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Compendium of Bivalves 2. A full-color guide to the remaining seven families. A systematic listing of 8'500 bivalve species and 10'500 synonyms

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Abstract

This book completes "Compendium of Bivalves, Volume 1" published in 2010. It adds the 7 families (Thyasiridae, Lucinidae, Galeommatidae, Tellinidae, Cyrenidae, Ungulinidae, Teredinidae) missing from volume 1. It contains major additions and rectifications to the families treated in 2010. It completes the tabulation of biodiversity and biogeography of global Bivalvia. The book now contains the data and synonyms of all marine and brackish water bivalves recognized by the author. Overall 8'500 valid species and 10'500 additional synonymous names are systematically listed with all data currently available. Altogether 45 new species, 33 new genera, 6 new subfamilies and 1 new family are proposed within this book.

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... The family Mytilidae Rafinesque, 1815 is a cosmopolitan group, worldwide distributed (Bernard et al., 1993;Coan et al., 2000;Coan & Valentich-Scott, 2012;Von Cosel & Gofas, 2019;Huber 2010Huber , 2015Rios, 2009;Valentich-Scott et al., 2020) with more than 300 valid species (MolluscaBase, 2022). This is a diverse group adapted from shallow to deep waters. ...
... Kleemann & Maestrati (2012) redefined again Leiosolenus as a subgenus of Lithophaga recognizing that generic separation was still confusing. Despite this, Huber (2015) continued treating Leiosolenus as a valid genus based on genetic analysis made by different authors (Owada, 2007;Liu et al., 2018;Audino et al., 2020). ...
... The suggested subgenera included within Leiosolenus are not definitive. Huber (2015) recognized the subgenera Leiosolenus s. s., Diberus Dall (1898), Labis Dall (1916), Myoforceps P. Fischer (1886Fischer ( in 1880Fischer ( -1887 and Stumpiella Soot-Ryen (1955) based on the pattern of calcareous depositions that cover shell´s surface. The biodiversity of boring Mytilidae was widely studied and their shell morphology was defined by Owada (2007) as lithophagiform based on the relation of different measures, such as length, height, width and vectors related to the byssal retractor muscles. ...
Article
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The taxonomic status and anatomy of Leiosolenus (Labis) patagonicus (d'Orbigny, 1846 in 1834-1847) has been revised. This boring bivalve, belonging to the family Mytilidae, is the only Lithophaginae species distributed along the Argentinean coast. None of the fossil species mentioned for this area must be considered as a synonym of d'Orbigny´s species. Leiosolenus patagonicus is characterized by a thin shell, longitudinally elongated, with subterminal umbos and commarginal striae. The calcareous depositions on the outer surface of the shell are extended beyond the posterior margin. This species has well developed purple siphons, well differentiated morphologically from each other. Incurrent siphon is wider than excurrent, opened at the ventral edge and provided with a basal siphon valve at the base. Two pairs of demibranchs type B (1) from Atkins were observed. The shell characters and internal morphology were compared with other related species of the genus living along the South American coast. Finally, repository, type locality and habitat conditions were informed.
... croulinensis apparently also occurs in the abyssal zone of the Indian Ocean (Arabian Sea) (Oliver, 2015)); Axinulus antarcticus Zelaya, 2010, from the Antarctic waters (from the Ross Sea to South Orkneys, 68-850 m) (Zelaya, 2010); and A. philippinensis, from the Philippine Trench (9,605-9,807 m) (Allen, 2015). Furthermore, Huber (2015) assigned Axinulus subequatorius (Payne & Allen, 1991) to the genus Axinulus; originally, the species was described as Thyasira (Parathyasira) subequatoria Payne & Allen, 1991 from the south Atlantic Ocean (Angola and Argentine Basins) (Payne & Allen, 1991). The shell morphology and anatomy of all the above 6 species were investigated and they all share a number of common features: a small shell size (length less than 5 mm); shell height greater than length; indistinct lunule, auricle and submarginal sulcus; nonraised adductor scars; absence of lateral teeth; presence of a single demibranch; foot without heel (Payne & Allen, 1991;Oliver & Levin, 2006;Zelaya, 2010;Allen, 2015;Oliver, 2015). ...
... The genus Parathyasira currently includes 10 species (WoRMS Editorial Board, 2020). Huber (2015) transferred three species of Parathyasira (Parathyasira granulosa (Monterosato, 1874), P. kaireiae, and P. subcircularis) to the genus Thyasira. Parathyasira granulosa and P. subcircularis are retained in Thyasira by Huber (2015), in disagreement with Oliver (2015). ...
... Huber (2015) transferred three species of Parathyasira (Parathyasira granulosa (Monterosato, 1874), P. kaireiae, and P. subcircularis) to the genus Thyasira. Parathyasira granulosa and P. subcircularis are retained in Thyasira by Huber (2015), in disagreement with Oliver (2015). Following the viewpoint of Oliver (2015) I think that these species should be retained within the genus Parathyasira. ...
Article
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The Thyasiridae is the most species-rich family of bivalves in the abyssal and hadal zones of the northwestern Pacific Ocean. In recent years, with at least 14 thyasirid species found in that region at depths exceeding 3000 m. Some of them are the numerically dominant species in bottom communities. However, all members in that family have not yet been identified to the species level. Based on the material collected from 1953 to 2016 by five deep-sea expeditions, three new species of Thyasiridae (Mollusca: Bivalvia) are described from the abyssal and hadal zones of the northwestern Pacific. “Axinulus” roseus sp. nov. was found in the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench at 9000-9583 m depth. This species has a large rhomboidal shell with strong commarginal sculpture, a well defined, long and deep lunule and escutcheon without an auricle, a ctenidium consisting of a single demibranch, extensively lobed lateral pouches, and a large prodissoconch with specific sculpture. It is one of the dominant species in terms of abundance in macrobenthic communities in the deepest basin of the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench with a population density of up to 396 ind. m-2. The species has a shell length of up to 9.0 mm and it is the largest thyasirid with a single demibranch. “Axinulus” oliveri sp. nov. was found in a vast region of the northwestern Pacific on the abyssal plain adjacent to the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench, on the abyssal slope of the Kuril Islands, and in the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench at 4648-6168 m depth. This species is characterized by its ovate-rhomboidal shell, a well defined, deep and long escutcheon with a distinct auricle, a ctenidium with a single demibranch, and extensively lobed lateral pouches. It is widespread in the northwestern Pacific and forms populations with a density of up to 36 ind. m-2. Scanning electron microscopic observation of the gills of “A.” roseus sp. nov. and “A.” oliveri sp. nov. revealed that these species are not chemosymbiotic. “Axinulus” roseus sp. nov. and “A.” oliveri sp. nov. are provisionally assigned to the genus Axinulus, because they differ from the type species of the genus in a number of morphological and anatomical features. Parathyasira fragilis sp. nov. was found on the abyssal plain adjacent to the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench at 5249-5399 m depth. This species is distinguished by its very thin, fragile, dorsoventrally elongated, rhomboidal shell with very long anterodorsal margin and a long, wide, flat lunule. The taxonomic position of the new species is discussed.
... Bivalves bury themselves in sand or mud, attach to mangrove leaves, crawl on seagrass blades, attach to shells and rocks, and even bury in driftwood and coral rocks (Keast 2000;Turgeon et al 2009;van der Meij et al 2009). Overall, there are 8,500 valid species of all marine and brackish water specimens currently recognized (Huber 2015). The South China Sea, encompassing an area from the Karimata and Malacca Straits to the Strait of Taiwan, has the highest bivalves biodiversity in the world with about 802 species (Liu 2013). ...
... The dredging was performed as some species prefer to move into deeper substrate as they grow, with short siphons living just underneath the substrate surfaces Sassa et al 2011). Only living bivalves were identified according to Carpenter & Niem (1998), Dharma et al (2005), Huber (2015), and Lamprell & Healy (1998). ...
... However, in station 4, the considerably high amount of mud was prevalent in its substrate. High levels of nutrients, phytoplankton and bacteria reflected in high level of TOM as well as sand sediment were favorable to bivalves in coastal ecosystems (Huber 2015). The richness and density of the bivalves. ...
Article
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Bivalves play an important role in regulating bodies of water as well as in providing a wide range of ecosystem services including habitat complexity provision. A study of bivalve community structures in intertidal areas of Lamongan regency was conducted in June 2017 during the beginning of the dry season. It aimed to assess the species richness and ecological indices, as well as to analyze physicochemical parameters that might influence the community structures. Three 50-m long transect lines in each station were laid perpendicular to the coastline with five 1 x 1 m quadrant transects in each line. Results showed that there were 4 families, 8 genera and 8 species of bivalves of which Gafrarium pectinatum had the highest density, representing 82% of all bivalve individuals. On average, the Shannon's diversity index (H') and the Pielou's evenness index (J') were 0.4 and 0.35 respectively, while the Simpson dominance index (D) was 0.75. Ostreidae was evenly distributed and probably played an important role to govern the higher diversity and evenness indices, while G. pectinatum was responsible for the low value of diversity and evenness indices as well as the high value of the dominance index.
