BASED ON OTOLITH
MICROSTRUCTURE ANALYSIS. - Hakan Ayyildiz
(Turkey)
THE INTERACTING EFFECTS OF PREY AVAILABILITY
AND TEMPERATURE ON LARVAL FISH GROWTH:
POTENTIAL IMPLICATIONS FOR THE "GROWTH-
SURVIVAL" PARADIGM. - John Dower (Canada)
SIZE SELECTIVE MORTALITY OF CULTURED ATLANTIC
BLUEFIN TUNA LARVAE INFERRED FROM OTOLITH
MICROSTRUCTURE ANALYSIS. - E Blanco (Spain)
EARLY LIFE STAGES OF FLATFISH: OTOLITH
MICROSTRUCTURE REREVEALS PATTERNS OF
DISPERSAL AND JUVENILE DYNAMICS. - Andreas
Bavière (Belgium)
EARLY LIFE HISTORY TRAITS OF HORSE MACKEREL
RECRUITING TO A NEARSHORE ROCKY REEF AREA.
- Maria Klein (Portugal)
SHAPING YOUR PAST: CAN OTOLITH SHAPE AND
STRUCTURE IDENTIFY DISPERSAL HISTORIES IN
AN AMPHIDROMOUS GALAXIID?. - Eimear Egan (New
Zealand)
DAILY AGE ESTIMATION OF YOUNG OF THE YEAR
COMMON PANDORA, PAGELLUS ERYTHRINUS
BASED ON OTOLITH MICROSTRUCTURE ANALYSIS. -
Aytac Altin (Turkey)
Session 5: Ecophysiology of early life stages: From
measurements to models
INDICATION OF INTERSPECIFIC DIFFERENCES IN
METABOLIC ACTIVITY AND HYPOXIA TOLERANCE IN
EARLY LIFE STAGES OF KEY FISH SPECIES FROM
THE NORTHERN BENGUELA UPWELLING SYSTEM,
...continued on p. 10
39th Conference Program...cont’d from p. 8
Stages
10 AFS - Early Life History Section
NAMIBIA, DERIVED FROM METABOLIC ENZYMATIC
ACTIVITIES. - Rashid Musa Imam (Germany)
BEHAVIOURAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES
TO PREY MATCH-MISMATCH IN LARVAL HERRING. -
Myron Peck (Germany)
PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE ON A NEW LEVEL - GENE
EXPRESSION ANALYSIS IN HERRING LARVAE IN
RELATION TO TEMPERATURE AND CO2. - Catriona
Clemmesen (Germany)
GLOBAL CHANGE AND STRESS: BALANCING
ENERGETICS OF INNER AND OUTER ECOSYSTEMS
IN DEVELOPING FISHES.. - Ione Hunt von Herbing (USA)
OCEAN ACIDIFICATION INCREASES FATTY ACIDS
LEVELS OF LARVAL FISH. - Carlos Diaz Gil (Spain)
SKELETAL DEVELOPMENT AND TRANSCRIPTION OF
GENES ASSOCIATED WITH VITAMIN C BIOSYNTHESIS,
GROWTH, AND OXYGEN SENSING DURING EARLY
DEVELOPMENT OF STURGEONS. - Arash Akbarzadeh
(Iran)
METABOLIC PROGRAMMING IN A MARINE FISH LARVA.
- Lee Fuiman (USA)
PROJECTED HABITAT LOSS FOR MARINE FISH IN THE
BALTIC SEA. - Björn Illing (Germany)
EFFECT OF FREE AMINO ACIDS AND NATURAL
EXTRACTS ON THE TRYPTIC ENZYME ACTIVITY OF
EUROPEAN SEA BASS LARVAE (DICENTRARCHUS
LABRAX L.). - Myron Peck (Germany)
ROUTINE SWIMMING SPEED OF BLUEFIN TUNA LARVAE
MEASURED IN THE LABORATORY. - P Reglero (Spain)
Session 6: Natural mortality in the egg and larvae stages
of shes
HOW MUCH OF THE SOLE EARLY LIFE STAGE
MORTALITY VARIABILITY IS EXPLAINED BY EGG AND
LARVAL DISPERSAL AND BY MISMATCH WITH ALGAL
BLOOM IN THE NORTH SEA?. - Geneviève Lacroix
(Belgium)
SURVIVAL AND GROWTH OF HERRING (CLUPEA
HARENGUS L.) EGGS AND LARVAE AT DIFFERENT
SALINITIES. - Arild Folkvord (Norway)
SPAWNING BED SELECTION OF ATLANTIC HERRING
(CLUPEA HARENGUS) IN COASTAL WATERS OF THE
WESTERN BALTIC SEA. - Dorothee Moll (Germany)
LARVAL ATLANTIC HERRING (CLUPEA HARENGUS)
FEEDING ACTIVITY IN RELATION TO PREFERRED
PREY ABUNDANCE AND SURVIVAL OFF THE COAST
OF NEWFOUNDLAND. - Carissa Currie (Canada)
EXPLORING LINKS BETWEEN MICROZOOPLANKTON
AND LARVAL HERRING (CLUPEA HARENGUS) IN THE
IRISH SEA. - Franziska Bils (Germany)
ANCHOVY EGG MORTALITY IN THE GULF OF CADIZ
AND ITS APPLICATION TO EGG PRODUCTION
ESTIMATION. - Paz Diaz (Spain)
DO YOU LIKE IT WARM OR COLD? TEMPERATURE
DEPENDENT MORTALITY OF EARLY LIFE-STAGES
