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New Taxa and Combinations in Onciderini Thomson, 1860 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae) from Central and South America, with notes on additional taxa

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Touroultia, a new genus of Onciderini Thomson, 1860 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae) is described and illustrated. Five new species of Onciderini are also described and illustrated: Jamesia ramirezi from Costa Rica; Peritrox marcelae from French Guiana; Touroultia swifti from Ecuador; Touroultia lordi from French Guiana; Trestoncideres santossilvai from Brazil. Keys to the known species of Peritrox Bates, 1865; Touroultia gen. nov.; and Trestoncideres Martins and Galileo, 1990 are provided. The following new synonymies are proposed: Calliphenges Waterhouse, 1880 (Colobotheini) = Malthonea Thomson, 1864 (Desmiphorini); Paraclytemnestra Breuning, 1974 (Onciderini) = Jamesia Jekel, 1861 (Onciderini); Orteguaza Lane, 1958 (Apomecynini) = Clavidesmus Dillon and Dillon, 1946 (Onciderini). The following new combinations are proposed: Clavidesmus funerarius (Lane, 1958) (Onciderini); Clavidesmus lichenigerus (Lane, 1958) (Onciderini); Ischiocentra insulata (Rodrigues and Mermudes, 2011); Malthonea cuprascens (Waterhouse, 1880) (Desmiphorini); Touroultia obscurella (Bates, 1865) (Onciderini). The following species is restored to original combination: Jamesia lineata Fisher, 1926 (Onciderini). The following 13 new country records are reported: Ataxia hovorei Lingafelter and Nearns, 2007 (Pteropliini) (Haiti); Carterica soror Belon, 1896 (Colobotheini) (Ecuador); Colobothea lunulata Lucas, 1859 (Colobotheini) (Colombia); Curius punctatus (Fisher, 1932) (Curiini) (Haiti); Cyclopeplus lacordairei Thomson, 1868 (Anisocerini) (Colombia); Iarucanga mimica (Bates, 1866) (Hemilophini) (Ecuador); Pirangoclytus latithorax (Martins and Galileo, 2008) (Clytini) (Costa Rica); Porangonycha princeps (Bates, 1872) (Hemilophini) (Colombia); Trestonia lateapicata Martins and Galileo, 2010 (Onciderini) (Brazil); Tulcus dimidiatus (Bates, 1865) (Onciderini) (Colombia); Unaporanga cincta Martins and Galileo, 2007 (Hemilophini) (Colombia); Zeale dubia Galileo and Martins, 1997 (Hemilophini) (Colombia); Zonotylus interruptus (Olivier, 1790) (Trachyderini) (Colombia). Resumen. Touroultia, un nuevo género de Onciderini Thomson, 1860 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae) es descrito e ilustrado. Cinco nuevas especies de Onciderini son descritas e ilustradas: Jamesia ramirezi de Costa Rica; Peritrox marcelae de Guayana Francesa; Touroultia swifti de Ecuador; Touroultia lordi de Guayana Francesa; Trestoncideres santossilvai de Brasil. Claves de las especies de Peritrox Bates, 1865; Touroultia gen. nov.; y Trestoncideres Martins y Galileo, 1990; son incluidas. Las siguientes nuevas sinonimias se proponen: Calliphenges Waterhouse, 1880 (Colobotheini) = Malthonea Thomson, 1864 (Desmiphorini); Paraclytemnestra Breuning, 1974 (Onciderini) = Jamesia Jekel, 1861 (Onciderini); Orteguaza Lane, 1958 (Apomecynini) = Clavidesmus Dillon y Dillon, 1946 (Onciderini). Las siguientes nuevas combinaciones se proponen: Clavidesmus funerarius (Lane, 1958) (Onciderini); Clavidesmus lichenigerus (Lane, 1958) (Onciderini); Ischiocentra insulata (Rodrigues y Mermudes, 2011); Malthonea cuprascens (Waterhouse, 1880) (Desmiphorini); Touroultia obscurella (Bates, 1865) (Onciderini). La siguiente especie es restaurada a la combinación original: Jamesia lineata Fisher, 1926 (Onciderini). Los siguientes 13 nuevos registros de país se reportan: Ataxia hovorei Lingafelter y Nearns, 2007 (Pteropliini) (Haiti); Carterica soror Belon, 1896 (Colobotheini) (Ecuador); Colobothea lunulata Lucas, 1859 (Colobotheini) (Colombia); Curius punctatus (Fisher, 1932) (Curiini) (Haiti); Cyclopeplus lacordairei Thomson, 1868 (Anisocerini) (Colombia); Iarucanga mimica (Bates, 1866) (Hemilophini) (Ecuador); Pirangoclytus latithorax (Martins y Galileo, 2008) (Clytini) (Costa Rica); Porangonycha princeps (Bates, 1872) (Hemilophini) (Colombia); Trestonia lateapicata Martins y Galileo, 2010 (Onciderini) (Brasil); Tulcus dimidiatus (Bates, 1865) (Onciderini) (Colombia); Unaporanga cincta Martins y Galileo, 2007 (Hemilophini) (Colombia); Zeale dubia Galileo y Martins, 1997 (Hemilophini) (Colombia); Zonotylus interruptus (Olivier, 1790) (Trachyderini) (Colombia).
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Center for SyStematiC entomology, inC., Gainesville, FL
Date of Issue: April 6, 2012
Insecta
MundI A Journal of World Insect Systematics
0231
New Taxa and Combinations in Onciderini Thomson, 1860 (Coleoptera:
Cerambycidae: Lamiinae) from Central and South America, with notes
on additional taxa
Eugenio H. Nearns
Department of Biology
Museum of Southwestern Biology
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, USA
gnearns@unm.edu
Gérard-Luc Tavakilian
Antenne IRD, Entomologie
Département de Systématique et Évolution
Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle
45, rue Buffon
F-75005 Paris
tava@mnhn.fr
Eugenio H. Nearns and Gérard-Luc Tavakilian
New Taxa and Combinations in Onciderini Thomson, 1860 (Coleoptera:
Cerambycidae: Lamiinae) from Central and South America, with notes on
additional taxa
Insecta Mundi 0231: 1–24
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1
0231: 1-24 2012
New Taxa and Combinations in Onciderini Thomson, 1860 (Coleoptera:
Cerambycidae: Lamiinae) from Central and South America, with notes
on additional taxa
Eugenio H. Nearns
Department of Biology
Museum of Southwestern Biology
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, USA
gnearns@unm.edu
Gérard-Luc Tavakilian
Antenne IRD, Entomologie
Département de Systématique et Évolution
Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle
45, rue Buffon
F-75005 Paris
tava@mnhn.fr
Abstract. Touroultia, a new genus of Onciderini Thomson, 1860 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae) is described
and illustrated. Five new species of Onciderini are also described and illustrated: Jamesia ramirezi from Costa
Rica; Peritrox marcelae from French Guiana; Touroultia swifti from Ecuador; Touroultia lordi from French Guiana;
Trestoncideres santossilvai from Brazil. Keys to the known species of Peritrox Bates, 1865; Touroultia gen. nov.; and
Trestoncideres Martins and Galileo, 1990 are provided. The following new synonymies are proposed: Calliphenges
Waterhouse, 1880 (Colobotheini) = Malthonea Thomson, 1864 (Desmiphorini); Paraclytemnestra Breuning, 1974
(Onciderini) = Jamesia Jekel, 1861 (Onciderini); Orteguaza Lane, 1958 (Apomecynini) = Clavidesmus Dillon and
Dillon, 1946 (Onciderini). The following new combinations are proposed: Clavidesmus funerarius (Lane, 1958)
(Onciderini); Clavidesmus lichenigerus (Lane, 1958) (Onciderini); Ischiocentra insulata (Rodrigues and Mermudes,
2011); Malthonea cuprascens (Waterhouse, 1880) (Desmiphorini); Touroultia obscurella (Bates, 1865) (Onciderini).
