ArticlePDF Available

Families and subfamilies of Coleoptera (with selected genera, notes, references and data on family-group names)

Authors:
A preview of the PDF is not available
... Later, Morón and Valenzuela (1993) estimated that at least 35,000 beetle species are in Mexico. Navarrete-Heredia and Fierros-López (2001) listed and commented on families from Mexico; 114 families were recorded from Mexico, more than Brazil (104), Australia (113), or New Zealand (82) (following classification by Lawrence and Newton 1995). Comments on known or expected diversity were provided for a few families. ...
... b) Titles of papers sometimes appear in the database written completely in capital letters because some journals use the system in titles. (Lawrence andNewton 1995, Bouchard et al. 2017) and recognized by many authors. However, in other cases papers dealing with Scydmaeninae of Staphylinidae, as proposed several years ago (Grebennikov and Newton 2009), are included in Scydmaenidae by Zoological Record. ...
Article
Full-text available
Patterns of description of new species of beetles from Mexico between 2000-2020 were analyzed. We based our study on the Zoological Record of Web of Science TM. We found 1,867 species in 61 families described in 759 papers published in scientific journals from all over the world. Scarabaeidae is the family with the most species described (352) in the last two decades, followed by Staphylinidae (198), Curculionidae (196), Cleridae (176), and Cerambycidae (175). Most species of Mexican beetle were described in Zootaxa, Coleopterists Bulletin, Insecta Mundi, Dugesiana, and Zookeys. We also provided comments on issues to consider when Zoological Record is used for analysis such as in this study.
... Other references used for beetle identification include keys by Lawrence and Newton (1995), Lawrence et al. (2000), and Chung (2003). Specimen collections are stored at the Entomology lab, University Malaysia Sabah. ...
... Note: The classification of families is based on Lawrence and Newton (1995), Lawrence et al. (2000), and Chung (2003). ...
Article
Full-text available
While reforestation is gaining momentum to moderate climate change via carbon sequestration, there is also an opportunity to use tree planting to confront declining global biodiversity. Where tree species vary in support of diversity, selecting appropriate species for planting could increase conservation effectiveness. We used a common garden experiment in Borneo using 24 native tree species to examine how variation among tree species in their support of beetle diversity is predicted by plant traits associated with “acquisitive” and “conservative” resource acquisition strategies. We evaluate three hypotheses: (1) beetle communities show fidelity to host identity as indicated by variation in abundance and diversity among tree species, (2) the leaf economic spectrum partially explains this variation as shown by beetle preferences for plant species that are predicted by plant traits, and (3) a small number of selected tree species can capture higher beetle species richness than a random tree species community. We found high variation among tree species in supporting three highly intercorrelated metrics of beetle communities: abundance, richness, and Shannon diversity. Variation in support of beetle communities was predicted by plant traits and varied by plant functional groups; within the dipterocarp family, high beetle diversity was predicted by conservative traits such as high wood density and slow growth, and in non‐dipterocarps by the acquisitive traits of high foliar K and rapid growth. Using species accumulation curves and extrapolation to twice the original sample size, we show that 48 tree species were not enough to reach asymptote levels of beetle richness. Nevertheless, species accumulation curves of the six tree species with the highest richness had steeper slopes and supported 33% higher richness than a random community of tree species. Reforestation projects concerned about conservation can benefit by identifying tree species with a disproportional capacity to support biodiversity based on plant traits. The functional relationship between plant diversity and diversity of organisms in higher trophic levels is a fundamental ecological question of what is important for understanding the contribution of restoration of plant communities for conservation. We show that tropical tree species vary in the level of diversity that they support and that this variation can be predicted by plant traits. We further illustrate how such variation can be utilized to increase the conservation value of plant diversity in restoration.
... The Tenebrionoidea constitute one of the largest and most complex superfamilies of beetles [1,2]. A molecular study on the superfamily suggested that it is monophyletic and that four clades have been suggested within the group; among these clades, ripiphorid-mordellidmeloid were considered the most basal in the superfamily [3]. ...
Article
Full-text available
The sperm ultrastructure of a few representative species of Tenebrionoidea was studied. Two species belong to the Mordellidae (Mordellistena brevicauda and Hoshihananomia sp.), one species to Oedemeridae (Oedemera nobilis), and one species to Tenebrionidae (Accanthopus velikensis). It is confirmed that Mordellidae are characterized by the lowest number of spermatozoa per cyst (up to 64), a number shared with Ripiphoridae. In contrast, in the two other families, up to 512 spermatozoa per cyst are observed, the same number present, for example, in Tenebrionidae. Also, as in the other more derived families of tenebrionoids studied so far, during spermatogenesis in O. nobilis and A. velikensis, sperm nuclei are regularly distributed in two sets at opposite poles of the cysts. On the contrary, the Mordellidae species do not exhibit this peculiar process. However, during spermiogenesis, the bundles of sperm bend to form a loop in their median region, quite evident in the Hoshihananomia sp., characterized by long sperm. This process, which also occurs in Ripiphoridae, probably enables individuals to produce long sperm without an increase in testicular volume. The sperm looping could be a consequence of the asynchronous growth between cyst size and sperm length. The sperm ultrastructure of the Mordellidae species reveals that they can be differentiated from other Tenebrionoidea based on the shape and size of some sperm components, such as the accessory bodies and the mitochondrial derivatives. They also show an uncommon stiff and immotile posterior flagellar region provided with only accessory tubules. These results contribute to a better knowledge of the phylogenetic relationship of the basal families of the large group of Tenebrionoidea.