OF ATLANTIC COD (GADUS MORHUA) IN THE NORTH
SEA. - Anna Akimova (Germany)
RESOLVING POTENTIAL PREY FIELDS OF ATLANTIC
HERRING (CLUPEA HARENGUS) LARVAE IN THE
NORTH SEA. - Carlos Palacio-Barros (Germany)
Session 7: Early Life History of Eels
LINKAGE BETWEEN ATLANTIC EEL LARVAE
DISTRIBUTION AND MESOSCALE EDDIES IN THE
SARGASSO SEA.. - Peter Munk (Denmark)
EARLY LARVAL GROWTH RATE AND HATCHING TIME OF
ATLANTIC EELS IN THEIR SARGASSO SEA SPAWNING
AREA. - Michael Miller (Japan)
NEW INSIGHTS INTO FEEDING BIOLOGY OF THE
EUROPEAN EEL (ANGUILLA ANGUILLA) VIA
MOLECULAR ANALYSES OF GUT CONTENTS, MARINE
SNOW AND ZOOPLANKTON. - Daniel Ayala (Denmark)
ORIENTATION OF EUROPEAN GLASS EELS (ANGUILLA
ANGUILLA) ARRIVING AT THE NORWEGIAN COAST. -
Alessandro Cresci (USA)
THE SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION OF THE
TOTAL LENGTH OF ANGUILLA LEPTOCEPHALI FROM
THREE RECENT SARGASSO SEA SURVEYS. - Håkan
Westerberg (Sweden)
BETWEEN THE JAWS OF THE LEPTOCEPHALUS LARVA:
MORPHOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS OF A RARELY
OBSERVED ORGANISM. - Mathias Bouilliart (Belgium)
THE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY OF ANGUILLID
LEPTOCEPHALI: IS LARVAL SURVIVAL A KEY TO
RECRUITMENT SUCCESS?. - Michael Miller (Japan)
THE INTERANNUAL VARIATION OF OCEAN CIRCULATION
AND THE IMPACT ON JAPANESE EELS DISPERSAL
MIGRATION IN WESTERN PACIFIC OCEAN. - Yu-Lin
Chang (Taiwan)
Session 8: Biology and Ecology of Early Life Stages
MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH FOR THE STUDY OF
LARVAL POPULATION STRUCTURE OF SARDINELLA
AURITA IN TWO DIFFERENT SITES OF THE
MEDITERRANEAN SEA. - Marco Torri (Italy)
WHAT KINDS OF FISHES USING THE KENTING SEA
AREA, SOUTHERN TAIWAN AS THEIR SPAWNING
AND NURSERY GROUND WITH DNA BARCODED
IDENTIFICATION. - Han-Yang Lin (Taiwan)
LARVAL FISH ASSEMBLAGES FROM YEARS WITH
DIFFERENT OCEANOGRAPHIC CONDITIONS IN THE
SOUTHEASTERN BRAZILIAN BIGHT. - Claudia Namiki
(Brazil)
EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE ON BEHAVIOR AND
PHYSIOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT OF LARVAE OF A
COLD STENOTHERMAL FISH, THE BROWN TROUT
(SALMO TRUTTA).. - Tatiana Colchen (France)
...continued on p. 11
39th Conference Program...cont’d from p. 9
June 2015
11
ELHS website: cmast.ncsu.edu/elhs
STUDIES OF PLANKTON AS AN EFFECTIVE TOOL TO
DETECT NEW INVASIONS. - AP Torres (Spain)
EVALUATING METHODS IN LARVAL FISH TAXONOMY:
DNA BARCODING, MORPHOLOGY AND LABORATORY
PRACTICES. - Stephanie Borchardt (Germany)
IDENTIFICATION OF FISH EGGS USING METAGENOMICS.
- Jae Myung Yoo (South Korea)
CRITICAL TRAITS FOR ADVERSE POPULATION EFFECTS
OF MATERNALLY TRANSFERRED TOXICANTS IN
FISH. - A.J. Murk (Netherlands)
LARVAL YEAR CLASS STRENGTH AND
SPATIOTEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION PATTERNS OF
EUROPEAN WHITEFISH (COREGONUS LAVARETUS
L.) IN PRE-ALPINE AUSTRIAN LAKES. - Josef
Wanzenböck (Austria)
LARVAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE BLACK-
FACED BLENNY, TRIPTERYGION DELAISI FROM THE
ARRABIDA MARINE PARK, PORTUGAL. - Farahnaz
Solomon (Portugal)
INVESTIGATING NUTRITIONAL EFFECTS ON GROWTH
RATES OF LARVAL HERRING IN THE WESTERN
BALTIC SEA. - Matthias Paulsen (Germany)
FISH LARVAL DISTRIBUTION ACROSS HABITATS IN
COASTAL EAST AFRICA. - Per Hedberg (Sweden)
LIPIDS AND FATTY ACIDS IN EARLY LIFE HISTORY
OF THE MARINE FISH LEPTOCLINUS MACULATUS
(FRIES, 1838) IN THE ARCTIC WINTER. - Svetlana
Pekkoeva (Russian Fed.)