The following species is restored to original combination: Jamesia lineata Fisher, 1926 (Onciderini). The fol-
lowing 13 new country records are reported: Ataxia hovorei Lingafelter and Nearns, 2007 (Pteropliini) (Haiti);
Carterica soror Belon, 1896 (Colobotheini) (Ecuador); Colobothea lunulata Lucas, 1859 (Colobotheini) (Colombia);
Curius punctatus (Fisher, 1932) (Curiini) (Haiti); Cyclopeplus lacordairei Thomson, 1868 (Anisocerini) (Colombia);
Iarucanga mimica (Bates, 1866) (Hemilophini) (Ecuador); Pirangoclytus latithorax (Martins and Galileo, 2008)
(Clytini) (Costa Rica); Porangonycha princeps (Bates, 1872) (Hemilophini) (Colombia); Trestonia lateapicata Mar-
tins and Galileo, 2010 (Onciderini) (Brazil); Tulcus dimidiatus (Bates, 1865) (Onciderini) (Colombia); Unaporanga
cincta Martins and Galileo, 2007 (Hemilophini) (Colombia); Zeale dubia Galileo and Martins, 1997 (Hemilophini)
(Colombia); Zonotylus interruptus (Olivier, 1790) (Trachyderini) (Colombia).
Key words. Key; Neotropical; New distribution record; New genus; New species; New synonymy; Taxonomy.
Resumen. Touroultia, un nuevo género de Onciderini Thomson, 1860 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae) es
descrito e ilustrado. Cinco nuevas especies de Onciderini son descritas e ilustradas: Jamesia ramirezi de Costa
Rica; Peritrox marcelae de Guayana Francesa; Touroultia swifti de Ecuador; Touroultia lordi de Guayana Francesa;
Trestoncideres santossilvai de Brasil. Claves de las especies de Peritrox Bates, 1865; Touroultia gen. nov.; y Tres-
toncideres Martins y Galileo, 1990; son incluidas. Las siguientes nuevas sinonimias se proponen: Calliphenges
Waterhouse, 1880 (Colobotheini) = Malthonea Thomson, 1864 (Desmiphorini); Paraclytemnestra Breuning, 1974
(Onciderini) = Jamesia Jekel, 1861 (Onciderini); Orteguaza Lane, 1958 (Apomecynini) = Clavidesmus Dillon y Dil-
lon, 1946 (Onciderini). Las siguientes nuevas combinaciones se proponen: Clavidesmus funerarius (Lane, 1958)
(Onciderini); Clavidesmus lichenigerus (Lane, 1958) (Onciderini); Ischiocentra insulata (Rodrigues y Mermudes,
2011); Malthonea cuprascens (Waterhouse, 1880) (Desmiphorini); Touroultia obscurella (Bates, 1865) (Onciderini).
La siguiente especie es restaurada a la combinación original: Jamesia lineata Fisher, 1926 (Onciderini). Los
siguientes 13 nuevos registros de país se reportan: Ataxia hovorei Lingafelter y Nearns, 2007 (Pteropliini) (Haiti);
Carterica soror Belon, 1896 (Colobotheini) (Ecuador); Colobothea lunulata Lucas, 1859 (Colobotheini) (Colombia);
2 Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 nearns and tavakIlIan
Curius punctatus (Fisher, 1932) (Curiini) (Haiti); Cyclopeplus lacordairei Thomson, 1868 (Anisocerini) (Colombia);
Iarucanga mimica (Bates, 1866) (Hemilophini) (Ecuador); Pirangoclytus latithorax (Martins y Galileo, 2008) (Cly-
tini) (Costa Rica); Porangonycha princeps (Bates, 1872) (Hemilophini) (Colombia); Trestonia lateapicata Martins
y Galileo, 2010 (Onciderini) (Brasil); Tulcus dimidiatus (Bates, 1865) (Onciderini) (Colombia); Unaporanga cincta
Martins y Galileo, 2007 (Hemilophini) (Colombia); Zeale dubia Galileo y Martins, 1997 (Hemilophini) (Colombia);
Zonotylus interruptus (Olivier, 1790) (Trachyderini) (Colombia).
Palabras Claves. Clave; Nueva especie; Nueva sinonimia; Nuevo género; Nuevo registro de país; Región neotropi-
cal; Taxonomía.
Introduction
The tribe Onciderini Thomson, 1860 (Cerambycidae: Lamiinae) is widely distributed in the New
World from North America to southern South America. Nearns and Swift (2011) provided a brief review
of the taxonomic history of the tribe. Onciderini currently consists of approximately 468 described spe-
cies in 79 genera. It is worth noting that over half (52) of the 79 genera are either monotypic or have
only two species. A phylogenetic analysis of the tribe has not been conducted and its monophyly remains
untested. A morphological study and cladistic analysis of the tribe is forthcoming (Nearns and Miller
in preparation).
During the process of producing a Lucid key to the genera of Onciderini (Nearns et al. 2011), several
new taxa, taxonomic problems, and distribution records came to light (see Nearns and Swift 2011).
Here we add a new genus and ve new species, propose three synonymies, ve new combinations, and
add 13 new country records in the subfamilies Cerambycinae and Lamiinae.
Materials
Specimens from the following collections were examined and the following codens are used through-
out the paper:
ACMS American Coleoptera Museum, San Antonio, Texas, USA
BMNH The Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom
CMNH Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
CUIC Cornell University Insect Collection, Ithaca, New York, USA
DFPC Denis Faure Private Collection, Kourou, French Guiana
EFGC Edmund F. Giesbert Collection (at FSCA), Gainesville, Florida, USA
ENPC Eugenio H. Nearns Private Collection, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
FSCA Florida State Collection of Arthropods, Gainesville, Florida, USA
INBC Instituto Nacional de Biodiversidad, Santo Domingo de Heredia, Heredia, Costa Rica
ISNB Institut royal des Sciences naturelles de Belgique, Brussels, Belgium
ISPC Ian P. Swift Private Collection, Orange County, California, USA
JLGC Jean-Louis Giuglaris Private Collection, Matoury, French Guiana
JTPC Julien Touroult Private Collection, Soyaux, France
MCNZ Museu de Ciências Naturais, Fundação Zoobotânica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre,
Brazil
MNCR Departamento de Historia Natural, Museo Nacional de Costa Rica, San José, Costa
Rica
MNHN Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, Paris, France
MNRJ Museu Nacional, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
MUSM Museo de Historia Natural Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Peru
MZSP Museu de Zoologia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
NHRS Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden
NMBA Naturhistorisches Museum Basel, Basel, Switzerland
PHDC Pierre-Henri Dalens Private Collection, Rémire-Montjoly, French Guiana
RRCC Rolando Ramírez Campos Private Collection, Veragua, Costa Rica
SMFD Forschungsinstitut und Naturmuseum Senckenberg, Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany
Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 3
new OncIderInI frOM central and sOuth aMerIca
USNM National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, District
of Columbia, USA
ZMHB Museum für Naturkunde der Humboldt-Universität, Berlin, Germany
ZMSC Bavarian State Collection of Zoology, Munich, Germany
ZMUC Zoological Museum University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
Observations of specimens were made using a Max Erb stereomicroscope with 10× eyepieces. Pho-
tographs were taken with Visionary Digital’s Passport Storm imaging system tted with a Canon EOS
40D. Label data are verbatim and placed in quotes. Classication and distributional data are based on
Monné (2005a, 2005b, 2012) and Monné and Bezark (2011).
Taxonomy
Jamesia Jekel, 1861: 259 (Lamiinae: Onciderini)
Type-species. Lamia globifera Fabricius, 1801 (original designation).
The genus Jamesia currently contains nine described species. Nearns et al. (2011) provided color
photographs of seven species of this genus, including four type specimens.
Jamesia ramirezi Nearns and Tavakilian, sp. nov.
(Figures 1a–d)
Description. Female. Length 25.0–27.0 mm (measured from vertex to elytral apices), width 10.5–11.0
mm (measured across humeri). Habitus as in Fig. 1a. General form elongate-ovate, moderate to large-
sized. Integument ferrugineous or dark brown, entire body (except antennae and legs) with tawny
pubescence, mottled with dark brown maculae of various sizes; elytra with two large, dark brown,
irregularly-shaped maculae near middle.
Head with frons elongate, about 3/4 times width of lower eye lobe (as in Fig. 1c). Eyes with lower
lobes large, ovate-oblong. Genae subquadrate to trapezoidal, distinctly shorter than lower eye lobes.
Antennae about 1.3 times longer than body; antennal tubercles prominent, narrowly separated, contigu-
ous at base; tubercles armed at apex with small, blunt tubercle ; scape robust, slightly bowed, gradually
expanded to apex. Antennal formula based on antennomere III: scape=0.80; II=0.06; III=1; IV=0.81;
V=0.63; VI=0.59; VII=0.53; VIII=0.45; IX=0.45; X=0.45; XI=0.45.