... Furthermore, based on particle size analysis, the substrate of intertidal area of Gili Ketapang Island was dominated by sand (< 98%) with a low percentage of gravel and mud in some stations (0.11-2.1%). Sand sediments, high levels of TOM and phosphate were found to be favorable to bivalves in the intertidal areas (Huber 2015). The physicochemical parameters of water and sediment characteristics are presented as mean and standard deviation (Table 2). ...
... Furthermore, the Veneridae family was the best represented in species richness, representing 2 genera and 4 species. The Veneridae or Venus clams are the largest recent marine families with about 765 species (Huber 2015;Lamprell & Healy 1998). The substrate of intertidal zone of Gili Ketapang was dominated by sand (< 98%), and Veneridae is an infauna group of bivalves that lives predominantly in sandy bottoms (Wilson 2013). ...
... G. tumidum has a size range from 10 to 40 mm commonly found in sandy intertidal areas with width distribution from Indo-West Pacific to Japan and New Caledonia. The clam is edible and exploited as food sources by local communities in some developing countries (Huber 2015;Islami 2013;Jagadis & Rajagopal 2007). The averages of species composition and abundance of bivalves in each station and the density percentage of bivalves are presented in Table 3 and Figure 2 respectively. ...
Data
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Bivalves provide a range of ecosystem services such as turbidity reduction, denitrification induction, and habitat complexity provision. This study aimed to assess the diversity and the community structure of bivalves in the intertidal areas of Gili Ketapang Island, East Java, Indonesia, as well as analyze the environmental parameters that might influence their biological community. Three (15-m long) transects with five 1x1-m quadrant plots in each transect line of each research station were established seawards perpendicular to the coast line. The bivalves were composed of 5 families, 8 genera and 10 species of which Gafrarium tumidum had the highest density and distribution. On average, the Shannon's diversity index (H') and the Simpson dominance index (D) were moderate with the values of 1.12 and 3.13 respectively. The Evenness Index (J') was high with value of 0.90, which indicated that the bivalve communities possessed ecological stability. Moreover, physico-chemical parameters of water and sediment were still in the range of the tolerant level to sustain bivalves life.
... Furthermore, based on particle size analysis, the substrate of intertidal area of Gili Ketapang Island was dominated by sand (< 98%) with a low percentage of gravel and mud in some stations (0.11-2.1%). Sand sediments, high levels of TOM and phosphate were found to be favorable to bivalves in the intertidal areas (Huber 2015). The physicochemical parameters of water and sediment characteristics are presented as mean and standard deviation (Table 2). ...
... Furthermore, the Veneridae family was the best represented in species richness, representing 2 genera and 4 species. The Veneridae or Venus clams are the largest recent marine families with about 765 species (Huber 2015;Lamprell & Healy 1998). The substrate of intertidal zone of Gili Ketapang was dominated by sand (< 98%), and Veneridae is an infauna group of bivalves that lives predominantly in sandy bottoms (Wilson 2013). ...
... G. tumidum has a size range from 10 to 40 mm commonly found in sandy intertidal areas with width distribution from Indo-West Pacific to Japan and New Caledonia. The clam is edible and exploited as food sources by local communities in some developing countries (Huber 2015;Islami 2013;Jagadis & Rajagopal 2007). The averages of species composition and abundance of bivalves in each station and the density percentage of bivalves are presented in Table 3 and Figure 2 respectively. ...
... Introduction. Bivalves can be found under phylum Mollusca, class Bivalvia, with about 10,000 living species throughout the world from freshwater lakes to the deepest abyss (Huber 2015;Rahman et al 2015;Turgeon et al 2009). They are soft-bodied invertebrates enclosed by two calcified valves joined by a two-hinged ligament (Yahya et al 2016). ...
... The samples were identified based on shell morphology by observing the shape as well as the size, thickness and design of the shells (Yahya et al 2016). The samples were also compared with bivalves illustrated in the references (Dharma et al 2005;Huber 2015, Lamprell & Healy 1998. ...
... Furthermore, the grain size analysis showed that the intertidal zone of Ngemboh was dominated by sand with the values from 66.7% at station 3, to 91.2% at station 5. Silt was the least common type of substrate, averaging only 8.9%. The variation of substrate types increases the available niche for suspension-feeder bivalves, and therefore, the more niche is expected to hold more bivalve species (Huber 2015;Oigman-Pszczol et al 2004). The environmental parameters of the research stations, as well as the substrate types are presented as mean and standard deviation in Table 2. DO -dissolved oxygen; BOD -biological oxygen demand; TOM -total organic matter. ...
Article
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Bivalves are filter feeders that play important roles in providing food for local communities, as well as promoting ecosystem stability. A study of bivalve diversity, distribution and abundance, was conducted in the intertidal area of Ngemboh, Gresik, East Java, Indonesia, in March 2018, during rainy season. The aim was to investigate the ecological indices, like species richness and species abundance, as well as the environmental parameters that might influence these bivalve communities. Three replicates of 15 m transect lines with five 1x1 m quadrant plots in each line were set up seawards, perpendicular to the coastline. All bivalves in the quadrants were counted. There were 278 individual bivalves from 11 species, 8 genera, and 5 families in the research areas. On average, the species abundance was 3.08 ind/m 2. The values for Shannon's diversity index (H'), Pielou's evenness index (J'), and Simpson's dominance index (C) were 1.16, 0.82 and 0.34, respectively. The Pearson correlation showed that the dissolved oxygen (DO) had a very high correlation with both species richness and diversity index (r=0.93 and r=0.92 respectively, P<0.01). Furthermore, Gafrarium pectinatum dominated 30% of the total abundance from all stations, suggesting this species to strongly shape the ecologicall indices in most research stations.
... Identification of specimens from the field surveys, as well as from those above, was facilitated by several important recent books, mainly "Marine Mollusks in Japan" (Okutani, 2000), "Mollusks in Korea" , "Seashells of China" (Qi, 2004), "An Illustrated Bivalvia Mollusca Fauna of China Seas" , "Mollusks of the Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea" (Zhang et al., 2016), "Compendium of Bivalves" (Huber, , 2015, and "Catalogue of the Living Bivalvia of the Continental Coast of the Sea of Japan (East Sea)" . ...
... Habitat: Upper subtidal zone. in Jeju Island Je J.-G. et al., 2002) Island (Wang, 1964;Higo et al., 1999;Min D.-K. et al., 2004;Huber, , 2015Schultz and Huber, 2013); ...
... Comments: According to Tëmkin (2010) (Huber, 2015). Proviionally following Tëmkin [l.c.], the record of P. nigra from Jeju Island should belong to this species. ...
Article
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The bivalve molluscan fauna of Jeju Island (Jeju-do), the largest island of Korea, is reviewed based on original and literature data. An annotated and illustrated catalogue of species with indication of local distribution and taxonomic comments is prepared, supplemented also with data on general distribution, habitats, and primary synonyms. This first part of the paper includes 105 species belonging to 21 families (Nuculidae through Limidae). The history of Jeju molluscan research, a bibliography on all aspects of mollusk biology, and the general ecology of Jeju bivalves in various habitats are also included. Five species are reported as new for Jeju Island, two species as new for Korea, and 11 species have been reported in literature but were not included in the first bivalve catalogue of Jeju by Noseworthy et al. (2007); in total 16 species are added to the fauna.
... The Galeommatidae sensu Ponder, 1998 is the most species-rich bivalve family, comprising about 620 described species and numerous undescribed species (Huber 2015). This family contains small to minute bivalves and exhibits high species diversity especially in tropical warm shallow waters (Bouchet et al. 2002;Paulay 2003;Lützen & Nielsen 2005). ...
... The genus Montacutona Yamamoto & Habe, 1959 comprises about ten species, although the species border is often difficult to determine (Huber 2015). The biology of many members of this genus remains unknown, but several species (e.g., M. mutsuwakensis Yamamoto &Habe 1959 andM. ...
... The members of the genus Montacutona have a calcified lithodesma between diverging lateral tooth (Morton 1980;Huber 2015). Montacutona sigalionidcola also has such a lithodesma. ...
Article
A new galeommatid bivalve, Montacutona sigalionidcola sp. nov., is described from an intertidal flat in the southern end of the Kii Peninsula, Honshu Island, Japan. Unlike other members of the genus, this species is a commensal with the burrowing scale worm Pelogenia zeylanica (Willey) (Annelida: Sigalionidae) that lives in fine sand sediments. Specimens were always found attached to the dorsal surface of the anterior end of the host body. This species has a ligament lithodesma between diverging hinge teeth, which is characteristic of Montacutona Yamamoto & Habe. However, it is morphologically distinguished from the other members of this genus in having elongate-oval shells with small gape at the posteroventral margin and lacking an outer demibranch. Molecular phylogenetic analysis based on the four-gene combined dataset (18S + 28S + H3 + COI) indicated that this species is monophyletic with Montacutona, Nipponomontacuta Yamamoto & Habe and Koreamya Lützen, Hong & Yamashita, which are commensals with sea anemones or Lingula brachiopods. This result suggests that host shifting across different phyla occurred at least twice in this clade.