FEEDING STRATEGY OF DOWNS HERRING LARVAE IN
THE ENGLISH CHANNEL AND NORTH SEA. - Jeremy
Denis (France)
IMPORTANCE OF PLANKTON SEASONALITY ON
LARVAL HERRING AND YEAR-CLASS ABUNDANCE
OF THE GULF OF RIGA SPRING SPAWNING HERRING
(CLUPEA HARENGUS M.). - Timo Arula (Estonia)
ECOLOGICAL VERSATILITY ALTERS THE STRENGTH
OF PRIORITY EFFECTS FOR SETTLEMENT-
STAGE CORAL REEF FISHES IN A DEGRADING
ENVIRONMENT. - Davina Poulos (Australia)
ONTOGENY OF ORIENTATION IN ATLANTIC HADDOCK
LARVAE MEASURED IN SITU. - Claire B. Paris (USA)
SPATIO-TEMPORAL DYNAMICS OF LARVAL FISH IN THE
MAHURY RIVER ESTUARY (FRENCH GUIANA). - Yann
Rousseau (F. Guayana)
COLLIDING INDUSTRIES: DISTRIBUTION OF SPAWNING
AND FRY OF NORTH SEA FISHES IN THE LIGHT OF
SEISMIC EXPLORATION. - Hannes Höfe (Norway)
EIGHT YEARS OF MONITORING LARVAL FISHES IN
YORK RIVER, CHESAPEAKE BAY. - Cindy Marin
Martinez (USA)
PUFA RICH OIL EMULSION AND ITS EFFECT ON
CLOWNFISH AMPHIPRION SEBAE LARVAE. -
Iyyapparajanarasimapallavan Gunasekaran (India)
EFFECTS OF OCEAN ACIDIFICATION ON THE SKELETAL
DEVELOPMENT IN LARVAL STAGES OF HERRING
AND COD. - Nalani K. Schnell (France)
CHARACTERISTICS OF AMPHIDROMOUS GOBIOID
LARVAE IN RELATION TO LARVAL RETENTION AND
DISPERSAL. - Midori Iida (Japan)
A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF THE TROPHIC
ECOLOGY FOR ATLANTIC BLUFIN TUNA THUNNUS
THYNNUS: GULF OF MEXICO AND MEDITERRANEAN
SEA. - Trika Gerard (USA)
COMPARISON OF FISH AND INVERTEBRATE
ASSEMBLAGES AMONG VARIABLY ALTERED
TIDAL CREEKS IN A COASTAL LANDSCAPE. - Paul
Rudershausen (USA)
LARVAL FISH RESPOND TO CHEMICAL STIMULATION
BY DIMETHYLSULFIDE. - Matt Foretich (USA)
FATTY ACID CONSTITUENTS OF STORAGE AND
MEMBRANE LIPIDS IN BIOCHEMICAL ADAPTATIONS
OF POSTLARVAE AND JUVENILES OF LEPTOCLINUS
MACULATUS (FRIES, 1838) IN SVALBARD WATERS. -
Svetlana A. Murzina (Russian Fed.)
BATHYPELAGIC PERCID FRY, THE ONLY COMMUNITY
IN THE VÍR RESERVOIR. - Zuzana Sajdlova (Czech
Rep.)
EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE EARLY LIFE
STAGES OF NORTHERN PIKE: ESOX LUCIUS. - Emilie
Realis-Doyelle (France)
GLOCHIDIA INFECTION OF FISH EARLY LIFE-STAGES:
AN EXAMPLE OF HOW INFLUX OF EXOTIC SPECIES
AFFECTS HOST-PARASITE RELATIONSHIPS. - Michal
Janác (Czech Rep.)
SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF FISH LARVAE IN THE
ENGLISH CHANNEL AND NORTH SEA INFERRED
FROM THE IBTS-MIK SAMPLING. - Christophe Loots
(France)
DISTRIBUTION AND DYNAMIC OF LARVAL FISHES
IN THE MIDDLE YANGTZE RIVER: PRELIMINARY
ANALYSIS ON IMPACT OF THETHREE GORGES DAM.
- Yiqing Song (China)
PHOTOTACTIC BEHAVIOR IN LARVAL PIKE PERCH
(SANDER LUCIOPERCA): A CHANCE FOR GENTLE
SIZE GRADING IN AQUACULTURE.. - Moritz Tielmann
(Germany)
ONTOGENETIC DEVELOPMENT OF PEPSIN ENZYME
AND PEPSINOGEN GENE EXPRESSION IN SOBEITY
SEA BREAM LARVAE, SPARIDENTEX HASTA
(VALENCIENNES, 1830). - M.A. Nematollahi (Iran)
GROWTH, SURVIVAL AND ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION TO
EVALUATE FOOD ASSIMILATION IN FIRST FEEDING
SEAHORSES. - Sonia Valladares (Spain)
...continued on p. 12
39th Conference Program...cont’d from p. 10
Stages
12 AFS - Early Life History Section
SEASONAL VARIATION OF THE ICHTHYOPLANKTON
ASSEMBLAGES IN SHALLOW COASTAL WATERS
AROUND GOKCEADA ISLAND (NORTH AEGEAN SEA).