Pronotum roughly conical, distinctly wider at base, transverse, about 1.5 times as wide as long,
sides feebly arcuate (Fig. 1d); disk at middle near base with a feebly elevated, median tubercle, either
side of middle with three blunt tubercles arranged in a triangle; one apical and one transverse sulcus,
and a more distinct oblique sulcus laterally which continues down the side.
Scutellum transverse, apex rounded.
Elytra about 1.75 times as long as width at humeri (Fig. 1a), about 4.5 times as long as pronotal
length, about 1.6 times broader basally than pronotum at widest (at base); sides slightly sinuate, dis-
tinctly attenuate to apices, elytral apices individually rounded; base of each elytron somewhat gibbose,
gibbosities each with prominent granules, rest of base with minute scattered granules, widely separated
punctures placed one in each dark brown pubescent spot; humeri prominent, anterior margin oblique,
the angle with a moderate-sized shining tubercle; sides below humeri with a few small granules.
Venter with procoxae large, globose, not uncate; narrowest area of prosternal process between
procoxae about 1/4 as wide as procoxal cavity; apex of prosternal process subtriangular. Mesosternal
process about as wide as mesocoxal cavity; mesosternal process deeply emarginate. Fifth sternite nearly
2 times as long as IV, with a median triangular impression.
Legs moderate in length; femora robust, gradually expanded to apex; tibiae slightly expanded api-
cally; metafemora about 1/3 as long as elytra.
4 Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 nearns and tavakIlIan
Figure 1. Jamesia ramirezi, sp. nov. a) Holotype female, dorsal habitus. b) Allotype male, ventral habitus.
c) Holotype female, close-up of head. d) Holotype female, close-up of pronotum.
Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 5
new OncIderInI frOM central and sOuth aMerIca
Male. Length 20.0–27.0 mm (measured from vertex to elytral apices), width 8.5–11.1 mm (mea-
sured across humeri). Similar to female except antennae 1.5 times longer than body; antennal tubercles
armed at apex with short, blunt horn; pronotum widest behind middle, about 1.3 times as wide as long;
elytra about 4 times as long as pronotal length; larger specimen with profemora transversely rugose;
fth sternite without a median triangular impression.
Type Material. Holotype, female (Fig. 1a, c-d), “Estación Pitilla, 9 km S. Sta. Cecilia, Prov. Guanacaste,
Costa Rica. 700m, Abr. 1994. C. Moraga, LN 330200_380200 #2841” (INBC). Allotype, male (Fig. 1b),
“Costa Rica, Limón, Liverpool, Reserva Veragua Rainforest. 430m.s.n.m. 9º55’35, 7” N - 83º11’27,9”W,
10/VI/2010, Rolando Ramírez Campos leg., #4503” (MNCR). Six paratypes: one male, same data as al-
lotype except “18/VII/2011, #4757” (RRCC); one male, same data as allotype except “22/I/2009, #4185”
(RRCC); one female, same data as holotype except “Mar 1994. #2804” (INBC); one male, same data as
holotype except “P.N. Guanacaste, Ene 1994, #2563” (ENPC); one male, same data as holotype except
“P.N. Guanacaste, May 1994. #2999” (INBC); one female, “Est. Hitoy Cerere, 100m. R. Cerere, Res. Biol.
Hitoy Cerere, Prov. Limón, Costa Rica, 27 jun a 22 jul 1992, K. Taylor, L-N 184200, 643300” (INBC).
Etymology. Jamesia ramirezi, sp. nov. is named for Rolando Ramírez Campos, for his collaboration
and who collected part of the type series. The epithet is a noun in the genitive case.
Diagnosis and Remarks. This species is distinguished from its congeners by the combination of the
following characters: antennomeres I, II, basal 5/6 of III, and basal 2/3 of IV with grayish pubescence,
distinctly lighter than V-XI, which are uniformly dark brown; and elytra with red-orange pubescence,
with small and moderately sized, dark brown maculae outlined with ring of white pubescence. Swift et
al. (2010) listed three species of Jamesia from Costa Rica. Jamesia ramirezi, sp. nov. is described from
eight specimens: ve males and three females. Nothing is known about the habitat and behavior of
this species; however, all known specimens were collected in Costa Rica, above 100 m elevation (three
specimens at 700 m elevation).
Peritrox Bates, 1865: 313 (Lamiinae: Onciderini)
Type species. Peritrox denticollis Bates, 1865 (monotypy).
The genus Peritrox currently contains four described species. Nearns et al. (2011) provided color
photographs of three species of this genus, including two type specimens. The following key was adapted
from Dillon and Dillon (1945) and treats all currently known species of Peritrox including one new species
described herein (the species Peritrox insulatus Rodrigues and Mermudes, 2011, is transferred to the genus
Ischiocentra Thomson herein).
1. Eye with lower lobe less than twice the height of gena; elytra with irregular, vermicular, fulvous
maculae outlined with thin whitish pubescence, interspaces glabrous (Brazil) ............................
....................................................................................P. vermiculatus Dillon and Dillon, 1945
Eye with lower lobe at least twice the height of gena; elytra without vermicular fulvous maculae
.......................................................................................................................................................... 2
2(1). Elytra with fulvous or red-range pubescent maculae ....................................................................... 3
Elytra with only dull reddish pubescent maculae (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay,
Uruguay) .............................................................................................. P. denticollis Bates, 1865
3(2). Antennomeres more or less uniformly dark brown; elytra fulvous, with irregularly shaped dark
brown or black maculae outlined with thin grayish pubescence .................................................. 4
Antennomeres I, II, basal 5/6 of III, and basal 2/3 of IV with grayish pubescence, distinctly lighter
than V-XI, which are uniformly dark brown; elytra with red-orange pubescence, with small
and moderately-sized, dark brown maculae outlined with ring of white pubescence (French
Guiana) ........................................................................................................ P. marcelae, sp. nov.
6 Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 nearns and tavakIlIan
4(3). Front entirely ochraceous pubescent, more densely pubescent laterally; elytra with fulvous
pubescence predominating, a broad, unbroken, hoary fascia placed partly anterior to middle
of its length (Brazil, Ecuador, French Guiana, Peru) .... P. perbra Dillon and Dillon, 1945
Front variegated with white and fulvous pubescence, fulvous vittate laterally; elytra with gray
pubescence predominating, hoary fascia broken, placed behind middle of length (Bolivia,
Brazil, Paraguay) .......................................................... P. nigromaculata Aurivillius, 1920
Peritrox marcelae Nearns and Tavakilian, sp. nov.
(Figures 2a–d)
Description. Male. Length 16.0–17.0 mm (measured from vertex to elytral apices), width 5.5–6.0 mm
(measured across humeri). Habitus as in Fig. 2a. General form elongate-oblong, moderate-sized. In-
tegument dark brown, antennomeres I, II, basal 5/6 of III, and basal 2/3 of IV with grayish pubescence,
distinctly lighter than V-XI, which are uniformly dark brown; elytra with red-orange pubescence, with
dense eld of small and moderately-sized, dark brown maculae outlined with ring of white pubescence;
legs with grayish pubescence; legs with grayish pubescence.
Head with frons distinctly elongate, a little wider than width of one lower eye lobe (as in Fig. 2c).
Eyes with lower lobes large, oblong; narrowest area connecting upper and lower eye lobes about 6 om-
matidia wide. Genae roughly subquadrate, about half as tall as lower eye lobes.
Antennae about 2 times longer than body; antennal tubercles prominent, narrowly separated,
contiguous at base; tubercles armed at apex with short blunt horn; scape robust, gradually expanded
to apex; antennomeres III, X, and XI slightly curved. Antennal formula based on antennomere III:
scape=0.55; II=0.08; III=1; IV=0.72; V=0.6; VI=0.54; VII=0.5; VIII=0.48; IX=0.47; X=0.51; XI=0.77.
Pronotum subcylindrical, slightly wider at base, transverse, about 1.5 times as wide as long, sides
irregular, with a small, blunt protuberance each side behind middle (Fig. 2a, d); disk with ve feebly
elevated tubercles, median tubercle oval, lateral tubercles slightly longer, elongate; disk with 8-10 ne
punctures at basal transverse sulcus.