... Globally, about 20 generic names have been used for the family, but only four of these are currently extant (Huber 2010;Coan and Valentich-Scott 2012). More than 100 species are found in warm waters around the world (Dall 1892;Lynge 1909;Lamy 1914;Coan 1973Coan , 1983Subba Rao and Dey 1986;Paredes and Cardoso 2001;Huber 2010Huber , 2015. The genus Donax currently includes 14 living subgenera. ...
... Schröter (1786) Syntype Tellina solida. From Guinea, erroneous, corrected by Huber (2015) to that mentioned by Gould (1862) for Donax tinctus: Mergui Archipelago (Myanmar, Andaman Sea) (ZMUC Biv-1109, 1 v); Donax tinctus. At Fiji Islands according to the printed label (MCZ 216808, 2 v). ...
... The morphology and geographic distribution of this species is similar to those of Donax (Latona) faba. Huber (2015) suggested that the morphology of the types of Tellina solida match Donax tinctus characters, and therefore, Spengler's name must be recognised as the valid one. Syntype Donax introradiatus. ...
Article
The species belonging to the family Donacidae living in Thailand waters are herein revised. After an exhaustive bibliographical search, 29 nominal species were found from this area. Materials from several institutions and specimens collected during fieldwork in Phuket and the Gulf of Thailand were studied. All the type materials were illustrated and redescribed. Details of the type localities, repositories, habitats and biogeographical distribution are discussed. In addition, some collected specimens and the type materials of the valid species and synonyms are illustrated. Currently, eight valid species are confirmed as living in Thai waters: Donax (Deltachion) spinosus Gmelin, 1791, Donax (Deltachion) semigranosus (Dunker, 1877), Donax (Dentilatona) incarnatus Gmelin, 1791, Donax (Hecuba) scortum (Linnaeus, 1758), Donax (Latona) cuneatus Linnaeus, 1758, Donax (Latona) faba Gmelin, 1791, Donax (Latona) solidus Spengler, 1798 and Donax (Paraserrula) introradiatus Reeve, 1855. The presence of Donax (Deltachion) semisulcatus Hanley, 1843, Donax brazieri Smith, 1892, Donax (Tentidonax) veruinus Hedley, 1913 and Donax victoris Fischer-Piette, 1942 in Thailand’s waters remains uncertain. These species have been reported in the study area in the literature, but they were not sampled during this study.
... Shell: As is common in fresh and brackish water bivalves (Cummings and Graf 2015), C. floridana presents a persistent periostracum covering the entire shell surface. In contrast to African Cyrenoida species, Cyrenidae, and Glauconomidae that are covered in thick, brown to greenish periostracum (Huber 2015), C. floridana bears a thin periostracum. Periostracum in fresh and brackish water bivalves is a common feature, because such environments present much more corrosive properties (Cummings and Graf 2015) and this organic layer protects against shell corrosion. ...
... Shape among Cyrenoidea varies from rounded (Cyrenoididae), trigonal (Cyrenidae), to anteroposteriorly elongated with a straightening of the posterior shell margin (Glauconomidae) (Joannis 1835;Owen 1959;Boss 1982;Huber 2015). Some representatives present a gap between the valves at the posterior end of the shell, as in Polymesoda (Morton 1976) and Glauconome (Owen 1959). ...
... Despite the size difference, ecological and morphological characteristics allow African and American species assignment to the same genus, i.e., the habitat in brackish waters and the unique hinge pattern. Compared with other Cyrenoidea, C. floridana can be considered the smallest representative of the superfamily; Cyrenidae attain lengths of 39 to more than 150 mm and Glauconomidae between 20 and 79.5 mm (Huber 2015). Cyrenidae is the only family within this group that presents concentric ribs; the remaining species are adorned only with growth lines (Boss 1982;Huber 2015). ...
Article
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Members of the small bivalve family Cyrenoididae inhabit brackish waters of the eastern and western Atlantic Ocean. Cyrenoida floridana (Dall, 1896) from the western Atlantic is poorly known aside from shell descriptions. A detailed shell and anatomical study of C. floridana is here presented and compared with available data for Cyrenidae and Glauconomidae, two families of closest relationship according to recent phylogenetic studies. The species is characterized by valves externally covered by thin light brown periostracum; muscle scars and pallial line (without sinus) weakly impressed on the internal shell surface; a unique hinge pattern composed of cardinal and lateral teeth joining each other, right hinge with two laterals and two cardinals forming two inverted-V-shaped teeth and left hinge with two cardinals and one lateral forming a horizontal reversed F-shaped tooth; and microtubules inside the shell walls. Anatomically, the species presents unequal adductor muscles; demibranchs fused to each other along their posterior ends; a pair of totally fused, pigmented siphons; two pairs of siphonal retractor muscles; and a stomach with conjoined style sac and intestine, a single typhlosole, and three sorting areas. Evidence of shell parasitism is described.
... At the same time, in America, authors like Dall (1891Dall ( , 1894aDall ( , 1894bDall ( , 1894cDall ( , 1894dDall ( , 1895aDall ( , 1895bDall ( , 1901Dall ( , 1915, Gould (1841Gould ( , 1851Gould ( , 1852Gould ( -1861, Say (1822) and Philippi (1844Philippi ( -1850Philippi ( , 1845Philippi ( , 1849Philippi ( , 1887aPhilippi ( , 1893 described several species for the coast of North America and the southern tip of South America. In the literature, more than 200 names were found living or associated to American forms (Abbott, 1974;Abbott and Dance, 1986;Cantera and Contreras, 1988;Carcelles, 1944Carcelles, , 1950Carcelles and Williamson, 1951;Castellanos, 1970;Coan and Valentich-Scott, 2012;Coan et al., 2000;Lamy, 1912aLamy, , 1912bLamy, , 1913Lamy, , 1914aLamy, , 1914bLamy, , 1917Lamy, -1918Lamy, , 1925Mikkelsen and Bieler, 2007;Moore, 2002;Rios, 1970Rios, , 1975Rios, , 1985Rios, , 1994Rios, , 2009Huber, , 2015Saul, 1973Saul, , 1991Scarabino, 2003;Scarabino et al., 2016;Signorelli and Pastorino, 2011, 2012a, 2012bSignorelli and Carter, 2016;Tryon, 1870;Zelaya, 2016). In this catalogue, all valid species belonging to the superfamily Mactroidea living in American waters are revised and listed. ...
... Taxonomy: Bernard, 1983Burch, 1945: 50;Carpenter in Lea et al., 1860: 2;Coan and Valentich-Scott in Carlton, 2007: 848;Coan and Valentich-Scott, 1997: 17;Coan et al., 2000: 458-459;Dall, 1916a: 40;Huber, 2010: 445;Strong, 1925. American species included in Mactra by Signorelli and Pastorino (2011, 2012a, 2012b show morphological characters that fit more adequately to Spisula as suggested by Huber ( , 2015. However, six of these species need more analysis to arrive to a conclusion. ...
... Remarks: Historically, the genus Mactrotoma was used instead of Standella due to the misinterpretation of the type species. The taxonomic status of both genera was recently revised (Petit, 2012;Huber, 2015) where two points of view were stated. On the one hand, Petit (2012) suggested that both genera are based on the same type species and therefore must be considered synonyms. ...
Chapter
The living species distributed in the American continent belonging to the family Mesodesmatidae Gray, 1840 are redescribed in this chapter. Two valid genera are recognized. The genus Mesodesma Deshayes, 1832 In Bruguière et al., 1789–1832 includes three living species. They are M. (Mesodesma) donacium (Lamarck, 1818), M. (Ceronia) arctatum (Conrad, 1831) and M. (Ceronia) deauratum (Turton, 1822). Finally, the genus Amarilladesma Huber, 2010, recently described, includes the Southwestern Atlantic A. mactroides (Reeve, 1854c).
... At the same time, in America, authors like Dall (1891Dall ( , 1894aDall ( , 1894bDall ( , 1894cDall ( , 1894dDall ( , 1895aDall ( , 1895bDall ( , 1901Dall ( , 1915, Gould (1841Gould ( , 1851Gould ( , 1852Gould ( -1861, Say (1822) and Philippi (1844Philippi ( -1850Philippi ( , 1845Philippi ( , 1849Philippi ( , 1887aPhilippi ( , 1893 described several species for the coast of North America and the southern tip of South America. In the literature, more than 200 names were found living or associated to American forms (Abbott, 1974;Abbott and Dance, 1986;Cantera and Contreras, 1988;Carcelles, 1944Carcelles, , 1950Carcelles and Williamson, 1951;Castellanos, 1970;Coan and Valentich-Scott, 2012;Coan et al., 2000;Lamy, 1912aLamy, , 1912bLamy, , 1913Lamy, , 1914aLamy, , 1914bLamy, , 1917Lamy, -1918Lamy, , 1925Mikkelsen and Bieler, 2007;Moore, 2002;Rios, 1970Rios, , 1975Rios, , 1985Rios, , 1994Rios, , 2009Huber, , 2015Saul, 1973Saul, , 1991Scarabino, 2003;Scarabino et al., 2016;Signorelli and Pastorino, 2011, 2012a, 2012bSignorelli and Carter, 2016;Tryon, 1870;Zelaya, 2016). In this catalogue, all valid species belonging to the superfamily Mactroidea living in American waters are revised and listed. ...
