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Abstract

In their Review “Contrasting futures for ocean and society from different anthropogenic CO2 emissions scenarios” (Reviews, 3 July, p. 45), J.-P. Gattuso et al. write that anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions must be drastically reduced to avoid “massive and effectively irreversible

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