Scutellum transverse, apex rounded.
Elytra about 2 times as long as width at humeri (Fig. 2a), nearly 4 times as long as pronotal length,
about 1.3 times broader basally than pronotum at widest (at base); lateral margins nearly straight, sides
roughly parallel, gradually rounded to apices at apical 1/3, apices jointly rounded; basal 1/3 of elytra
with moderate punctation, surface nely punctate, with mix of shallow and deep punctures; humeri
prominent, anterior margin arcuate, angle with moderate sized, obtuse tubercle.
Venter with procoxae large, globose, not uncate; narrowest area of prosternal process between
procoxae about 1/6 as wide as procoxal cavity; apex of prosternal process subtriangular. Mesosternal
process about as wide as mesocoxal cavity; mesosternal process subtruncate-rounded. Fifth sternite
slightly longer than IV.
Legs moderate in length; femora robust; metafemora clavate apically; tibiae slightly expanded api-
cally; metafemora about 1/3 as long as elytra.
Female. Length 19.5–24.0 mm (measured from vertex to elytral apices), width 7.5–9.0 mm (mea-
sured across humeri). Similar to male except antennae about 1.5 times as long as body; elytra about
1.5 times broader basally than pronotum at widest (at middle).
Type Material. Holotype, male (Fig. 2a, c), “Montagne de Kaw, 11.XII.82 pk 35 P.L., P. Debost leg.”
(MNHN). Allotype, female (Fig. 2b), “05/I/2011 lumière Piste Kapiri RN2 PK125, J-L Giuglaris leg.”
(PHDC). Four paratypes: one male (Fig. 2d), “Guyane, 05/I/2008 lumière piste de Bélizon PK15+17,
J-L Giuglaris leg.” (JLGC); one male, “Guyane, 06/IX/ 2011 lumière ZA Wayabo Matiti, J-L Giuglaris
leg.” (JLGC); one female, “Guyane, 10/I/1994 lumière route de Kaw PK38, J-L Giuglaris leg.” (JLGC);
one female, “Guyane, 01/IV/2003 lumière piste de Bélizon PK15+12” (JLGC).
Etymology. We are pleased to name this species in honor of Marcela Laura Monné, for her friendship
and many contributions to the study of Neotropical Cerambycidae. The epithet is a noun in the geni-
tive case.
Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 7
new OncIderInI frOM central and sOuth aMerIca
Figure 2. Peritrox marcelae, sp. nov. a) Holotype male, dorsal habitus. b) Allotype female, dorsal habitus.
c) Holotype male, close-up of head. d) Paratype male, dorsal habitus.
8 Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 nearns and tavakIlIan
Diagnosis and Remarks. This species is distinguished from its congeners by the combination of the
following characters: antennomeres I, II, basal 5/6 of III, and basal 2/3 of IV with grayish pubescence,
distinctly lighter than V–XI, which are uniformly dark brown; and elytra with red-orange pubescence,
with small and moderately sized, dark brown maculae outlined with ring of white pubescence. Peritrox
marcelae, sp. nov. is described from six specimens: three males and three females. Nothing is known
about the habitat and behavior of this species; however, all known specimens were collected in French
Guiana, at light.
Touroultia Nearns and Tavakilian, gen. nov. (Lamiinae: Onciderini)
(Figures 4a–d, 5a–d)
Type species. Touroultia lordi, sp. nov., here designated.
Description. General form elongate-ovate, robust, small to moderate-sized. Head with frons elongate,
about 1.5 times width of lower eye lobe. Eyes with lower lobes large, oblong. Genae distinctly shorter
than lower eye lobes. Antennae distinctly longer than body; antennal tubercles prominent, moderately
separated; scape robust, clavate; antennomere III longest. Pronotum subcylindrical, transverse, sides
feebly sinuate; disk with three tubercles; disk with one basal transverse sulcus, and a more distinct
oblique sulcus laterally which continues down the side. Scutellum transverse, apex rounded. Elytra
with lateral margins slightly sinuate, gradually rounded to apices at apical 1/3; humeri prominent. Legs
moderate in length; profemora robust; meso- and metafemora clavate apically; tibiae slightly expanded
apically; metafemora about 1/3 as long as elytra.
The following key treats all currently known species including two new species described herein.
1. Genae roughly transverse, about 1/3 as tall as lower eye lobes; elytra with basal gibbosities
moderately elevated .................................................................................................................... 2
Genae roughly subquadrate, about 1/2 as tall as lower eye lobes; elytra with basal gibbosities
feebly elevated (Brazil) .............................. T. obscurella (Bates, 1865), new combination
2(1). Base of antennomeres IV-XI with grayish or pale testaceous pubescence; base of elytra with
surface coarsely, moderately to deeply, granulate-punctate (French Guiana) .........................
.........................................................................................................................T. lordi, sp. nov.
Base of antennomeres IV-XI with golden-yellow pubescence; base of elytra with surface nely,
shallowly, granulate-punctate (Ecuador) .....................................................T. swifti, sp. nov.
Etymology. Touroultia, gen. nov. is named for Julien Touroult, with appreciation of his friendship and
collaboration. The gender is feminine.
Diagnosis and Remarks. This genus closely resembles Priscatoides Dillon and Dillon, 1945 (Fig.
3a-d) but can be distinguished by the combination of the following characters: genae distinctly shorter
than lower lobes, from 1/3 to 1/2 as tall (genae slightly shorter than lower eye lobes in Priscatoides);
frons distinctly elongate and narrow, about as wide as width of 1 to 1.5 lower eye lobes (frons about as
wide as width of two lower eye lobes in Priscatoides); pronotum subcylindrical in Touroultia (slightly
narrower at apex in Priscatoides); elytra about 3.75 times longer than pronotal length (about 4.3 times
longer in Priscatoides).
Touroultia lordi Nearns and Tavakilian, sp. nov.
(Figures 4a, c)
Description. Male. Length 14.0–14.5 mm (measured from vertex to elytral apices), width 6.0–6.25
mm (measured across humeri). Habitus as in Fig. 4a. General form elongate-ovate, moderate-sized.
Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 9
new OncIderInI frOM central and sOuth aMerIca
Figure 3. Priscatoides tatila Dillon and Dillon, 1945, holotype female. a) Dorsal habitus. b) Lateral habitus
with original labels. c) Close-up of head. d) Close-up of pronotum.
10 Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 nearns and tavakIlIan
Integument dark brown or black, with pale testaceous and dark brown variegated pubescence; base
of antennomeres with grayish or pale testaceous pubescence; elytra dark brown pubescence, with two
irregularly-shaped, distinct regions of pale testaceous pubescence near middle.
Head with frons elongate, about 1.5 times width of lower eye lobe (as in Fig. 4c). Eyes with lower
lobes large, oblong; narrowest area connecting upper and lower eye lobes about 4 ommatidia wide.
Figure 4. Two species of Touroultia, gen. nov. a) T. lordi, sp. nov., holotype male, dorsal habitus. b) T. swifti,
sp. nov., holotype male, dorsal habitus. c) T. lordi, sp. nov., holotype male, close-up of head. d) T. swifti, sp. nov.,
holotype male, close-up of head.
Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 11
new OncIderInI frOM central and sOuth aMerIca
Genae roughly subquadrate, about 1/3 as tall as lower eye lobes.
Antennae distinctly longer than body; antennal tubercles prominent, moderately separated; tu-
bercles unarmed at apex; scape robust, clavate; antennomere III sinuate. Antennal formula based on
antennomere III: scape=0.84; II=0.15; III=1; IV=0.85; V=0.76; VI=0.73; VII=0.74; VIII=0.74; IX=0.77;
X=0.79; XI=0.87.
Pronotum subcylindrical, transverse, about 1.25 times as wide as long, sides feebly sinuate; disk
with three moderately elevated tubercles, median tubercle oval, lateral tubercles more prominent; one
basal transverse sulcus, and a more distinct oblique sulcus laterally which continues down the side.
Scutellum transverse, apex rounded.
Elytra about 1.6 times as long as width at humeri (Fig. 4a), about 3.75 times as long as pronotal
length, about 1.6 times broader basally than pronotum at widest (at base); lateral margins slightly
sinuate, gradually rounded to apices at apical 1/3, apices individually rounded; base of each elytron
with a moderate gibbosity; basal 1/3 of elytra with surface coarsely, moderately to deeply, granulate-
punctate; humeri prominent, anterior margin oblique, angle with moderate sized, obtuse tubercle.