... Taxonomy: Bernard, 1983Burch, 1945: 50;Carpenter in Lea et al., 1860: 2;Coan and Valentich-Scott in Carlton, 2007: 848;Coan and Valentich-Scott, 1997: 17;Coan et al., 2000: 458-459;Dall, 1916a: 40;Huber, 2010: 445;Strong, 1925. American species included in Mactra by Signorelli and Pastorino (2011, 2012a, 2012b show morphological characters that fit more adequately to Spisula as suggested by Huber ( , 2015. However, six of these species need more analysis to arrive to a conclusion. ...
... Remarks: Historically, the genus Mactrotoma was used instead of Standella due to the misinterpretation of the type species. The taxonomic status of both genera was recently revised (Petit, 2012;Huber, 2015) where two points of view were stated. On the one hand, Petit (2012) suggested that both genera are based on the same type species and therefore must be considered synonyms. ...
Chapter
In this chapter the species included in the genera Simomactra, Spisula, Standella, Trinitasia and Tumbeziconcha are redescribed. The genus Simomactra Dall, 1894d includes three Pacific species: S. dolabriformis (Conrad, 1867), S. falcata (Gould, 1850) and S. planulata (Conrad, 1837). Spisula is another genus with several living species mainly distributed in temperate to cold waters in the north and south regions of the continent. This genus groups the species S. fuegiensis (E. A. Smith, 1905), S. guidoi (Signorelli and Scarabino, 2010), S. isabelleana (d’Orbigny, 1841), S. marplatensis (Doello Jurado in Carcelles, 1949), S. petitii (d’Orbigny, 1841), S. williamsi (Berry, 1960), S. (Hemimactra) solidissima (Dillwyn, 1817) and S. (Hemimactra) raveneli (Conrad, 1832). The genus Standella Gray, 1853 with eight species is another group well represented in American marine waters. It includes the species S. (Standella) fragilis (Gmelin, 1791), S. (Standella) nasuta (Gould, 1851), S. (Micromactra) angusta (Reeve, 1854a), S. (Micromactra) californica (Conrad, 1837), S. (Micromactra) janeiroensis (E. A. Smith, 1915), S. (Micromactra) surinamensis (Altena, 1968), S. (Mactroderma) isthmica (Pilsbry and Lowe, 1932) and S. (Mactroderma) velata (Philippi, 1849). The genus Trinitasia Maury, 1928 with T. iheringi (Dall, 1897) and the genus Tumbeziconcha Pilsbry and Olsson, 1935 with T. goniocyma (Pilsbry and Lowe, 1932) and T. thracioides (Adams and Reeve, 1850) complete the chapter.
... At the same time, in America, authors like Dall (1891Dall ( , 1894aDall ( , 1894bDall ( , 1894cDall ( , 1894dDall ( , 1895aDall ( , 1895bDall ( , 1901Dall ( , 1915, Gould (1841Gould ( , 1851Gould ( , 1852Gould ( -1861, Say (1822) and Philippi (1844Philippi ( -1850Philippi ( , 1845Philippi ( , 1849Philippi ( , 1887aPhilippi ( , 1893 described several species for the coast of North America and the southern tip of South America. In the literature, more than 200 names were found living or associated to American forms (Abbott, 1974;Abbott and Dance, 1986;Cantera and Contreras, 1988;Carcelles, 1944Carcelles, , 1950Carcelles and Williamson, 1951;Castellanos, 1970;Coan and Valentich-Scott, 2012;Coan et al., 2000;Lamy, 1912aLamy, , 1912bLamy, , 1913Lamy, , 1914aLamy, , 1914bLamy, , 1917Lamy, -1918Lamy, , 1925Mikkelsen and Bieler, 2007;Moore, 2002;Rios, 1970Rios, , 1975Rios, , 1985Rios, , 1994Rios, , 2009Huber, , 2015Saul, 1973Saul, , 1991Scarabino, 2003;Scarabino et al., 2016;Signorelli and Pastorino, 2011, 2012a, 2012bSignorelli and Carter, 2016;Tryon, 1870;Zelaya, 2016). In this catalogue, all valid species belonging to the superfamily Mactroidea living in American waters are revised and listed. ...
... Taxonomy: Bernard, 1983Burch, 1945: 50;Carpenter in Lea et al., 1860: 2;Coan and Valentich-Scott in Carlton, 2007: 848;Coan and Valentich-Scott, 1997: 17;Coan et al., 2000: 458-459;Dall, 1916a: 40;Huber, 2010: 445;Strong, 1925. American species included in Mactra by Signorelli and Pastorino (2011, 2012a, 2012b show morphological characters that fit more adequately to Spisula as suggested by Huber ( , 2015. However, six of these species need more analysis to arrive to a conclusion. ...
... Remarks: Historically, the genus Mactrotoma was used instead of Standella due to the misinterpretation of the type species. The taxonomic status of both genera was recently revised (Petit, 2012;Huber, 2015) where two points of view were stated. On the one hand, Petit (2012) suggested that both genera are based on the same type species and therefore must be considered synonyms. ...
Chapter
The superfamily Mactroidea includes 46 described genera and almost 260 species. The supra-generic classification of this superfamily was recently revised and rearranged (Signorelli and Carter, 2016). They recognized eight subfamilies grouped into four families (Table 1.1). Within the family Mactridae four subfamilies are currently included. They are Mactrinae Lamarck, 1809; Lutrariinae Gray, 1853; Darininae Signorelli in Carter et al., 2011 and Tanysiphoninae Scarlato and Starobogatov in Nevesskaja et al., 1971. The latter was described by Scarlato and Starobogatov in Nevesskaja et al. (1971, p. 18) to distinguish the species Tanysiphon rivalis Benson, 1858. Although Tanysiphonidae was described as a family level, several authors considered it a subfamily of Mactridae (Boss in Parker, 1982, Bieler et al., 2010; Carter et al., 2011; Signorelli and Carter, 2016). Beu (2006) proposed Zenatinae as a synonym of Lutrariinae. In addition, the subfamily name Kymatoxinae Stenzel and Krause, 1957 [= Pteropsellinae Keen, 1969] was recently relocated to the family Anatinellidae Deshayes, 1853 (Signorelli and Carter, 2016). This family was described to distinguish the genus Anatinella, previously introduced by G. B. Sowerby, I (1821–1834), from Lutraria Lamarck, 1799.
... A detailed history of taxonomic proposals for mytilid subfamilies was summarized by Morton (2015). The classification adopted herein is in accordance with Huber (2010Huber ( , 2015, also adopted by the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS, http://www. marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=211), including ten subfamilies and 52 genera. ...
... Divergence times were estimated by Bayesian Inference (BI) in RevBayes under the fossilized birthdeath model (Heath et al., 2014;Höhna et al., 2016). A relaxed molecular clock was applied assuming an uncorrelated exponential model on molecular branch (Huber, 2010(Huber, , 2015. References for ecological information and habits are listed in the supplementary material (Supporting information, Table S2). ...
... The Mytilidae encompasses two main clades. Subfamily names are in accordance with the classification proposed byHuber (2015), and asterisks (*) indicate subfamilies not recovered as monophyletic in this analysis. ...
Article
Convergent morphology is a strong indication of an adaptive trait. Marine mussels (Mytilidae) have long been studied for their ecology and economic importance. However, variation in lifestyle and phenotype also make them suitable models for studies focused on ecomorphological correlation and adaptation. The present study investigates mantle margin diversity and ecological transitions in the Mytilidae to identify macroevolutionary patterns and test for convergent evolution. A fossil-calibrated phylogenetic hypothesis of Mytilidae is inferred based on five genes for 33 species (19 genera). Morphological variation in the mantle margin is examined in 43 preserved species (25 genera) and four focal species are examined for detailed anatomy. Trait evolution is investigated by ancestral state estimation and correlation tests. Our phylogeny recovers two main clades derived from an epifaunal ancestor. Subsequently, different lineages convergently shifted to other lifestyles: semi-infaunal or boring into hard substrate. Such transitions are correlated with the development of long siphons in the posterior mantle region. Two independent origins are reconstructed for the posterior lobules on the inner fold, which are associated with intense mucociliary transport, suggesting an important cleansing role in epifaunal mussels. Our results reveal new examples of convergent morphological evolution associated with lifestyle transitions in marine mussels.