- Ismail Burak Daban (Turkey)
LARVAL FISH HABITATS IN A MESOSCALE DIPOLE EDDY
IN THE GULF OF CALIFORNIA. - Ethel Apango Figueroa
(Mexico)
LEARNING FROM FAILURE: A NEW UNDERSTANDING
OF THE FEEDING MECHANISM IN FISH LARVAE. -
Victor China (Israel)
EFFECT OF DIETARY L-CARNITINE SUPPLEMENTATION
ON GROWTH PERFORMANCE, SURVIVAL RATE AND
RESISTANCE TO ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES IN
SOBAITY SEABREAM FRY (SPARIDENTEX HASTA). -
Iman Sourinejad (Iran)
SPAWNING HABITAT OF ENGRAULIS ANCHOITA IN
THE SOUTHERN BRAZILIAN BIGHT: A COMPARASION
WITH SARDINELLA BRASILIENSIS. - Jana Menegassi
del Favero (Brazil)
A REVIEW OF RESEARCHES AND APPLICATIONS ABOUT
EARLY LIFE HISTORY STAGES OF FRESHWATER
FISHES IN CHINA. - Songguang Xie (China)
A REVIEW OF RESEARCHES AND APPLICATIONS ABOUT
EARLY LIFE HISTORY STAGES OF FRESHWATER
FISHES IN CHINA. - Songguang Xie (China)
MORPHOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE DOCTOR
FISH (GARRA RUFA) LARVAE. - Pinar Celik (Turkey)
SPAWNING SEASONS AND GROUNDS OF REEF FISHES
IN THE RED SEA BASED ON ICHTHYOPLANKTON
SURVEY. - Mohamed Abu El-Regal (Egypt)
ATLANTIC BLUEFIN TUNA SPAWNING HABITAT IN
THE GULF OF MEXICO AND WESTERN CARIBBEAN:
RESULTS FROM A RECENT SURVEY OF CUBAN
WATERS.. - John Lamkin (USA)
HOW TO MAINTAIN IN AN UPWELLING AREA?
SPAWNING STRATEGIES AND LARVAL RETENTION
MECHANISMS. - Maik Tiedemann (Germany)
SURFZONE CHARACTERISTICS APPEAR TO DRIVE
DIRECT RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN REPRODUCTION
AND RECRUITMENT IN A COMMON INTERTIDAL
CRAB. - Erin Satterthwaite (USA)
A LARVAL-CENTRIC VIEW OF AMPHIDROMY AND
CATADROMY: A LIFE HISTORY CONTINUUM
DELIVERING FISH LARVAE TO PELAGIC REARING
HABITAT ACROSS CONTRASTING HYDROLOGICAL
LANDSCAPES. - Gerry Closs (New Zealand)
NICHE PARTITIONING AND ECOMORPHOLOGY IN
EARLY LIFE HISTORY STAGE DRUMS (FAMILY
SCIAENIDAE) FROM THE CHESAPEAKE BAY. - Alison
L. Deary (USA)
FISH LARVAL COMMUNITY CHANGES PATTERNS IN
CREEKS AND ESTUARIES HABITATS (1996 & 2013),
BUSHEHR PROVINCE - PERSIAN GULF. - Mahnaz
Rabbaniha (Iran)
ADDITIVE AND SYNERGISTIC EFFECTS OF
CONCURRENT ACIDIFICATION AND HYPOXIA ON
EARLY LIFE STAGES OF THREE COASTAL FORAGE
FISH. - Hannes Baumann (USA)
Poster presentations
PATCHINESS OF EGGS AND LARVAE OF ENGRAULIS
ANCHOITA FROM THE SOUTHEASTERN BRAZILIAN
BIGHT. - Jana Menegassi del Favero (Brazil)
THE EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE ON GROWTH,
SURVIVAL AND AEROBIC SCOPE OF EUROPEAN
WEATHERFISH LARVAE (MISGURNUS FOSSILIS). -
Benjamin Schreiber (Germany)
SIZE DEPENDENT GROWTH IN LARVAL HERRING -
ALWAYS AN ISSUE?. - Matthias Paulsen (Germany)
MULTIVARIATE MOPHOMETRIC AND EARLY LIFE
STAGES GROWTH PATTERNS OF AUXIS ROCHEI
(RISSO, 1810) RELATED TO ENVIRONMENTAL
CONDITION IN SICILY CHANNEL. - Angela Cuttitta (Italy)
ANTIOXIDANT ENZYME ACTIVITIES VITAMIN E AND
LIPID PEROXIDATION DURING EARLY DEVELOPMENT
IN UNFED RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS
MYKISS) LARVAE. - Hatayi Zengin (Turkey)
OPTIMAL DESIGN FOR LARVAL FISH SAMPLING: A
CASE STUDY IN THE TAMSUI ESTUARY, NORTHERN
TAIWAN. - Yu-Ming Shih (Taiwan)
SEA-LAGOON CONNECTIVITY: TWO YEARS
MONITORING OF EGGS, LARVAE AND POSTLARVAE
OF FISH IN THE VENICE LAGOON. - Francesco Cavraro
(Italy)
LARVAL FISH ASSEMBLAGES ALONG AN OCEAN-
ESTUARINE GRADIENT: CONNECTIVITY EVIDENCES.