Venter with procoxae large, globose, with small, obtuse tubercle; narrowest area of prosternal pro-
cess between procoxae, about 1/5 as wide as procoxal cavity; apex of prosternal process subtriangular.
Mesosternal process about 0.75 times as wide as mesocoxal cavity; mesosternal process feebly emargin-
ate. Fifth sternite slightly longer than IV, apex feebly emarginate.
Legs moderate in length; profemora robust; meso- and metafemora clavate apically; tibiae slightly
expanded apically; metafemora about 1/3 as long as elytra.
Female. Length 17.0 mm (measured from vertex to elytral apices), width 7.5 mm (measured across
humeri). Similar to male except antennae about 1.3 times as long as body; procoxae without tubercle;
elytra about 1.75 times broader basally than pronotum at widest (at middle); fth sternite about 1.5
times as long as IV, with a median triangular impression.
Type Material. Holotype, male (Fig. 4a, c), “Piste Coralie pk 12, 8 Janvier 1988, Guyane, Piégeage
lumineux, Odette Baloup leg.” (MNHN). Allotype, female, “Guyane F. Route de Kaw, PK 33, battage,
19-27-XII-2003, Touroult leg.” (JTPC). Two paratypes: one male, “French Guiana, PK 37-40, Rte de
Kaw, Jan 25-Feb 1, 1995, E. Giesbert, F. Hovore” (ENPC); one male, “Montagne des Chevaux GF, piège
à vitre, 08/II/2009, P.-H. Dalens leg.” (PHDC).
Etymology. We take pleasure in naming this species for Nathan Patrick Lord, for his friendship and
companionship on many collecting trips. The epithet is a noun in the genitive case.
Diagnosis and Remarks. This species is distinguished from its congeners by the combination of the
following characters: base of antennomeres IV-XI with grayish or pale testaceous pubescence; base of
elytra with surface coarsely, deeply, granulate-punctate genae roughly transverse, about 1/3 as tall as
lower eye lobes; elytra with basal gibbosities strongly elevated. Touroultia lordi, sp. nov. is described
from four specimens: three males and one female. Nothing is known about the habitat and behavior
of this species; however, the holotype specimen was collected at light and the allotype specimen was
collected beating vegetation.
Touroultia obscurella (Bates, 1865), new combination
(Figures 5a–d)
Hypselomus obscurellus Bates, 1865: 169.
Type locality: Brazil, Pará: Óbidos. (MNHN). Distribution: Brazil (Pará).
Hypsioma obscurella (Bates, 1865); Lacordaire 1872: 676; Dillon and Dillon 1946: 206; Martins and
Galileo 1990: 56.
Hypsioma ? obscurella; Breuning 1961: 208 (cat.).
Description. Male? Length 11.0 mm (measured from vertex to elytral apices), width 4.9 mm (measured
across humeri). Habitus as in Fig. 5a. General form elongate-ovate, small-sized. Integument ferrugine-
12 Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 nearns and tavakIlIan
Figure 5. Touroultia obscurella (Bates, 1865), holotype male? a) Dorsal habitus with original labels. b)
Lateral habitus. c) Close-up of head. d) Close-up of pronotum.
Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 13
new OncIderInI frOM central and sOuth aMerIca
ous or dark brown, with grayish and pale testaceous pubescence; base of antennomeres with grayish
pubescence; elytra with predominantly dark brown pubescence, with two feebly dened regions of pale
testaceous pubescence near middle.
Head with frons elongate, about 1.5 times width of lower eye lobe (as in Fig. 5d). Eyes with lower
lobes large, oblong; narrowest area connecting upper and lower eye lobes about 4 ommatidia wide.
Genae roughly subquadrate, about 1/2 as tall as lower eye lobes.
Antennae about 1.3 times longer than body (estimated); tubercles prominent, moderately separated;
tubercles unarmed at apex; scape robust, clavate; antennomere III sinuate. Antennal formula based
on antennomere III: scape=0.73; II=0.13; III=1; IV=0.82; V=0.7; VI=0.57 (specimen damaged, anten-
nomeres VII-XI missing).
Pronotum subcylindrical, transverse, about 1.25 times as wide as long, sides feebly sinuate; disk
with three moderately elevated tubercles, median tubercle oval, lateral tubercles more prominent; one
basal transverse sulcus, and a more distinct oblique sulcus laterally which continues down the side.
Scutellum transverse, apex rounded.
Elytra about 1.85 times as long as width at humeri (Fig. 5b), about 3.75 times as long as pronotal
length, about 1.6 times broader basally than pronotum at widest (at base); lateral margins slightly
sinuate, gradually rounded to apices at apical 1/3, apices individually rounded; base of each elytron
with a moderate gibbosity; basal 1/3 of elytra with dense punctation, surface nely granulate-punctate;
humeri prominent, anterior margin oblique, angle with moderate sized, obtuse tubercle.
Venter with procoxae large, globose, not uncate. Abdomen unavailable for study (specimen dam-
aged).
Legs moderate in length; profemora robust; meso- and metafemora clavate apically; tibiae slightly
expanded apically; metafemora about 1/3 as long as elytra.
Female. Unknown.
Material Examined. Holotype , male? (Fig. 5a-d), “Hypselomus obscurellus, Obydos / Bates; obscurel-
lus Bates Am. N.H.; Museum Paris Coll. H.W. Bates 1952” (MNHN).
Diagnosis and Remarks. This species is distinguished from its congeners by the combination of the
following characters: genae roughly subquadrate, about 1/2 as tall as lower eye lobes; elytra with basal
gibbosities feebly elevated. Touroultia obscurella (Bates, 1865) is described from a single specimen col-
lected at “Obydos” (Brazil, Pará: Óbidos) and originally described in the genus Hypselomus Perty, 1832
(Onciderini). Although the original description indicates the holotype specimen is male, this remains
unconrmed due to specimen damage. Breuning (1961) indicated doubt about the placement of this
species in the genus Hypsioma Audinet-Serville, 1835 (Onciderini).
Touroultia swifti Nearns and Tavakilian, sp. nov.
(Figures 4b, d)
Description. Male. Length 14.0 mm (measured from vertex to elytral apices), width 5.8 mm (measured
across humeri). Habitus as in Fig. 4b. General form elongate-ovate, moderate-sized. Integument dark
brown or black, with pale testaceous and dark brown variegated pubescence; pedicel, base of scape and
antennomere III with grayish pubescence; base of antennomeres IV-XI with golden-yellow pubescence;
elytra with predominantly dark brown pubescence, with two feebly dened regions of pale testaceous
pubescence near middle.
Head with frons elongate, about width of 1 lower eye lobe (as in Fig. 4d). Eyes with lower lobes
distinctly large, oblong; narrowest area connecting upper and lower eye lobes about 4 ommatidia wide.
Genae transverse, about 1/3 as tall as lower eye lobes.
Antennae about 1.5 times longer than body; antennal tubercles prominent, moderately separated;
tubercles armed at apex with short blunt tooth; scape robust, clavate; antennomere III sinuate. Anten-
nal formula based on antennomere III: scape=0.67; II=0.16; III=1; IV=0.85; V=0.82; VI=0.7; VII=0.55;
VIII=0.56; IX=0.63; X=0.65; XI=0.71.
14 Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 nearns and tavakIlIan
Pronotum subcylindrical, transverse, about 1.25 times as wide as long, sides feebly sinuate; disk
with three moderately elevated tubercles, median tubercle oval, lateral tubercles more prominent; one
basal transverse sulcus, and a more distinct oblique sulcus laterally which continues down the side.
Scutellum transverse, apex rounded.
Elytra about 1.6 times as long as width at humeri (Fig. 4b), about 3.75 times as long as pronotal
length, about 1.6 times broader basally than pronotum at widest (at base); lateral margins slightly
sinuate, gradually rounded to apices at apical 1/3, apices individually rounded; base of each elytron with
a moderately-elevated gibbosity; basal 1/3 of elytra with dense punctation, surface nely granulate-
punctate; humeri prominent, anterior margin oblique, angle with moderate sized, obtuse tubercle.