... At the same time, in America, authors like Dall (1891Dall ( , 1894aDall ( , 1894bDall ( , 1894cDall ( , 1894dDall ( , 1895aDall ( , 1895bDall ( , 1901Dall ( , 1915, Gould (1841Gould ( , 1851Gould ( , 1852Gould ( -1861, Say (1822) and Philippi (1844Philippi ( -1850Philippi ( , 1845Philippi ( , 1849Philippi ( , 1887aPhilippi ( , 1893 described several species for the coast of North America and the southern tip of South America. In the literature, more than 200 names were found living or associated to American forms (Abbott, 1974;Abbott and Dance, 1986;Cantera and Contreras, 1988;Carcelles, 1944Carcelles, , 1950Carcelles and Williamson, 1951;Castellanos, 1970;Coan and Valentich-Scott, 2012;Coan et al., 2000;Lamy, 1912aLamy, , 1912bLamy, , 1913Lamy, , 1914aLamy, , 1914bLamy, , 1917Lamy, -1918Lamy, , 1925Mikkelsen and Bieler, 2007;Moore, 2002;Rios, 1970Rios, , 1975Rios, , 1985Rios, , 1994Rios, , 2009Huber, , 2015Saul, 1973Saul, , 1991Scarabino, 2003;Scarabino et al., 2016;Signorelli and Pastorino, 2011, 2012a, 2012bSignorelli and Carter, 2016;Tryon, 1870;Zelaya, 2016). In this catalogue, all valid species belonging to the superfamily Mactroidea living in American waters are revised and listed. ...
... Taxonomy: Bernard, 1983Burch, 1945: 50;Carpenter in Lea et al., 1860: 2;Coan and Valentich-Scott in Carlton, 2007: 848;Coan and Valentich-Scott, 1997: 17;Coan et al., 2000: 458-459;Dall, 1916a: 40;Huber, 2010: 445;Strong, 1925. American species included in Mactra by Signorelli and Pastorino (2011, 2012a, 2012b show morphological characters that fit more adequately to Spisula as suggested by Huber ( , 2015. However, six of these species need more analysis to arrive to a conclusion. ...
... Remarks: Historically, the genus Mactrotoma was used instead of Standella due to the misinterpretation of the type species. The taxonomic status of both genera was recently revised (Petit, 2012;Huber, 2015) where two points of view were stated. On the one hand, Petit (2012) suggested that both genera are based on the same type species and therefore must be considered synonyms. ...
Chapter
Mactrinae is the largest subfamily of this group of bivalves. In the American continent 43 species grouped into ten genera are recognized. In this chapter, the species included in the genera Harvella, Mactrellona, Mactromeris, Mulinia and Rangia are redescribed. The genus Harvella includes the only one living species H. elegans (G.B. Sowerby I, 1825). The genus Mactrellona Marks, 1951 groups four species M. alata (Spengler, 1802), M. clisia (Dall, 1915), M. exoleta (Gray, 1837) and M. subalata (Mörch, 1861). The genus Mactromeris Conrad, 1868 includes the Pacific species M. catilliformis (Conrad, 1867), M. hemphillii (Dall, 1894a) and M. polynyma (Stimpson, 1860). The genus Mulinia is one of the most represented ones with nine living species in the American continent. They are M. bicolor Gray, 1837, M. byronensis Gray, 1837, M. cleryana (d’Orbigny, 1846), M. edulis (King, 1832), M. exalbida Gray, 1837, M. lateralis (Say, 1822), M. levicardo (E. A. Smith, 1881), M. modesta (Carpenter, 1864) and M. pallida (Broderip and G.B. Sowerby I, 1829). The genus Rangia Des Moulins, 1832 with four living species is the last group revised in this chapter. Rangia (Rangia) cuneata (Sowerby I, 1832, in 1821−1834), Rangia (Rangianella) flexuosa (Conrad, 1840), Rangia (Rangianella) mendica (Gould, 1851) and Rangia (Rangianella) pontchartrainensis (Morrison, 1965) (new combination) belong to this genus.
... The functional outgroup chosen for rooting was We chose to apply a conservative taxonomic composition of Eurytellina, Merisca, Scissula, and Angulus. Huber and Schniebs (2009) and Huber et al. (2015) recently carried out a series of new taxonomic allocations, creating some new genera and revalidating senior synonyms, which altered the traditional scenario of tellinid taxonomy. Despite their argumentation, the concept of some species and genera should be viewed with caution. ...
... madagascariensis, based on the general shell outline and ornamentation (Boss, 1969). Huber and Schniebs (2009) and Huber et al. (2015) considered it to only include T. albinella, while T. alfredensis and T. madagascariensis were assigned to Pallidea and Peronaea, respectively. However, Huber et al. (2015) argued that "Pallidea" alfredensis is close to Eurytellina, sharing the "weaker left dentition" within the suprageneric Eurytellina-group. ...
... Huber and Schniebs (2009) and Huber et al. (2015) considered it to only include T. albinella, while T. alfredensis and T. madagascariensis were assigned to Pallidea and Peronaea, respectively. However, Huber et al. (2015) argued that "Pallidea" alfredensis is close to Eurytellina, sharing the "weaker left dentition" within the suprageneric Eurytellina-group. By contrast, Tellinota and Peronaea are in the "Peronaea" group, characterized by similarities such as the more developed calcareous layer of the ligament. ...
Article
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One of the main questions of phylogenetic systematics has recently focused on the reliability and robustness of taxonomic data. Many recent studies are devoted almost exclusively to the molecular-morphological couplet. However, in many metazoan taxa, the presence of skeletal parts or poorly preserved soft parts is dominant in collections, making it difficult to extract genetic material. This is the case with many invertebrates and unfortunately a very common situation in mollusk collections. Herein we carry out a phylogenetic analysis of the transisthmian American tellinid bivalve genus Eurytellina based on anatomical and morphometric characters, using different ways to analyze the morphometric data under parsimony-based methods. Species in this genus are recognized as deep infaunal burrowers and present a strong filter-feeding apparatus. We included 144 taxonomically important morphoanatomical and morphometric characters and 19 landmark characters. The main results are a) Tellinota (formerly a synonym of Eurytellina) is confirmed as a taxon restricted to Africa; b) Eurytellina lineata is confirmed as sister group to all the other members of the genus; c) there is strong evidence for three robust clades, here named as groups trinitatis, nitens and punicea; d) some transisthmian sister species hypotheses are confirmed—although the pattern of speciation and radiation may be related to a complex long-term elevation of the Panama Isthmus and previous events (probably since the early Cenozoic). Furthermore, several new anatomical characters are described within the Order Tellinoidea, which should be considered in future studies.
... Kuphus polythalamius is the largest and among the most atypical members of the Teredinidae (Huber, 2015). Teredinid bivalves are commonly referred to as shipworms due to their worm-like appearance and habit of burrowing in and ingesting wood, including the timbers of wooden ships (Turner, 1966). ...
... Kuphus polythalamius also grows far larger than other shipworms, with some specimens exceeding 1.6 m in length and 7 cm in diameter (Wright, 1866). This unusual size places K. polythalamius among the largest of bivalve species (Huber, 2015). The burrow lining is far more stout and massive than that of other shipworm species, consistent with the need to protect and support the animal in the absence of rigid wood substrates. ...
Article
Full-text available
Kuphus polythalamius (Teredinidae) is one of the world’s largest, most rarely observed, and least understood bivalves. Kuphus polythalamius is also among the few shallow-water marine species and the only teredinid species determined to harbor sulfur-oxidizing chemoautotrophic (thioautotrophic) symbionts. Until the recent discovery of living specimens in the Philippines, this species was known only from calcareous hard parts, fossils, and the preserved soft tissues of a single large specimen. As a result, the anatomy, biology, life history, and geographic range of K. polythalamius remain obscure. Here we report the collection and description of the smallest living specimens of K. polythalamius yet discovered and confirm the species identity of these individuals by using sequences of three genetic markers. Unlike previously collected specimens, all of which have been reported to occur in marine sediments, these specimens were observed burrowing in wood, the same substrate utilized by all other members of the family. These observations suggest that K. polythalamius initially settles on wood and subsequently transitions into sediment, where this species may grow to enormous sizes. This discovery led us to search for and find previously unidentified and misidentified wood-boring specimens of this species within museum collections, and it allowed us to show that the recent geographic range (since 1933) of this species extends across a 3000-mile span from the Philippines to Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands.
... Clams of the nonmarine genus Corbicula Megerle von Mühlfeld, 1811(Cyrenidae Gray, 1840 are characterized by shells with serrated lateral teeth and the lack of a pallial sinus (Huber, 2015). Having a native range in South and East Asia, Africa and parts of Australasia, these bivalves are effective invaders of freshwater and brackish-water ecosystems in Europe and the Americas (Starobogatov, 1970;Korniushin, 2004;Bieler & Mikkelsen, 2019). ...
... He & Zhuang (2013) recognized 19 species of Corbicula in China. According to the estimate by Huber (2015), worldwide there might be 60-70 Corbicula 'species', delineated chiefly on the basis of shell morphology. Graf & Cummings (2020) have listed as many as 91 valid species for this genus. ...