- Sandra Ramos (Portugal)
DIETARY PHENYLALANINE REQUIREMENT OF LARVAL
OLIVE FLOUNDER (PARALICHTHYS OLIVACEUS). -
Kyeong-Jun Lee (South Korea)
SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF ATLANTIC BLUEFIN TUNA
LARVAE IN TUNISIAN WATERS IN RELATION WITH
ENVIRONMENTAL PARAMETERS. - Wael Koched
(Tunisia)
IS THERE A LINK BETWEEN CANNIBAL STATUS
AND PERSONALITY IN PIKEPERCH (SANDER
LUCIOPERCA) LARVAE?. - Elodie Faux (France)
CHARACTERIZING SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL FLOW
PATTERNS IN SUCTION FEEDING FISH LARVAE. -
Liraz Levy (Israel)
INFLUENCE OF ENVIRONMENTAL VARIABLES ON
THE LARVAL STAGES OF ANCHOVY, ENGRAULIS
ENCRASICOLUS, AND SARDINE, SARDINOPS SAGAX,
IN ALGOA BAY, SOUTH AFRICA. - David Costalago
(France)
...continued on p. 14
39th Conference Program...cont’d from p. 11
June 2015
13
ELHS website: cmast.ncsu.edu/elhs
Other Publications
Guide d’Identication des Post-larves de Méditerranée.
Edited by G. Lecaillon, M. Murenu, F. Hackradt, and P.
Lenfant. Ecocean Nova Science Publishers, Inc.. 2012.
Proceedings of the 36th Annual Larval Fish Conference.
Edited by H.I. Browman and A.B. Skiftesvik. ICES Journal of
Marine Science 71(4). 2014.
A Handbook to Help Identify Hudson River Fish Larvae. By
L. G. Arvidson and J. B. Alber. Published by the authors,
Rosendale, New York. 2013.
Larval Fish Aquaculture. Edited by Jian G. Quin. Published
by Nova Science Publishers, Inc.. ISBN:978-1-62417-899-3.
2013
Zooplankton of the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts: A Guide to
Their Identication and Ecology. 2nd edition. By William S.
Johnson and Dennis M. Allen. Published by Johns Hopkins
University Press. ISBN-13:978-1421406183. 2012.
Larval Fish Nutrition. Edited by G. Joan Holt. Published by
Wiley-Blackwell. ISBN-0813817927. 2011.
Identication of Eggs and Larvae of Marine Fishes. Edited
by A.W. Kendall, Jr. Published by Tokai University Press.
ISBN-978-4-486-03758-3. 2011.
Ecology of Estuarine Fishes: Temperate Waters of the
Western North Atlantic. By Kenneth W. Able and Michael P.
Fahay. Published by Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN-
0801894719. 2010.
Early Stages of Marine Fishes Occurring in the Iberian
Peninsula. P. Ré and I. Meneses. Published by IPIMAR/
IMAR. ISBN-978-972-9372-34-6.
Ecology of Anguilliform Leptocephali: Remarkable
Transparent Fish Larvae of the Ocean Surface Layer.
M.J. Miller. Published by Aqua-BioScience Monographs.
TERRAPUB. 2009.
Advances in Early Life History Study of Fish. C. Clemmesen,
A.M. Malzahn, M.A. Peck, and D. Schnack, eds. Scientia
Marina, volume 73S1, Supplement 1. Consejo Superior de
Investigaciones Cienticas. 2009.
Plankton. A Guide to Their Ecology and Monitoring for Water
Quality. I.M. Suthers & D. Rissik. Published by CSIRO
Publishing, 272 pp. 2009. ISBN: 9780643090583.
Manual of Recommended Practices for Modelling Physical –
Biological Interactions during Fish Early Life. Edited by E.W.
North, A. Gallego, and P. Petitgas, Jr. ICES Cooperative
Research Report No. 295. 111 pp. 2009. ISBN: 978–87–
7482–060–4.
Early Life History of Marine Fishes. B.S. Miller and A.W.
Kendall, Jr. Published by University of California Press.
ISBN: 978-0-520-24972-1. 2009.
Fish Larval Physiology. R.N. Finn and B.G. Kapoor.
Published by Science Publishers. ISBN: 1578083885. 2008.
Reproductive Biology and Early Life History of Fishes in the
Ohio River Drainage
Volume VI, Elassomidae and Centrarchidae. Edited by R.
Wallus and T.P. Simon. Published by CRC Press. ISBN 978-
0-8493-1923-8. 2008; 472 p.
Volume V, Aphredoderidae through Cottidae, Moronidae,
and Sciaenidae. Edited by R. Wallus and T.P. Simon.
Published by CRC Press. ISBN 978-0-8493-1921-1. 2006;
360 p.
...continued on p. 14
Available now: An Atlas of Early Stage
Fishes in Japan. 2nd edition
Edited by Muneo Okiyama
Published by Tokai University Press, Hadano,
Japan. 2014.
ISBN: 978-4-486-01775-2 C3645
Available from: Mr. Hiroshi Ina, Tokai University Press
(inaair@keyaki.cc.u-tokai.ac.jp). §
Available now: Migration Ecology of
Marine Fishes.
By David Hallock Secor
Published by Johns Hopkins University Press.
2015. 304pp.