Venter with procoxae large, globose, with small, acute tubercle; narrowest area of prosternal process
between procoxae distinctly narrow, about 1/10 as wide as procoxal cavity; apex of prosternal process
subtriangular. Mesosternal process about 0.75 times as wide as mesocoxal cavity; mesosternal process
feebly emarginate. Fifth sternite slightly longer than IV, apex feebly emarginate.
Legs moderate in length; profemora robust; meso- and metafemora feebly clavate apically; tibiae
slightly expanded apically; metafemora about 1/3 as long as elytra.
Female. Length 17.0 mm (measured from vertex to elytral apices), width 7.5 mm (measured across
humeri). Similar to male except antennae about 1.25 times as long as body; procoxae without tubercle;
fth sternite about 1.5 times as long as IV, with a median triangular impression.
Type Material. Holotype, male (Fig. 4b), “Ecuador, Napo Prov., 24km E. Atahualpa, 450m, Sept 20-
22, 1996, E. Giesbert, coll.” (EFGC). Allotype, female, “Ecuador, Napo Pr., 1 km W Coca, 08 Oct 1997,
F.T. Hovore, coll.” (ENPC).
Etymology. We are pleased to name this species for Ian Patrick Swift, with appreciation of his friend-
ship, encouragement, and camaraderie in the eld. The epithet is a noun in the genitive case.
Diagnosis and Remarks. This species is distinguished from its congeners by the combination of the
following characters: genae transverse, about 1/3 as tall as lower eye lobes; base of antennomeres IV-XI
with golden-yellow pubescence; base of elytra with surface nely, shallowly, granulate-punctate; elytra
with basal gibbosities moderately elevated. Touroultia swifti, sp. nov. is described from two specimens:
one male and one female. Nothing is known about the habitat and behavior of this species; however,
both specimens were collected in Ecuador and the male specimen was collected at 450 m elevation.
Trestoncideres Martins and Galileo, 1990: 87 (Lamiinae: Onciderini)
Type species. Trestoncideres laterialba Martins and Galileo, 1990 (monotypy and original designation).
The genus Trestoncideres currently contains two described species. Nearns et al. (2011) provided color
photographs of both species, including the holotype specimen of Trestoncideres laterialba Martins and
Galileo, 1990 and a paratype specimen of Trestoncideres albiventris Martins and Galileo, 2005. The
following key treats all currently known species of Trestoncideres including one new species described
herein.
1. Antennae, pronotum, and elytra with whitish and gold pubescence; pronotum with a small, acute
protuberance each side behind middle; scutellum with central 1/2 glabrous, outer margins
fringed with grayish or whitish pubescence; apical 1/3 of elytra slightly darker (Brazil, French
Guiana) ............................................................................................... T. santossilvai, sp. nov.
Antennae, pronotum, and elytra without grayish-white and gold pubescence; pronotum without
acute protuberances each side; scutellum pubescent, with at most a small glabrous area at
center; apical 1/3 of elytra not slightly darker .......................................................................... 2
Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 15
new OncIderInI frOM central and sOuth aMerIca
2(1). Base of each elytron with moderately raised gibbosity; elytral gibbosities with orange pubescence,
together forming an elongate-cordate region; elytra (excluding gibbosities) with nearly uniform
ochraceous or light brown pubescence (Bolivia) ..........................................................................
..............................................................................T. albiventris Martins and Galileo, 2005
Elytra with nearly uniformly pale orange pubescence (Brazil, Costa Rica, French Guiana,
Suriname) .............................................................. T. laterialba Martins and Galileo, 1990
Trestoncideres santossilvai Nearns and Tavakilian, sp. nov.
(Figures 6a–d)
Description. Male. Length 12.0–13.0 mm (measured from vertex to elytral apices), width 3.5–4.0 mm
(measured across humeri). Habitus as in Fig. 6a. General form elongate-oblong, small to moderate-
sized. Integument generally dark brown or black, with whitish, gold, and ochraceous pubescence;
mesepisternum, mesepimeron, metepisternum with dark brown and gold pubescence; metasternum
with distinct vitta formed by dense, white pubescence, about as wide as metepisternum, not reaching
margin with metepisternum (Fig. 6b); lateral margin of metasternum with dark brown and gold pubes-
cence; remaining portions of venter and femora with whitish pubescence; apical 1/3 of elytra slightly
darker than basal 2/3.
Head with frons roughly subquadrate, slightly transverse, about 3 times width of lower eye lobe (as
in Fig. 6c). Eyes with lower lobes moderate-sized, ovate; narrowest area connecting upper and lower
eye lobes about 2-3 ommatidia wide. Genae elongate, about as tall as lower eye lobes. Antennae about
1.25 times longer than body; antennal tubercles prominent, widely separated; tubercles armed at apex
with short blunt horn; scape robust, clavate; antennomere III curved, slightly sinuate. Antennal formula
based on antennomere III: scape=0.85; II=0.29; III=1; IV=0.76; V=0.72; VI=0.65; VII=0.63; VIII=0.5;
IX=0.53; X=0.47; XI=0.48.
Pronotum roughly subcylindrical, slightly narrower at base, transverse, about 1.4 times as wide
as long, sides irregular, with a small, acute protuberance each side behind middle (Fig. 6d); disk with
median, oval, glabrous region at basal half.
Scutellum transverse, apex rounded; outer margins fringed with whitish pubescence, central 1/2
glabrous.
Elytra about 2 times as long as width at humeri (Fig. 6a), about 3.3 times as long as pronotal length,
about 1.25 times broader basally than pronotum at widest (at base); lateral margins nearly straight,
gradually rounded to apices at apical 1/3, apices jointly rounded; base of each elytron with a feeble
gibbosity; basal 1/3 of elytra with moderate to dense punctation, surface granulate-punctate; humeri
slightly prominent, anterior margin arcuate, angle with small, obtuse tubercle.
Venter with procoxae large, globose, not uncate; narrowest area of prosternal process between
procoxae about 1/4 as wide as procoxal cavity; apex of prosternal process subtriangular. Mesosternal
process about 1/3 as wide as mesocoxal cavity; mesosternal process subtruncate. Fifth sternite about
1.5 times as long as IV, apex feebly emarginate.
Legs short in length; pro- and mesofemora robust; metafemora clavate apically; tibiae expanded
apically; metafemora about 1/4 as long as elytra.
Female. Length 12.0–14.0 mm (measured from vertex to elytral apices), width 4.0–4.5 mm (mea-
sured across humeri). Similar to male except antennae shorter, surpassing elytral apex at antennomere
X; fth sternite about 3 times as long as IV, with a median triangular impression.
Type Material. Holotype, male (Fig. 6a, c–d), “Piste de Belizon, pk 24, 19 septembre 1992, Guyane,
piégeage lumineux, Michel Duranton leg.” (MNHN). Allotype, female (Fig. 6b), “Brazil: Amazonas,
Rio Taruma Mirim, 20 km nw Manaus,02Mar1979, 02º53’S 060º07’W; Black water inundation forest
canopy fogged with Pyrethrum sample #44; Montgomery, Irwin, Schimmel, Krischik, Date, Bacon colls.”
16 Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 nearns and tavakIlIan
Figure 6. Trestoncideres santossilvai, sp. nov. a) Holotype male, dorsal habitus. b) Allotype female, lateral
habitus. c) Holotype male, close-up of head. d) Holotype male, close-up of pronotum.
Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 17
new OncIderInI frOM central and sOuth aMerIca
(USNM). Nine paratypes: one male, “Montsinery FRG Guyane, 24 Juillet 1985, Piégeage lumineux,
P. Souka leg., 0489” (MNHN) ; one male, “Risque-tout (FRG pk19), 7 Mai 1983, Piégeage lumineux,
P. Sarry leg., 0489” (MNHN); one female, “Route de Kaw pk 38, 13 Janvier 1986, Guyane, Piégeage
lumineux, P. Gerdelat leg., 0489” (ENPC); one female, “Piste Risquetout pk 16, 28 Juin 1987, Guyane,
Piégeage lumineux, Marc Thouvenot leg.” (MNHN); one female, “Kaw PK 37, 20-VII-2001, PL” (DFPC);
one male, “Guyane, 12/V/1991 lumière route de Kaw PK47, J-L Giuglaris leg.” (PHDC); one male,
“Guyane, 06/III/1997 lumière RD06 PK19 J-L Giuglaris leg.” (JLGC); one male, “Guyane, 21/VII/1990
lumière Cacao J-L Giuglaris leg.” (JLGC); one female, “Guyane, 15/II/2006 lumière RD06 PK38 J-L
Giuglaris leg.” (JLGC).