... T. oxyurus is a recently discovered species in Croatia, so far relatively unexplored and with little data from the literature, mainly due to its rare occurrence. T. oxyurus is a beetle (Coleoptera) from the subfamily Platypodinae, found within the family Curculionidae [12][13][14]. Sometimes T. oxyurus is placed as an independent family Platypodidae [15][16][17]. T. oxyurus is 4.5-5 mm long, about 1 mm narrow, and cylindrical with an elongated body. ...
Article
Full-text available
Bark beetle outbreak sites were analysed before sanitary logging in Gorski Kotar County during spring, summer and autumn 2021. Downed European silver fir trees were inspected for red-listed saproxylic entomofauna. Among other species, the fir pinhole borer (Treptoplatypus oxyurus, Dufour, 1843) (Coleoptera: Platypodidae) was observed and studied on-site and in the laboratory. Symptoms of T. oxyurus presence were recognised as white filamentous bites of sawdust on the bark of the fir trees and the surrounding soil. Every tree infested infested with T. oxyurus was measured (diameter at breast height, height/length), and its position was recorded. Segments were collected for laboratory analysis to evaluate the layout and position of T. oxyurus gallery system. The results showed that individual corridors of T. oxyurus, as a rule, never intersect, cross or connect. Each family of beetles (male, female and their offspring) lives separately in its corridor system. There were examples of corridors that were very close to each other but did not touch. T. oxyurus is still completely unknown to forest operatives in Croatia, who do not recognise symptoms of its occurrence.
... Tortoise beetles are members of the Cassidinae subfamily which is the second most numerous clade after Galerucinae, comprising approximately 6,000 species distributed into 43 tribes around the world (Chaboo, 2007;Borowiec & Swietojanska, 2019). as tribes, subfamilies, families, and even in a superfamily (Stephens, 1829;Westwood, 1920;Chen, 1964Chen, , 1973Seeno & Wilcox, 1982;Suzuki, 1988;Lawrence & Newton, 1995;Borowiec, 1999). Recently, Chaboo (2007) proposed that the subfamilies Cassidinae s. str. ...
Article
Full-text available
Aedeagus of the type species of seven subgenera in the genus Cassida Linnaeus, 1758 have been studied and figured. Twenty aedeagal structures of these species of were evaluated in detail under both stereo microscope and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).Contrary of popular acceptance, it is demonstrated that the characteristics of the aedeagal structure, which can be obtained with SEM studies especially, can be diagnostic at almost all taxonomic levels The characters; however, will have different values for different taxonomic categories. As a result of this study, seven diverse aedeagal characters are found generally constant within species, but distinct and useful in comparison with other species [as 1. characteristics of apex in dorsal view (D2), 2. general shape in lateral view (L7), 3. the ratio of the distance between posterior margin of the dorsal plate and the apex to the entire length of the median tube in dorsal view (D11), 4. the ratio of the width of apical part to the width of basal part of median lobe in lateral view (L4), 5. the ratio of the width of apex to the width of apical part in dorsal view (D3), 6. surface structure of the apical part in front of orifice including apex in dorsal view (D5), 7. surface structure behind orifice in dorsal view (D6)]. Also, as an important output of the study, it is observed that the type species and therefore the subgenera can be divided chiefly into 3 diverse group based on aedeagal structures: C. seraphina in C.(Alledoya), C. nebusa in C. (s. str.) and C. hemisphaerica in C.(Mionychella) as Group I; C. nobilis in C.(Cassidulella) as Group II; C. viridis in C .(Odontionycha), C. brevisin C.(Onychocassis)and C. murrea in C. (Pseudocassida) as Group III. The new grouping is discussed with the grouping according to host plants and with the grouping in previous stereo microscopic works due to there is no available SEM studies. These previous groupings do not seem to be compatible with the results obtained with this study. Based on the ultrastructure of aedeagus, the genus Cassida Linnaeus, 1758 is a polyphyletic group, not monophyletic.In addition, as a side outcome of the work, Cassida hemispherica Herbst, 1799 is reported for the first time with a verified locality record from Turkey. Moreover, the habitus of adults of the species examined and a diagnostic key to species examined based on the external and aedeagal morphological characters of adults is also provided.
... The genus Sanaungulus was originally placed in the subfamily Cantharinae , according to the five subfamilies system of Cantharidae (Brancucci, 1980;Lawrence and Newton, 1995;Ramsdale, 2002Ramsdale, , 2010Bouchard et al., 2011;Lawrence and Slipi nski, 2013). Most recently, it was assigned to a separated lineage 'Burmite Cantharinae' in incertae sedis by Hsiao et al. (2021) based on a morphology-based phylogeny of Cantharidae. ...