Article
Here, we investigate the shell shape variation of some closely related freshwater species of the bivalve genus Corbicula using descriptive (qualitative), geometric morphometric and traditional conchometric approaches. The combination of these different approaches allows for an effective discrimination between the species C. fluminalis, C. fluminea and C. leana, as well as an unidentified Corbicula sp. The roundness of the shell hinge is an important diagnostic feature, as are shell sculpture (ribs), symmetry of the apertural margin, and both position and extension of the umbo. We also identify possible hybrids between C. fluminalis and C. leana, with these showing features intermediate to those of the parent species. We examine variability of shell features of C. leana in selected areas in Europe and compare these results with material from the native range of Japan and Korea. For C. leana, we identify two geographic morphotypes from the native area; within Europe, there is a high morphological diversity of this species with several new forms arising, most probably as a result of hybridization.
... siliqua). Systematics follows Bieler et al. (2010Bieler et al. ( , 2014, Carter et al. (2011) andHuber (2015) for Tellinidae, and Pérez (2019) for Carditidae. For the specific detemination, we used the works of Brocchi (1814), Bucquoy et al. (1887Bucquoy et al. ( -1898, Chirli (2014Chirli ( , 2015Chirli ( , 2016, Dollfus and Cotter (1909), Huber (2010Huber ( , 2015, Lauriat-Rage (1981, 1982, 1986, Lozano-Francisco (1997), Nobre (1938Nobre ( -1940, Poppe and Goto (1993) and Sacco (1897aSacco ( , 1897bSacco ( , 1898aSacco ( , 1898bSacco ( , 1899Sacco ( , 1900Sacco ( , 1901. ...
... Systematics follows Bieler et al. (2010Bieler et al. ( , 2014, Carter et al. (2011) andHuber (2015) for Tellinidae, and Pérez (2019) for Carditidae. For the specific detemination, we used the works of Brocchi (1814), Bucquoy et al. (1887Bucquoy et al. ( -1898, Chirli (2014Chirli ( , 2015Chirli ( , 2016, Dollfus and Cotter (1909), Huber (2010Huber ( , 2015, Lauriat-Rage (1981, 1982, 1986, Lozano-Francisco (1997), Nobre (1938Nobre ( -1940, Poppe and Goto (1993) and Sacco (1897aSacco ( , 1897bSacco ( , 1898aSacco ( , 1898bSacco ( , 1899Sacco ( , 1900Sacco ( , 1901. ...
Article
Full-text available
The exceptional Pliocene marine faunal assemblages of west-central Portugal have been known since the late 19th century. They include highly diverse molluscan faunas whose study is far to be completed. Discovered nearly 40 years ago, Vale do Freixo (Carnide, Pombal) is perhaps the most outstanding fossil site. Nevertheless, the bivalves remain relatively unknown. This study focuses on the taxonomy of this relevant group of marine Mollusca. The research, based on a detailed sampling of three fossiliferous beds from the Carnide Formation, yielded a list of 85 species belonging to 75 genera and 32 families. Forty-three species are new for the Carnide area and twenty-three are reported for the first time in the Portuguese Pliocene, increasing to 115 the number of known species in the Mondego Basin in the Beira Litoral.
... Turner (1966) synonymized many teredinid species with similar or identical pallet morphology. This reduced the number of species by over half and expanded the geographic range of many recognized species, an action which Huber (2015) considered too extreme in some cases. The merging of some congeners requires reconsideration given that investigations into Teredinidae life histories, biogeography, and phylogenetic relationships have revealed cryptic species among taxa submerged into synonymy. ...
... Turner (1966) stated that P. pentagonalis was "probably" a synonym of Nototeredo edax based on Habe's description and drawings, and lists it as such in Turner (1971). The synonymy of P. pentagonalis with N. edax was accepted by Inaba and Oyama (1977), Kuroda and Habe (1981), but questioned by Tsunoda (1979) and Huber (2015). Okutani et al. (2009) rejected this synonymy, noting clear differences in pallet morphology, suggesting that their Psiloteredo specimens were P. megotara, and that an examination of the type material of P. pentagonalis would be required for confirmation. ...
Article
Cryptic species are a common phenomenon in cosmopolitan marine species. The use of molecular tools has often uncovered cryptic species occupying a fraction of the geographic range of the original morphospecies. Ship-worms (Teredinidae) are marine bivalves, living in drift and fixed wood, many of which have a conserved morphology across cosmopolitan distributions. Herein novel and GenBank mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I) and nuclear (18S rRNA) DNA sequences are employed to produce a phylogeny of the Teredinidae and delimit a cryptic species pair in the Psiloteredo megotara complex. The anatomy, biogeography, and ecology of P. megotara, Psiloteredo sp. and Nototeredo edax are compared based on private and historic museum collections and a thorough literature review. Morphological and anatomical characters of P. megotara from the North Atlantic and Psiloteredo sp. from Japan were morphologically indistinguishable, and differ in pallet architecture and soft tissue anatomy from N. edax. The two Psiloteredo species were then delimited as genetically distinct species using four molecular-based methods. Consequently, the Northwest Pacific species, Psiloteredo pentago-nalis, first synonymized with N. edax and then with P. megotara, is resurrected. Nototeredo edax, P. megotara and P. pentagonalis are redescribed based upon morphological and molecular characters. Phylogenetic analysis further revealed cryptic species complexes within the cosmopolitan species Bankia carinata and possibly additional cryptic lineages within the cosmopolitan Lyrodus pedicellatus.
... Systematic classification and morphological descriptions of the species are presented with collection details. Melvill and Standen, 1906;Comber, 1906;Gravely, 1941;Subrahmanyam et al., 1949;Purkait and Manna, 1988;Subba Rao et al., 1991;Subba Rao et al., 1992;Dey and Ramakrishna, 2007;Dey, 2008;Mahapatra, 2008 (Huber, 2015) it was renamed again as M. dolabrata. ...
Article
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Occurrence of bivalve Mactrinula dolabrata (Reeve, 1854) from the coastal waters off Andhra Pradesh, is the third addition to the species list of the genus from India. The present finding, new to Indian waters, is indicative of an extended range distribution of the species from the Malay Peninsula towards the east coast of India.
... This species was found at the lower substratum of ascidian colony Polyclinum saturnium (Savigny, 1816). A stereo microscope was used to observe this small sized mussel for identification and identified following several standard books (Satyamurti, 1956;Oliver, 1992;Bosch et al., 1995;Fernando and Fernando, 2002;Huber, 2010;Huber, 2015;Subba Rao, 2017). Later the specimen (M.2097) was deposited at the Marine Biology Regional Centre, Chennai (Zoological Survey of India). ...
Article
The Asian date mussel Arcuatula senhousia (Benson in Cantor, 1842) collected from Mandapam (Palk Bay), southeast coast of India is reported for the first time. The mussel were observed in the intertidal regions to depths of 2 m. The occurrence of the non-indigenous species, A. senhousia belonging to Mytilidae family is reported with its associate flora and fauna. Its appearance was associated with 11 flora and 13 fauna. In the present paper, notes about the history of invasion of this small green mussel, introduction and dispersal are discussed. Among associate fauna, decapod Portunus pelagicus (Linnaeus, 1758) was found to be the predator of this mussel.
... As such, other characters from the soft anatomy should be considered for taxonomic classification in addition to the pallets, including anatomy of the digestive system, pigmentation and structure of the siphons and features of the cephalic hood and mantle collar (Turner 1966;Leonel et al. 2006). Based on these characters, approximately 69 species across 15 genera have been described (Turner 1966(Turner , 1971MacIntosh 2012;Huber 2015;Shipway et al. 2016;Borges and Merckelbach 2018). ...
Article
Full-text available
Nivanteredo gen. nov. coronata sp., a new genus and species from the wood-boring bivalve family Teredinidae, is described. Multiple specimens were collected off the coasts of Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea, between October 2004 and August 2014, from both sunken driftwood and deployed wooden panels at depths of 240–773 m. A combination of features identify these specimens as both a new genus and species, including: unique calcareous pallets distinct from those of all other previous described genera, featuring a central stalk that runs almost the entire length of the blade and a disk shaped periostracal awning adorning the proximal pallet; an elongated mantle collar, extending from the base of the siphons to the mid-stalk of the pallets; a distinctive and elongated auricle on the dorsal shell valve; a complex caecum (wood-storing organ) featuring a highly coiled typhlosole, which ranks as one of the largest relative to total body length among the family. Larval settlement on wooden panels placed at 441 m represents the deepest distribution range of any known teredinid, which were previously thought to be restricted to waters above 200 m. The discovery of Nivanteredo coronata, recruiting at depths more than twice those previously recorded for tereinids, raises the possibility of a hidden diversity in other deep-sea locations and suggests that previous sampling, which has largely been limited to shallow coastal waters, has skewed our understanding on the biogeography and distribution of this family. To aid future identification and systematics of this complex family, we produced a revised and updated appendix of both internal and external characters across the Teredinidae, including the new genus Nivanteredo. http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:24216C86-CCB0-4B27-8FE2-89338969E32E
... Despite their widespread occurrence, thioautotrophic symbionts have eluded cultivation, thus their metabolic properties can only be inferred from their genomes and/or from data obtained using cultivation-independent techniques. In this study, we report the isolation and phenotypic characterization of the sulfur-oxidizing endosymbiont of the giant shipworm Kuphus polythalamius, the world's longest bivalve [3]. ...