Etymology. We take pleasure in naming this species in honor of Antonio Santos-Silva, for his friend-
ship, collaboration, and many contributions to the study of Neotropical Cerambycidae and Disteniidae.
The epithet is a noun in the genitive case.
Diagnosis and Remarks. This species is distinguished from its congeners by the combination of the
following characters: antennae, pronotum, and elytra with whitish and gold pubescence; pronotum
with a small, acute protuberance each side behind middle; scutellum glabrous except for outer mar-
gins, which are fringed with whitish pubescence; and apical 1/3 of elytra slightly darker than basal
2/3. In addition, T. santossilvai can be distinguished from its congeners by the lateral margins of the
metasterna not with dense white pubescence (in T. albiventris and T. laterialba, the dense white pu-
bescence extends to the lateral margins of the metasterna, contiguous with metepisterna); outermost
margin of metepisternum with dark brown and gold pubescence. Trestoncideres santossilvai, sp. nov.
is described from 11 specimens: six males and ve females. Nothing is known about the habitat and
behavior of this species; however, all specimens from French Guiana were collected at light and the
specimen from Brazil was collected by canopy fogging with pyrethrum.
Taxonomic Notes
Clavidesmus Dillon and Dillon, 1946: 293 (Lamiinae: Onciderini)
(Figures 7a–i)
Clavidesmus Dillon and Dillon, 1946: 293. Type species: Eudesmus heterocerus Buquet, 1852.
= Orteguaza Lane, 1958: 10 (Lamiinae: Apomecynini). Type species: Orteguaza lichenigera Lane, 1958,
by original designation, new synonymy.
Discussion. Lane (1958) described the genus Orteguaza and included two species: O. funeraria (Fig.
7c) and O. lichenigera (Fig. 7f). Examination of the holotype specimens of O. funeraria and O. licheni-
gera, as well as the type specimens of all described species of Clavidesmus Dillon and Dillon [C. chicae
Giorgi, 1998 (Fig. 7a); C. columbianus Breuning, 1961 (Fig. 7b); C. heterocerus (Buquet, 1852) (Fig. 7d);
C. indistinctus Dillon and Dillon, 1952 (Fig. 7e); C. metallicus (Thomson, 1868) (Fig. 7g); C. monnei
Giorgi, 1998 (Fig. 7h); and C. rubigineus Dillon and Dillon, 1949 (Fig. 7i)] revealed are no characters to
separate the two genera. Based on close morphological similarities, Orteguaza is here synonymized
with Clavidesmus, creating two new combinations, Clavidesmus funerarius (Lane, 1958) and Cla-
videsmus lichenigerus (Lane, 1958). The known range of Clavidesmus is extended to Central America
(Costa Rica, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama). We believe the genus Clavidesmus is over-split and
in need of a taxonomic revision.
Ischiocentra Thomson, 1861: 382 (Lamiinae: Onciderini)
Ischiocentra Thomson, 1861: 382. Type species: Ischiocentra clavata Thomson, 1861.
Discussion. Rodrigues and Mermudes (2011) described Peritrox insulatus from a single female specimen
collected on “Ilha Grande,” Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Nearns et al. (2011) provided color photographs of
18 Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 nearns and tavakIlIan
Figure 7. Nine species of Clavidesmus Dillon and Dillon, dorsal habitus. a) C. chicae Giorgi,
1998, holotype male. b) C. columbianus Breuning, 1961, holotype female. c) C. funerarius
(Lane, 1958), holotype female. d) C. heterocerus (Buquet, 1852), holotype male. e) C. indistinctus
Dillon and Dillon, 1952, holotype female. f) C. lichenigerus (Lane, 1958), holotype female. g)
C. metallicus (Thomson, 1868), holotype female. h) C. monnei Giorgi, 1998, holotype male. i)
C. rubigineus Dillon and Dillon, 1949, holotype female.
Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 19
new OncIderInI frOM central and sOuth aMerIca
three type specimens of the genus Peritrox. Based on examination of the holotype specimen of the type
species of the genus (Peritrox denticollis Bates, 1865; deposited at the MNHN); and photographs of the
type specimens of Peritrox nigromaculata Aurivillius, 1920; Peritrox perbra Dillon and Dillon, 1945; and
Peritrox vermiculatus Dillon and Dillon, 1945; the genus Peritrox possesses the following characters: eyes
large, oblong; frons elongate, about as wide as 1 1/2 lower eye lobe widths; genae distinctly shorter than
lower eye lobes, about 1/3 as tall; antennal tubercles armed with short, blunt horn; antennal tubercles
narrowly separated, contiguous at base; scape gradually expanded to apex (e.g. Fig. 2a-d).
The three views of the holotype specimen (dorsal habitus, lateral habitus, and close-up of head)
provided by Rodrigues and Mermudes (2011) indicate the eyes of P. insulatus are moderately large; frons
approximately subquadrate, about as wide as 2 1/2 lower eye lobe widths; genae a little shorter than
lower eye lobes, about 3/4 as tall; antennal tubercles unarmed, moderately separated, not contiguous
at base; scape clavate, not gradually expanded to apex.
Based on these morphological differences, the specimen described by Rodrigues and Mermudes
(2011) conforms more closely to characteristics of the genus Ischiocentra Thomson, known from Brazil,
Colombia, Costa Rica, Panama, and Venezuela. Therefore, we propose the new combination Ischio-
centra insulata (Rodrigues and Mermudes, 2011).
Jamesia Jekel, 1861: 259 (Lamiinae: Onciderini)
(Figures 8a–d)
Jamesia Jekel, 1861: 259. Type species: Lamia globifera Fabricius, 1801.
= Paraclytemnestra Breuning, 1974: 239. Type species: Paraclytemnestra gigantea Breuning, 1974, by
monotypy and original designation, new synonymy.
Discussion. Fisher (1926) described Jamesia lineata (Fig. 8a, c) from a single female specimen from
St. Lucia, Lesser Antilles (holotype deposited at USNM). Breuning (1974) described Paraclytemnestra
gigantea from a single female specimen from the Antilles. Tavakilian (1997) studied both holotype speci-
mens, synonymized P. gigantea and proposed the new combination Paraclytemnestra lineata (Fisher,
1926). Reexamination of both holotype specimens, as well as dozens of specimens of all described species
of Jamesia, revealed that both genera share several diagnostic morphological characters: frons elongate,
narrow, about as wide as width of one lower eye lobe; frons surface roughly sculptured; eyes with lower
lobes oblong; genae about as tall or slightly shorter than lower eye lobes; antennal tubercles narrowly
separated, contiguous at base; scape gradually expanded to apex; pronotum transverse, roughly conical,
narrower anteriorly (e.g., Fig. 1a-d, 8b, d). Based on these morphological similarities, we propose that
Jamesia lineata Fisher, 1926 be restored to original combination, and Paraclytemnestra Breuning
becomes a new synonym of Jamesia Jekel.
Malthonea Thomson, 1864: 329 (Lamiinae: Desmiphorini)
(Figures 9a–d)
Malthonea Thomson, 1864: 329. Type species: Malthonea tigrinata Thomson, 1864.
= Calliphenges Waterhouse, 1880: 296 (Colobotheini). Type species: Calliphenges cuprascens Water-
house, 1880, by monotypy, new synonymy.
Discussion. The monotypic genus Calliphenges was described by Waterhouse (1880) and placed in
Colobotheini. Examination of the holotype specimen of Calliphenges cuprascens Waterhouse, 1880
(collected at Chiguinda, Ecuador and deposited at the BMNH) (Fig. 9a-d) revealed no characters to
distinguish it from the genus Malthonea. Martins and Galileo (1995) reviewed the genus Malthonea,
providing diagnostic morphological characters and a key to species. Calliphenges cuprascens is here
transferred to Malthonea, creating the new combination Malthonea cuprascens (Waterhouse, 1880),
and Calliphenges Waterhouse becomes a new synonym of Malthonea Thomson.