Article
The mid-Cretaceous genus Sanaungulus from northern Myanmar is revised based on a morphology-based phylogeny of the Burmite Cantharinae by both Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood analyses. The monophyly of Sanaungulus is supported and recovered sister to Burmomiles. The generic diagnosis is redefined based on the synapomorphies, of which the characteristic antennal shape is highlighted. The aedeagus of this genus is illustrated for the first time, which is trilobite, composed of a pair of asymmetric and plate-like lateral lobes and a slender median lobe. Five new species are described under the names of S. emarginaticollis sp. nov., S. multiramus sp. nov., S. laticoxa sp. nov., S. imparitibius sp. nov. and S. ruficollis sp. nov. Two species are removed from this genus, including S. ruicheni and S. strungei due to their different antennal characters, of which the former would be placed in incertae sedis of the Burmite Cantharinae because of the inconsistent phylogenetic analyses and the latter be in an unknown genus described in another forthcoming publication. Now ten species are truly included in this genus, and a key to the species is provided. These results will provide more evidence to clarify the phylogenetic position of the Burmite cantharids in the Cantharidae.
... Los insectos que atacan libros, textos y madera de bibliotecas son principalmente los coleópteros, conocidos comúnmente como escarabajos (orden Coleoptera), que constituyen el grupo más numeroso de todos los insectos con más de 350 000 especies descriptas. representan aproximadamente el 40% de todos los insectos conocidos, lo cual hace que sean el principal componen te de la biodiversidad de la tierra y el grupo más exitoso de los insectos (Lawrence & newton, 1995). a este orden pertenecen insectos de tamaño muy variable, de 0,3 mm a 200 mm. ...
Article
In Argentina, the main insects that cause biodegradation in heritage objects are beetles (Anobiidae, Coleoptera). The most frequent species in texts are Tricorynus herbarius (Gorham) and Stegobium paniceum (L.) and in working woods are Anobium punctatum De Geer and Xyletinus brasiliensis Pic. The damage in texts corresponds to galleries in covers, spines and pages and circular holes in spines. In wood they also generate galleries that cause the weakening of the support. Silverfish (Zygentoma) and cockroaches (Blattodea) produce superficial scrapes on texts and faecal spots, and larvae of the clothing moth Tineola bisselliella Hummel (Lepidoptera) feed on bookbinding fabrics. The spider webs collaborate with the accumulation of dirt and the remains and feces of the aforementioned fauna represent a substrate for chemical contamination and the development of other biodeteriorant organisms. The specific identification, the knowledge about the biology and the detection of signs of the actions of these insects, constitute the previous step for the implementation of preventive and curative conservation measures with a view to stopping, minimizing or counteracting the deterioration, ensuring the protection of the materials. Illustrative practical examples of objects of heritage value from Argentina are presented.
Article
The distribution of Bolbelasmus unicornis (Schrank, 1789) is critically reviewed throughout its range with emphasis on the Czech Republic and Slovakia. The species has been reliably recorded from 377 localities in 19 countries. New records are given from 152 localities of Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Turkey, and Ukraine. For Germany, the species is recorded for the first time in 54 years. The occurrence of the species in Switzerland is confirmed by two historical specimens from Zürich. The only known historical specimen labelled “Kaukasus” is given, which could originate from Russia, where this species has not been recorded before (however, confusion of the locality label cannot be ruled out). All published faunistic data from across the range are presented here in full, in several cases supplemented by details subsequently obtained by the author. Distribution maps are compiled separately for the Czech Republic and Slovakia, and for the entire range. A separate map is also available for Hungary, where approximately one-third of the known localities are located. Statistical data concerning the flight activity of adults, seasonal dynamics for part of the distribution area, details of records and notes on the bionomy and ethology of the species are provided. Possible feeding strategies for adults and larvae of B. unicornis are discussed, as well as current knowledge of the natural history of various representatives of the subfamily Bolboceratinae. A monitoring method for the species is proposed.
Article
Full-text available
Lista anotada de las especies y clave para géneros de Limnichidae (Coleoptera: Byrrhoidea) de México.
Article
The stag beetle fossil genus Anisoodontus gen. nov. is described and illustrated as the first member of the subfamily Lucaninae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea: Lucanidae) from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber. Two new species, A. qizhihaoi sp. nov. and A. xiafangyuani sp. nov. are described in the genus, the former species based on a singleton male and the latter on what likely is a male. The two new species are distinguished from other described lucanid fossil species by: antenna geniculate, body slender, elytra with longitudinal grooves, and mandibles asymmetrical. A key is given to distinguish the new genus from other amber genera of Lucanidae. The new genus is considered to be morphologically most similar to the extant genus Figulus Macleay, 1819, but is easily separated by tabulated features. Based on the age of the fossils combined with their morphological features, we suggest that the Lucaninae appeared and began to diversify before the Late Cretaceous, and the decomposition of rotten wood, which was assisted by the stag beetle larvae, contributed to the nutrient circulation and development of forest ecosystems at that time.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.