Article
Full-text available
A chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing, diazotrophic, facultatively heterotrophic, endosymbiotic bacterium, designated as strain 2141T, was isolated from the gills of the giant shipworm Kuphus polythalamius (Teredinidae: Bivalvia). Based on its 16S rRNA sequence, the endosymbiont falls within a clade that includes the as-yet-uncultivated thioautotrophic symbionts of a marine ciliate and hydrothermal vent gastropods, uncultivated marine sediment bacteria, and a free-living sulfur-oxidizing bacterium ODIII6, all of which belong to the Gammaproteobacteria. The endosymbiont is Gram-negative, rod-shaped and has a single polar flagellum when grown in culture. This bacterium can be grown chemolithoautotrophically on a chemically defined medium supplemented with either hydrogen sulfide, thiosulfate, tetrathionate or elemental sulfur. The closed-circular genome has a DNA G+C content of 60.1 mol% and is 4.79 Mbp in size with a large nitrogenase cluster spanning nearly 40 kbp. The diazotrophic capability was confirmed by growing the strain on chemolithoautotrophic thiosulfate-based medium without a combined source of fixed nitrogen. The bacterium is also capable of heterotrophic growth on organic acids such as acetate and propionate. The pH, temperature and salinity optima for chemolithoautotrophic growth on thiosulfate were found to be 8.5, 34 °C and 0.2 M NaCl, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of pure culture of a thioautotrophic animal symbiont. The type strain of Thiosocius teredinicola is PMS-2141T.STBD.0c.01aT (=DSM 108030T).
... Specimens were washed using sea water to remove the debris, and then transferred to clean plastic bags. Thereafter, they were brought to the laboratory, photographed and identified up to species level using standard taxonomic keys of Rao 5 , Oliver 8 , Huber 9 , Huber et al. 10 Material examined: 126 numbers (living specimens) collected and studied near the mouth of River Udyawara, Padukere (Karnataka, India). ...
... Specimens were washed using sea water to remove the debris, and then transferred to clean plastic bags. Thereafter, they were brought to the laboratory, photographed and identified up to species level using standard taxonomic keys of Rao 5 , Oliver 8 , Huber 9 , Huber et al. 10 Material examined: 126 numbers (living specimens) collected and studied near the mouth of River Udyawara, Padukere (Karnataka, India). ...
... Similarly, Taylor & Glover (2010) noted that the geographical ranges of extant species of the family Solemyidae are limited to tropical to temperate latitudes. Live Acharax specimens have not been reported from farther south than off South America at 53 S and have not been observed north of 60 N in the northern Pacific (Huber 2015). The geographical distribution of fossil Acharax species shows that the northernmost species previously reported is the Eocene Acharax tigilensis (Krishtofovich in Devjatilova & Volobueva 1981) from the Siberian Anadyr River at $65 N, while the southernmost report is of the Oligocene Acharax belenensis Olsson, 1931 in Peru, at $5 S. ...
Article
We report, for the first time, the solemyid Acharax svalbardensis sp. nov., from deep-sea methane seep sites on the western Svalbard margin, 79°N. This species is rather small and so far the northernmost representative of its genus. It is identified based on the following combination of diagnostic characters: umbo 27–30% valve length from posterior margin; H/L ratio ∼0.35; broadly rounded to truncated anterior margin; 15 moderately developed, flat double ribs with middle ribs about as strong as posterior ribs. The shells from Acharax svalbardensis sp. nov. were found in sediment cores from two pockmarks at Vestnesa Ridge at ∼1200 m water depth in the Fram Strait off NW Spitsbergen, Svalbard archipelago. Previously, the vesicomyid bivalves Archivesica arctica and Isorropodon nyeggaensis have been documented from the same pockmarks. Here, we describe the new solemyid species and report its stratigraphical occurrence and co-occurrence with the previously described methane seep-associated vesicomyids. All findings of the vesicomyids and the new solemyid species are restricted to the time interval ∼19,000–15,600 cal. years BP, correlating with Heinrich Stadial HS1. This period was characterized by cold surface conditions and extensive ice rafting from sea ice and icebergs in the North Atlantic and Arctic region. Inflow of a warm subsurface current of Atlantic water below the melt water layer led to higher bottom water temperatures at the Svalbard margin than at present. This increase in bottom water temperature probably allowed several methane seep-associated bivalve species to settle for a short period of time, namely the vesicomyids A. arctica and I. nyeggaensis and the new species of the solemyid bivalve genus Acharax described here. http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:0AAE625F-2BDB-4ACE-8328-25274D30CDF
... Starting from M. Huber (2010Huber ( , 2012Huber ( , 2015 and Signorelli & Printrakoon (2019) and based on insights gained from the review of hundreds of lots of Donacidae from the region and more than a 1500 from the Indo-West Pacific, all records have been checked and only verifiable records have been used. Species lists without descriptions and illustrations are excluded as identifications cannot be checked, e.g., the record of Donax brazieri Smith, 1892 from ne Thailand (in Sanpanich, 2011), marked as first record from that country. ...
Article
Based on lots in collections, literature data and type material, the living Donacidae of the South China Sea and East Asia are reviewed. At least 35 nominal species have been recorded for this area, including numerous synonyms and misidentifications. Thirteen valid species (one including two subspecies) are recorded from the area. For all species the variation in their shells and their distribution are described. It is evident that despite recent reviews the identification of Donacidae remains challenging and several taxonomic issues are addressed in this paper. Two new species are described: Donax (Deltachion) spiniferus spec. nov. and Tentidonax borneensis spec. nov. The true identity of Donax semisulcatus Hanley, 1843 is revealed and Donax (Latona) bicolor Gmelin, 1791 is recognised as valid species. Substantial new information is provided for Donax (Deltachion) bruneirufi M. Huber, 2012 and Donax (Latona) listeri Hanley, 1882 (previously only recorded from a single locality each). Because of their consistent considerably smaller size, sculpture and different habitat Tentidonax Iredale, 1930 is raised to genus level.
... Afterwards, micro-sculpture and cardinal teeth were observed. Several standard books (Satyamurti, 1956;Huber, 2010Huber, , 2015Subba Rao, 2017) were also used to confirm the identification of these cardiids. Specimen (ZSI/MBRC/M-2212) was then deposited at the Zoological Survey of India department of Marine Biology Regional Center (ZSI/MBRC), in Chennai, India. ...
Article
The main impetus for this project is to improve the taxonomic understanding of the Cardiid, Acrosterigma attenuatum (G. B. Sowerby II, 1841.) as well as document it's invasion along south east of India. There were no impact at habitats as they are filter feeding organisms and it was not involved any part of biofouling. A. attenuatum is successfully established itself subtidally at depths of approximately 3-5 meters. The introduction of this Cardiid was most likely due to deliberate human activity during the discharge of ballast materials.
... Afterwards, micro-sculpture and cardinal teeth were observed. Several standard books (Satyamurti, 1956;Huber, 2010Huber, , 2015Subba Rao, 2017) were also used to confirm the identification of these cardiids. Specimen (ZSI/MBRC/M-2212) was then deposited at the Zoological Survey of India department of Marine Biology Regional Center (ZSI/MBRC), in Chennai, India. ...
... However, the genus Adipicola is considered paraphyletic (Lorion et al. 2013;Thubaut et al. 2013aThubaut et al. , 2013b. Thus, the taxonomy of this group of bivalves is not definitive and contrasting classification approaches have been presented in different works (Dell 1987(Dell , 1995Huber 2010Huber , 2015. According to recent literature, the number of species included within Adipicola is not definitive. ...
Article
New material collected at a methane seep site off central Chile (36°21.997′S, 73°42.785′W), known as the Concepción Methane Seep Area (CMSA), revealed the presence of the genus Adipicola in the SE Pacific. Dead individuals consisting of empty single and articulated valves were collected from vesicomyid clam beds, at 690 m depth by the remotely operated vehicle KIEL 6000, using scoop nets. Shell characters, such as equivalve, antero-posteriorly elongate shell, external surface smooth without periostracal hair, not gaped and hinge plate without teeth or crenulations, were observed and compared with the morphology of described species within the genus. Based on these morphological characters we tentatively assign the individuals belonging to Adipicola leticiae previously never found below 27°S in the SE Pacific. This new finding constitutes the first record of an extant Bathymodiolinae mussel off central Chile. The current knowledge of additional chemosymbiotic bivalves at the CMSA is discussed. The present study updates and contributes to the knowledge of deep-water bivalve biodiversity in Chilean waters.
... Within the Phylum Mollusca, Bivalvia is the second-largest taxonomic class with about 10,000 existing species documented worldwide (Rahman et al. 2015). The diversity of bivalves includes 101 families and 1,380 genera with 9,620 species (Huber, 2015). Globally, annual total marine bivalve production is more than 15 million tons, with Asia alone producing more than 85% (FAO, 2017;Wijsman et al. 2019). ...