ISBN-13: 978-1421416120
Available from Johns Hopkins University
Press, c/o Hopkins Fulllment Service, P.O. Box 50370,
Baltimore, MD 21211-4370, USA or www.press.jhu.edu
With stunning clarity, David Hallock Secor’s Migration
Ecology of Fishes nally penetrates the clandestine
nature of marine sh migration. A synthetic treatment
of all marine sh taxa (teleosts and elasmobranchs),
this book employs explanatory frameworks from avian
and systems ecology while arguing that migrations are
emergent phenomena, structured through schooling,
phenotypic plasticity, and other collective agencies.
The book provides overviews of the following concepts:
The comparative movement ecology of shes and birds
• The alignment of mating systems with larval dispersal
Schooling and migration as adaptations to marine food
webs
• Natal homing
• Connectivity in populations and metapopulations
The contribution of migration ecology to population
resilience
Special 30% discount available. Or order by phone: 1-800-
537-5487. Be sure to mention the code HNAF to receive
the 30% discount. §
Publications
Stages
14 AFS - Early Life History Section
Volume IV, Percidae – Perch, Pikeperch, and Darters. T.P.
Simon and R. Wallus. Published by CRC Press. ISBN 978-
0-8493-1920-4. 2006; 648 p.
Volume III, Ictaluridae – Catsh and Madtoms. T.P. Simon
and R. Wallus. Published by CRC Press. ISBN 0849319196.
2003; 232 p.
Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in the Northeast Pacic Ocean:
Regional Comparisons. Edited by C. B. Grimes, R. D. Broder,
L. J. Halderson and S. M. McKinnell. American Fisheries
Society, Symposium 57, Bethesda, MD. 2007.
Early Stages of Fishes in the Western North Atlantic Ocean:
Davis Strait, Southern Greenland and Flemish Cap to Cape
Hatteras. Michael P. Fahay. Published by North Atlantic
Fisheries Organization.
Early Development of Four Cyprinids Native to the Yangtze
River, China. Edited by D.C. Chapman. U.S. Geological
Survey Data Series 239. 2006. accessible online at pubs.
usgs.gov/ds/2006/239
Recent Advances in the Study of Fish Eggs and Larvae.
Edited by M.P. Olivar and J.J. Govoni. Published in Scientia
Marina, Volume 70S2 Supplement 2. ISSN: 0214-8358. 2006.
Eggs and Larvae of North Sea Fishes. P. Munk and J.G.
Nielsen. Published by Biofolia Press. ISBN 0849319161.
2005.
Early Stages of Atlantic Fishes: An Identication Guide for
the Western Central North Atlantic. Edited by W.J. Richards.
Published by CRC Press. ISBN 0849319161. 2005.
Developmental Biology of Teleost Fishes. Y.W. Kunz.
Published by Springer Press. ISBN 1-4020-2996-9. 2004.
Early Life History of Fishes in the San Francisco Estuary and
Watershed. Edited by F. Feyrer, L.R. Brown, R.L. Brown,
and J.J. Orsi. Published by the American Fisheries Society.
ISBN 1-888569-59-X. 2004.
Freshwater Fishes of the Northeastern United States - A
Field Guide. R.G. Werner. Published by Syracuse University
Press. ISBN 0815630204. 2004.
The Development of Form and Function in Fishes and
the Question of Larval Adaptation. Edited by J.J. Govoni.
Published by the American Fisheries Society. ISBN
1-888569-58-1. 2004.
The Larvae of Indo-Pacic Coastal Fishes: An Identication
Guide to Marine Fish Larvae. (2nd edition). J.M. Leis and
B.M. Carson-Ewart. Published by Brill Academic Publishers.
ISBN 90-04-13650-9. 2004.
The Big Fish Bang. Proceedings of the 26th Annual Larval
Fish Conference. Edited by H.I. Browman and A.B.
Skiftesvik. Published by the Institute of Marine Research,
Bergen, Norway. ISBN 82-7461-059-8. 2004.
Fishery Science: The Unique Contributions of Early
Life Stages. Edited by Lee A. Fuiman and Robert
G. Werner. Published by Blackwell Publishing.
ISBN 0-632-05661-4. 2002. §
IMPACT OF A JUVENILE TROUT FARM ON SOME
PHYSICOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS OF RIVER WATER.
- Hadi Fadavi (Iran)
APPLICATION OF AN INORGANIC
FERTILIZATION METHOD IN CORAL REEF
FISH LARVICULTURE. - Kwee Tew (Taiwan)
MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION OF AUXIS SPP.
LARVAE (PISCES: SCOMBRIDAE) OF GULF OF
CALIFORNIA. - María José Ochoa Muñoz (Mexico)
DISTRIBUTION AND FEEDING STRATEGY OF AUXIS
SPP. LARVAE AND ITS RELATION WITH EDDIES IN
THE GULF OF CALIFORNIA. - María José Ochoa Muñoz
(Mexico)
STUDY ON THE GROWTH OF JUVENILE KUTUM (RUILUS
FRISII KUTUM) FED BY VITAMIN C. - Hadi Fadavi (Iran)
EFFECT OF STOCKING DENSITY ON WATER QUALITY
AND GROWTH PERFORMANCE OF RAINBOW
TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS) FINGERLING. -
Mohammad Reza Ghomi (Iran)
CHANGES IN ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS OF
SEAGRASS BEDS AS HABITATS FOR LARVAL AND
JUVENILE FISHES FROM 2009 TO 2014, THE PERIOD
BEFORE AND AFTER THE TSUNAMI FOLLOWING
THE 2011 OFF THE PACIFIC COAST OF TOHOKU
EARTHQUAKE. - Jun Shoji (Japan) §
Oral presentations: Keynote talks will be 40 minutes plus
5 minutes for questions. Standard talks will be 15 minutes
(including questions, please try to leave 3 minutes for
questions and discussions). This duration of talks offers
everyone the opportunity to listen to all of the talks - there
will be no parallel sessions.
