Article

Diagnosis and management of a partial patella ligament rupture in a dog

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Abstract

Patella ligament injuries are an uncommon cause of stifle disease in dogs. This report describes the diagnostic imaging and surgical management of a three-year-old working dog that was presented with a three week history of acute lameness, isolated to the stifle. Radiology and ultrasound were used to diagnose a partial tear to the musculotendinous insertion of the quadriceps tendon on the proximal patella. Also, a tear was present just proximal to the patella ligament insertion on the tibia. Surgical treatment was undertaken involving suturing the torn portion of the ligament and augmentation of the repair with orthopaedic wire. Post-operative complications included infection and wire irritation. Five months following surgery, the owners reported full functional recovery.

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