Article

Corrigenda to “Taxonomic revision of Chenopodiaceae in Nepal” [Phytotaxa 191: 10–44. 2014]

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Abstract

The first treatment of the family Chenopodiaceae for the flora of Nepal (Central and Eastern Himalaya) has been recently published (Sukhorukov & Kushunina 2014). However, after a detailed investigation of original material concerning Chenopodium pallidum Moquin-Tandon (1840: 30), which are part of Jacquemont’s collection from India (Herbarium P), we can state that all these specimens indeed belong to Atriplex Linnaeus (1753: 1052). According to Art. 11 of ICN (McNeill et al. 2012), the name Chenopodium pallidum appears to be an older name at specific rank for Atriplex schugnanica Iljin (1936: 123), and thus a new combination is proposed in the present paper. Besides, new Chenopodium species, previously named Chenopodium pallidum [now Atriplex pallida Moquin-Tandon (1840: 30)], is described from Nepal and dedicated to the prominent Japanese botanist Hiroshi Hara (Chenopodium harai Sukhor.).

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... In our opinion, there are three main options for dealing with the confusing nomenclatural situation created by conflicting lectotypification and epitypification of the name Chenopodium pallidum , 2015. ...
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... Progress towards disentangling the generic composition of Chenopodiaceae in Himalaya and Tibet began with the critical revisions and additions to Axyris (Sukhorukov, 2011), Dysphania (Sukhorukov 2012, Uotila 2013, Sukhorukov et al. 2015b, Nobis et al. 2015, 2017 and part of Chenopodium s. str. Kushunina 2014, 2015). ...
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New species of the family Chenopodiaceae for the flora of the USSR
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McNeill, J., Barrie, F.R., Buck, W.R., Demoulin, V., Greuter, D.L., Hawksworth, D.L., Herendeen, P.S., Knapp, S., Marhold, K., Prado, J., Proud'Homme van Reine, W.F., Smith, J.F. & Wiersema, J.H. (Eds.) (2012) International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (Melbourne Code): Adopted by the Eighteenth International Botanical Congress, Melbourne, Australia, July 2011. Regnum Vegetabile 154: 1−274.
Letters from India; describing a journey in India, Tibet, Lahore and Cashmere, during the years 1828, 1829, 1830, 1831
  • V Jacquemont
Jacquemont, V. (1834) Letters from India; describing a journey in India, Tibet, Lahore and Cashmere, during the years 1828, 1829, 1830, 1831. Edward Churton, London, 378 pp.
2012) International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants
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  • F R Barrie
  • W R Buck
  • V Demoulin
  • D L Greuter
  • D L Hawksworth
  • P S Herendeen
  • S Knapp
  • K Marhold
  • J Prado
McNeill, J., Barrie, F.R., Buck, W.R., Demoulin, V., Greuter, D.L., Hawksworth, D.L., Herendeen, P.S., Knapp, S., Marhold, K., Prado, J., Proud'Homme van Reine, W.F., Smith, J.F. & Wiersema, J.H. (Eds.) (2012) International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (Melbourne Code): Adopted by the Eighteenth International Botanical Congress, Melbourne, Australia, July 2011. Regnum Vegetabile 154: 1−274.