Posters will be spread out in separate rooms and there
will be socials (snacks and drinks) on Monday and Tuesday
evening to encourage people to talk with poster presenters
and with each other. Please note that the poster format will
be up to A0, portrait style.
Program: We will distribute the nal program - as a PDF
le - by end of June. You will receive a printed program when
you register at the registration desk.
Professional development: There will be a workshop on
grant writing organized by Alison L. Deary.
Please note that registration is open. Information about
registration, conference fee, venue, travel, hotels etc. is
available at the conference website: www.larvalshcon.org/
Conf_home.asp?ConferenceCode=39th
If you have any questions or queries regarding registration,
hotel booking do not hesitate to get in touch with us:
congress@univie.ac.at.
If you have any questions or concerns regarding other
issues of the conference please contact the organizer,
39th LFC Program...cont’d from p. 12
Publications...cont’d from p. 13
...continued on p. 15
39th LFC...cont’d from p. 1
June 2015
15
ELHS website: cmast.ncsu.edu/elhs
Hubert Keckeis at: Hubert.Keckeis@
univie.ac.at.
We look forward to seeing you
in Vienna! §
— Hubert Keckeis and the local
organizing committee
hear talks and discuss topics such as
the mechanisms of dispersal and
connectivity and (other) processes
contributing to mortality of shes in
a variety of habitats. We will also be
provided updates on the state-of-
the-art tools (from measurements of
genetics to biophysical models) used to
answer key questions. I am condent
that the meeting will be another great
opportunity for limnologists and marine
biologist to mingle and migrate together.
On behalf of our section, I am grateful
to Hubert and his crew for organizing
the upcoming event!!
In my opinion, one of the most
important missions/functions that
our section has/serves is to provide
training and opportunities to early
career researchers. Last autumn, our
section created a new opportunity
to help students attend our annual
LFCs in the form of Grace Klein-
MacPhee Travel Grants. Grace was
an ardent supporter of students and
she organized the judging of our
prestigious Sally Richardson award for
many years. This spring, we were able
to provide travel grants to 12 students!
Individuals sponsored on travel grants
included both MSc and PhD students
coming to Vienna from a total of eight
countries from Chile to China. Grace
Klein-MacPhee Travel Grants along
with ongoing activities stemming
from the newly formed “Early Career
Committee” (you lled out your survey,
right?) will help ensure that we continue
to enhance education and training
activities. For those of you who made
a donation in the memory of Grace
Klein MacPhee, and/or those who
have donated their time to mentoring
activities, I thank you on behalf of our
section. I am particularly proud that
we unanimously voted to establish the
Grace Klein-MacPhee Travel Grants
and that we were able to provide
support to a dozen students this year.
I do not need to remind folks reading
this newsletter about the importance of
early life – we are taking actions which
will help promote “recruitment success”
and “strong year-classes” of ELHS
researchers in the future.
To the younger members of our
section, I would like to share a few
thoughts. First, a sure sign of getting
older is when you start to write more
and more review articles and when you
start to spend a lot of time reecting on
the past. I started to do these things a
few years ago (a very scary realization
for me). When one looks back, you see
that every few years or so, scientists
meet to discuss processes determining
recruitment success. After a meeting
in Canada in 1994, Chris Chambers
and Ed Trippel edited a book on the
subject (Chambers & Trippel 1997).
In September 1997, a large group met
in Baltimore, Maryland for a few days
to discuss Recruitment Dynamics of
Exploited Marine Populations: Physical
Biological Interactions. About 10 years
later, a large meeting on Reproductive
and Recruitment Processes of
Exploited Marine Fish Stocks was
held in Lisbon, Portugal. Most recently,
(October 2014), a recruitment dynamics
symposium was held in Bergen,
Norway in celebration of 100 years
since Johan Hjort published his 1914
paper on “Fluctuations in the Great
Fisheries of Northern Europe.” When
one reads the reports, articles and
books stemming from these meetings,
it is clear how important our section’s
members have been in synthesizing
and advancing the eld of recruitment
dynamics. The LFC provides a unique
opportunity for you to engage with
these and other older/wiser folks (if
needed, I will happily introduce you to
some of them…). It is an exciting time
and I am lled with anticipation for
you to share your ideas with them – to
question established paradigms – to
establish new collaborations – to build
on past successes. My message to
you is simple. Whether you attend this
upcoming meeting in Vienna, Austria
or next year’s (2016) meeting when we
head back to Maryland - early career
scientists – take advantage of our
section, get involved and stay involved!
Helping to solve the “Recruitment
Problem” is only one of many topics
ready for you to tackle.