20 Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 nearns and tavakIlIan
Figure 8. Two species of Jamesia Jekel, 1861. a) J. lineata Fisher, 1926, holotype female, dorsal habitus
with original labels. b) J. globifera Jekel, 1861, female, dorsal habitus. c) J. lineata Fisher, 1926, holotype,
close-up of head. d) J. globifera Jekel, 1861, female, close-up of head.
Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 21
new OncIderInI frOM central and sOuth aMerIca
Figure 9. Malthonea cuprascens (Waterhouse, 1880), holotype. a) Dorsal habitus. b) Lateral habitus with
original labels. c) Close-up of head. d) Close-up of pronotum
22 Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 nearns and tavakIlIan
New Distribution Records in Cerambycidae
Ataxia hovorei Lingafelter and Nearns, 2007 (Lamiinae: Pteropliini) is recorded from Haiti,
new country record. One male specimen (MNHN), “Haïti, ex. museao E. Sallé, 1897, coll. A. Sallé,
Museum-Paris.” This species was previously believed to be endemic to Dominican Republic (Lingafelter
and Nearns 2007; Monné and Bezark 2011).
Carterica soror Belon, 1896 (Lamiinae: Colobotheini) is recorded from Ecuador, new country
record. One specimen (BMNH), “Ecuador: Pichincha, Nambillo Valley near Mindo, 1450m., 13.viii.1987,
M. Cooper.” This species was previously recorded from Bolivia and Peru (Monné 2005b; Monné and
Bezark 2011).
Colobothea lunulata Lucas, 1859 (Lamiinae: Colobotheini) is recorded from Colombia, new
country record. One female specimen (BMNH), “Colombia: Meta, La Macarena, 15.3.76, M. Cooper.”
This species was previously recorded from Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, and Peru (Monné 2005b; Monné
and Bezark 2011).
Curius punctatus (Fisher, 1932) (Cerambycinae: Curiini) is recorded from Haiti, new country
record. One female specimen (MNHN), “Haiti, Gonaïves.” This species was previously believed to be
endemic to Cuba (Monné 2005a; Monné and Bezark 2011; Nearns and Branham 2008).
Cyclopeplus lacordairei Thomson, 1868 (Lamiinae: Anisocerini) is recorded from Colombia, new
country record. One female specimen (BMNH), “Colombia: Amazonas, Tarapaca, 1/10/76, M. Cooper.”
This species was previously recorded from Bolivia, Ecuador, French Guiana, and Peru (Monné 2005b;
Monné and Bezark 2011).
Iarucanga mimica (Bates, 1866) (Lamiinae: Hemilophini) is recorded from Ecuador, new country
record. One specimen (BMNH), “Ecuador: Morona-Santiago, Cord. de Cutucu 6K. e. of Macas, 1,100m,
12.v.1981, M. Cooper.” This species was previously recorded from Bolivia, Brazil, and French Guiana
(Monné 2005b; Monné and Bezark 2011).
Pirangoclytus latithorax (Martins and Galileo, 2008) (Cerambycinae: Clytini) is recorded
from Costa Rica, new country record. One specimen (BMNH) “Costa Rica: Guanacaste, Golto, iii,
M. Cooper.” This species was previously believed to be endemic to Panama (Monné and Bezark 2011).
Porangonycha princeps (Bates, 1872) (Lamiinae: Hemilophini) is recorded from Colombia, new
country record. One specimen (BMNH), “Colombia: Nariño, Barbarcoas, 40m, 7.X.1990, M. Cooper.”
This species was previously recorded from Bolivia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, French Guiana, Nicaragua,
and Peru (Monné and Bezark 2011; Monné et al. 2012).
Trestonia lateapicata Martins and Galileo, 2010 (Lamiinae: Onciderini) is recorded from Brazil,
new country record. One male specimen (MNHN), “Brésil, Ét. de Goyaz, Jatahy, Museum Paris,
Coll. E. Gounelle 1915.” This species was previously known from Bolivia (Monné and Bezark 2011).
Tulcus dimidiatus (Bates, 1865) (Lamiinae: Onciderini) is recorded from Colombia, new country
record. One female specimen (MNHN), “S.E. Columbia, Putumayo Superior, Muséum Paris 1932 Col.
R. Oberthur.” This species was previously known from Brazil and Ecuador (Monné 2005b; Monné and
Bezark 2011).
Unaporanga cincta Martins and Galileo, 2007 (Lamiinae: Hemilophini) is recorded from Co-
lombia, new country record. One male specimen (BMNH), “Colombia: Nariño, Barbarcoas, 40m,
20.iv.1993, M. Cooper.” This species was previously recorded from Panama (Monné and Bezark 2011).
Insecta MundI 0231, April 2012 23
new OncIderInI frOM central and sOuth aMerIca
Zeale dubia Galileo and Martins, 1997 (Lamiinae: Hemilophini) is recorded from Colombia, new
country record. One specimen (BMNH), “Colombia: Putamayo, Mocoa, 580m. 5.4.76, M. Cooper.” This
species was previously recorded from Bolivia (Monné 2005b; Monné and Bezark 2011).
Zonotylus interruptus (Olivier, 1790) (Cerambycinae: Trachyderini) is recorded from Colombia,
new country record. One specimen (BMNH), “Colombia: Amazonas, Leticia, 24.8.74, M. Cooper.” This
species was previously recorded from Brazil and French Guiana (Monné 2005a; Monné and Bezark
2011; Morvan and Morati 2011: 39, g. 108).
Acknowledgments
We greatly appreciate the loan of specimens and assistance from Ian P. Swift (ISPC), Steven W.
Lingafelter (Systematic Entomology Lab, USNM), James E. Wappes (ACMS), Miguel A. Monné and
Marcela L. Monné (MNRJ), Ubirajara R. Martins and Antonio Santos-Silva (MZSP), Thierry Deuve
and Azadeh Taghavian (MNHN), Sharon Shute, Max Barclay, and Roger Booth (BMNH), Michael C.
Thomas and Paul E. Skelley (FSCA), Stewart B. Peck (Ottawa, Canada), Larry G. Bezark (Sacramento,
CA, USA), Gerardo Lamas and Sarah C. Carbonel Carril (MUSM), Álvaro Herrera and Ángel Solís
(INBC), Damir Kovac and Andrea Hastenpug-Vesmanis (SMFD), Maria Helena M. Galileo (MCNZ),
Bert Viklund (NHRS), Johannes Frisch (ZMHB), Alexey Solodovnikov (ZMUC), David Furth (USNM),
Michael Balke (ZMSC), Dilma Solange Napp (Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil), Adriano
Giorgi (Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil), Jose Ricardo M. Mermudes (Uni-
versidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), Robert L. Davidson (CMNH), E. Richard
Hoebeke (CUIC), Eva Sprecher and Isabelle Zürcher-Pfander (NMBA), Alain Drumont and Pol Limbourg
(ISNB), Stewart B. Peck (Ottawa, Canada), Pierre-Henri Dalens (PHDC), Jean-Louis Giuglaris (JLGC),
José R. Esteban Duran (Madrid, Spain), and Denis Faure (DFPC). We are especially grateful to the
late Frank T. Hovore for loan of material from Ecuador. For assistance with specimen photography, we
thank Nathan P. Lord (University of New Mexico, NM, USA), Rolando Ramírez Campos (RRCC) and
the late Pierre Buirette. Miguel A. Monné (MNRJ), Antonio Santos-Silva (MZSP), Alicia M. Hodson
(University of New Mexico, NM, USA), and Paul E. Skelley (FSCA) provided helpful comments to a
previous version of this manuscript. For funding and support of this research we thank Terrence W.
Walters and Amanda J. Redford (U.S. Department of Agriculture / Animal and Plant Health Inspection
Service), Kelly B. Miller and Nathan P. Lord (University of New Mexico, NM, USA).
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Received March 7, 2012; Accepted March 13, 2012.
... Recent work by Lingafelter et al. (2014), Nearns and Androw (2013), Nearns and Maier (2016), Nearns and Swift (2011), Nearns and Tavakilian (2012a, 2012b, 2015a, 2015b, Nearns and Santos-Silva (2016), has resulted in the photography of nearly all Onciderini primary type specimens. In this work, we present the 19 primary types of Onciderini deposited at the Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ), Harvard University. ...
... The following identifi cation key was adapted from Nearns & Tavakilian (2012) and treats all currently known species of Peritrox including one new species described herein. ...
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