With those ramblings behind me, I
can also proudly report that our section
is doing very well. We are scally
strong (please thank our treasurer
Jeff Buckel for doing such a great job
managing our accounts), we are well
organized (please thank our secretary
Fred Scharf for his tireless efforts), and
elections are proceeding to ll our open
leadership positions (Secretary-Elect
and President-Elect). Our website will
soon have a facelift with help from AFS
– and I can even report (my hope) that
the LFC ag will nd its way to Vienna
in for its next auction. I look forward to
seeing you there – and bidding against
you!
Chambers RC, Trippel EA (1997) Early
Life History and Recruitment in Fish
Populations. Chapman and Hall. §
— Myron Peck,
ELHS President
President’s Message...cont’d from p. 1
39th LFC...cont’d from p. 14
Red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) larva, 11 days posthatching. (Photo by Cypress
Hansen, University of Texas Marine Science Institute.)
AFS - Early Life History Section
Newsletter Production Team
Stages is published in February, June, and October each year. It is assembled by the Newsletter Editor with contributions
from several Regional Representatives and other individuals. Please send any articles, announcements, or information of
interest to Early Life History Section members or afliates to your local Regional Representative or to the Editor.
Stages
Newsletter Editor
Lee A. Fuiman
Marine Science Institute
University of Texas at Austin
lee.fuiman@utexas.edu
Northeast Region
David Richardson
NMFS, Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Narragansett, Rhode Island
David.Richardson@noaa.gov
Southern Region
vacant
North Central Region
vacant
Western Region
Daniel Margulies
Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission
LaJolla, California
dmargulies@iattc.ucsd.edu
European Region
Hubert Keckeis
Department of Limnology
University of Vienna
Vienna, Austria
hubert.keckeis@univie.ac.at
Pacic Rim Region
Akinori Takasuka
National Research Institute of
Fisheries Science
Yokohama, Japan
takasuka@affrc.go.jp
Join ELHS
Membership in ELHS is open to all persons
or organizations interested in furthering ELHS
objectives, regardless of membership in the
American Fisheries Society (AFS). If you are an
AFS member, simply add ELHS membership
when you pay your Society dues.
Afliate membership is open to persons or
organizations who are not members of AFS.
Afliate members are encouraged to participate
in Section meetings, committee work, and other
activities, but they cannot vote on ofcial Section
matters, run for or hold an elected ofce, or
chair standing committees. All members receive
STAGES.
ELHS has a PayPal account to receive afliate
membership dues. To join ELHS as an afliate
or to renew afliate status online, go to: cmast.
ncsu.edu/elhs/how-to-join or mail your name,
institutional afliation (if appropriate), mailing
address, telephone and fax numbers, e-mail
address, and dues (US $15 per year) for the
current and/or upcoming year(s) to the ELHS
Treasurer (see page 2).
Please specify the membership year(s) for
which you are paying dues. Make checks or
money orders payable to “AFS-ELHS.”
Editor’s Ramblings
Fond Farewells
I can sympathise with the reections on aging that Myron
wrote in his President’s Message. It does not seem all that
long ago when I met Joanne Lyczkowski-Shultz at the
Ichs and Herps meeting in Williamsburg, Virginia. Okay,
it was 1975, but it does not SEEM long ago. Joanne was
responsible for my rst publication, which was a descriptive note on the
early larvae of the sea raven. At the time, I was rearing these larvae from
an egg mass collected on the beach, but I had no idea which species
it was. Joanne’s doctoral work on sculpins (mentioned in Jeff Govoni’s
tribute to Joanne on p. 5 of this issue of STAGES) was in progress and
she sent me specimens of later stages which conrmed the identication.
Thanks, Joanne, for getting me started, and congratulations on your
impressive career. Best wishes for a long and enjoyable retirement. We
will miss you.
Few ELHS members will recall one of our founders, Ronnie J.
Kernehan. Ron, together with Darrel Snyder, worked hard to get the
Early LIfe History Section established within the American Fisheries
Society. Ron was elected as our rst President-Elect 35 years ago but
decided on a careeer change before taking ofce. To my great surprise,
he reappeared at the 35th annual Larval Fish Conference (see photo
on p. 14 of STAGES 32(2/3)) and claimed that he actually recognized
me (I was not able to say the same about him). I am deeply sorry to
report that Ron passed away earlier this month. Darrel is preparing a
more complete rememberance of Ron for the next issue of STAGES. §
16
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Published by Biofolia Press
  • Nielsen
Nielsen. Published by Biofolia Press. ISBN 0849319161.
An Identification Guide for the Western Central North Atlantic. Edited by W
  • Early Stages
  • Atlantic J Fishes
  • Richards
Early Stages of Atlantic Fishes: An Identification Guide for the Western Central North Atlantic. Edited by W.J. Richards. Published by CRC Press. ISBN 0849319161. 2005. Developmental Biology of Teleost Fishes. Y.W. Kunz. Published by Springer Press. ISBN 1-4020-2996-9. 2004.
  • C B Grimes
  • R D Broder
  • L J Halderson
Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in the Northeast Pacific Ocean: Regional Comparisons. Edited by C. B. Grimes, R. D. Broder, L. J. Halderson and S. M. McKinnell. American Fisheries Society, Symposium 57, Bethesda, MD. 2007.