Article
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This study aims to describe the relationship between length and weight of the bivalves Donax cuneatus (Linnaeus, 1758) and Meretrix casta (Gmelin, 1791) along the Gulf of Mannar. A total of 1,791 individuals of two species were collected from October 2019 to December 2020. The length-weight relationship of both species has been estimated using the equation W = aLb. A common length-weight relationships, W = 0.0002 L2.8882 for D. cuneatus, and W = 0.1971 L2.3556 for M. casta were recorded. The results showed negative allometric growth in both the bivalve species. The coefficient of determination (r2) was 0.9426 for Donax cuneatus and 0.9628 for Meretrix casta. Condition factor was estimated to be less than one throughout the study period for D. cuneatus and for M. casta it ranged from 0.81 to 1.38. This study provides a mathematical equation of the relationship between length and weight, and the condition of both the species along the Gulf of Mannar, southeast coast of India. Keywords: Allometric growth, Bivalve, Gulf of Mannar, Length-weight relationship, Sustainable management
... Recent shells from Sagami Bay depicted by Slodkewitsch (1967, pl. 4, Figures 2e4; as "Acila divaricata submirabilis") also belong to A. mirabilis. A. mirabilis is somewhat variable in convexity, thickness, and rostration and has several synonyms: Nucula sculpta Pease, 1860; Acila divaricata submirabilis Schenck, 1936;Acila schencki Habe, 1958; and Acila archibenthalis Okutani, 1964(Huber 2015. Omitted in literature, the recent Acila (Acila) divaricata bonini Slodkewitsch, 1967 (type locality: Celebes (Sulawesi), Indonesia) is probably a synonym of A. divaricata. ...
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Marine bivalve mollusks were obtained from 13 collecting sites, intertidally on beaches and from fishing nets in ports, along the coast of Gangwon Province, Korea. A total of 70 species belonging to 27 families were encountered; all species are illustrated with photographs. Among them, 17 species are recorded for the first time for Gangwon-do, and two species are new records for Korea: Gari chinensis Deshayes, 1855 (Psammobiidae) and Clinocardium likharevi (Kafanov in Scarlato, 1981) (Cardiidae). Taxonomic and distributional comments on 13 species are provided, and the biogeography of the area is discussed. Some warm-water species of bivalves (e.g., Anadara talmiensis (Kalishevich, 1976), Trapezium liratum (Reeve, 1843), and Meretrix lusoria (Röding, 1798)), found in Gangwon-do for the first time, are remnants of the Holocene warming in the Russian sector of the East Sea (Sea of Japan) thus indicating the significance of Korean waters as a transitional zone for past molluscan migrations.
... Species determinations were primarily based on comparisons with identified material in the ZRC, and by checking against the original descriptions, revisionary treatments and popular references (e.g., Reid, 2007;Huber, 2010Huber, , 2015 and other references cited herein). Herein, species names prefixed with 'aff.' indicate affinity to the stated species, but is decidedly not conspecific, while 'cf.' indicates comparison, and possible conspecificity, with the named taxon. ...
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Pulau Satumu is the southernmost islet within Singapore’s territorial jurisdiction. It is often referred to as Raffles Lighthouse or Raffles Light after its lighthouse, which began operating in 1855. Some notes of interest on the islet’s etymology and history, such as the earliest known name being “the Coney” or “Coney Island”, are provided. We present a first inventory of the mollusc species of Pulau Satumu, which is of some significance as the islet is one of the marine areas recently proposed to be of conservation priority in the Singapore Blue Plan 2018. A total of 328 species, compiled from records in the literature, and original data from a recent biodiversity survey in 2020 and existing material deposited in the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum, are listed. The class Gastropoda is most speciose with 232 species in 69 families, followed by the class Bivalvia with 92 species in 26 families, then the classes Polyplacophora and Cephalopoda, each with two families and two species. Records of five species, Nerita signata, Drupa albolabris, Drupa morum, Drupa ricinus and Morula uva, are regarded as likely to be erroneous. More than 250 species are figured; the vast majority of them are of available voucher material.
... The live specimens of gastropods, bivalves and polyplacophorans were cleaned, washed and photographed, and preserved in 70% ethanol. The collected specimens were identified with the help of keys, research papers and books (Abbott and Dance 1982;Bosch et al. 1995;Huber 2010Huber , 2015Subba Rao 2003, 2017Eichhorst 2016a, b;Okutani 2000;Robin 2008;Yonow 2008Yonow , 2012. All the species names are updated from the WoRMS website, WoRMS (2021). ...
Article
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The survey of molluscan fauna of Ashtamudi estuary of the southwest coast of India recorded the presence of 119 species classified under 3 classes (Polyplacophora, Gastropoda and Bivalvia), 57 families and 96 genera. The species diversity was dominated by the Gastropoda (69 species), followed by the Bivalvia (49 species) and the Polyplacophora (1 species). The report includes four species recorded for the first time from India: Desmaulus edgarianus (Melvill, 1898), Pilosabia trigona (Gmelin, 1791), Nassarius javanus (Schepman, 1891) and Jorunna labialis (Eliot, 1908). The true diversity of the mangrove region was as good as that of a community with 31.380 (= 31) equally common species; the respective values for the bar mouth and lake regions were 15.516 and 8.997, respectively, indicating that the molluscan species assemblage of the mangrove was the most diverse and of the lake, the least. True β-diversity across this gradient registered 1.792, which means that though there were three communities, they were equivalent to only 1.792 (= 2) effective communities, i.e., the three actual communities were as different from each other as 2 with equal weights and no species in common.
... Alternatively, regarded Galatheavalvidae as Galeommatoidea. Huber (2010Huber ( , 2015 followed this superfamilial placement, but considered Galatheavalvinae to be a subfamily of Galeommatidae. ...
Article
This contribution provides the first integrative study of Cyamioidea, a group of bivalves largely neglected in the past. By combining information obtained from shell morphology, gross anatomy, histology, reproductive biology and DNA sequencing, the distinctive characters of Cyamioidea are determined, and the taxa belonging to this superfamily are revised. Gaimardioidea, previously considered as a distinct superfamily, is reduced to family level (Gaimardiidae), which, along with Cyamiidae, are assigned to Cyamioidea. All studied cyamioideans share a common reproductive character: the presence of a true follicular epithelium surrounding each developing oocyte, which persists after spawning, surrounding the developing embryos and participating in their anchorage to the gill filaments. Several morphological and anatomical characters support the distinction of Gaimardiidae and Cyamiidae. Based on that information, the placement of Gaimardia and Kidderia in Gaimardiidae, and that of Cyamiocardium, Cyamiomactra, Cyamium, Heteromactra, Pseudokelly, Ptychocardia and Reloncavia in Cyamiidae, is confirmed. Jukesena, historically placed in Veneroidea, is here allocated to Cyamiidae. Neoleptonidae, previously also attributed to Cyamioidea, are reallocated to Veneroidea.
... The abundance of bivalves from the family Veneridae in Bayambang, Batang and Cato can also be linked to the presence of vast seagrass beds of these areas. The family is considered the largest among bivalve groups comprising 765 representative species [15]. The most abundant bivalve belonging to this family are G. tumidium and G. pectinatum. ...
Article
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The bivalve resources in the coastal barangays of Infanta, Pangasinan were assessed using adescriptive survey method. A total of 30 species of bivalves belonging to 17 families were identified across study sites. Corbicula fluminea is the most abundant species of bivalves found in the coastal barangays with Family Veneridae dominating the community with a total of 8 representative species. Of the 6 coastalbarangays, Bayambang harbors the highest number of species (28) while Barangay Cato recorded thehighest relative abundance (28.88%). Relative abundance of species varied by study sites; G. tumidium (Bayambang – 13.8%), G. pectinatum (Cato - 13.56%), C. fluminea (Batang – 14.55%; Poblacion – 39.4%), P. exilis (Patima – 30.66%) and Delillia sp. (Nayom – 25.76%). Margalef’s index was found highest in Bayambang (4.32). Computed Shannon-Weiner index indicates moderate diversity across sites with Bayambang and Cato recorded the highest value (H’=2.83). Simpson’s dominance index indicates high dominance of a single or few species with values ranging from 0.72 (Poblacion) to 0.93 (Bayambang).Computation of evenness index revealed high values (0.85-0.93) indicating a more equitable distribution of individual bivalve. Lastly, Batang and Cato manifested the highest similarity and shared species indices of 0.92 and 0.48, respectively.
... The modern Veneridae are the most speciose family of the Bivalvia, with ∼750 species in 135 genera, outnumbering the next most diverse families, the Galeommatidae and Tellinidae, each with ∼500 species in 100 genera (Huber, 2015;Collins et al., 2018;Edie et al., 2018). Molecular analyses have established a backbone phylogeny for Veneridae (Mikkelsen et al., 2006;Chen et al., 2011), but species coverage within the group is still insufficient to confirm monophyly of some longestablished taxonomic groupings, such as subfamilies. ...
Article
The Veneridae are the most speciose modern family of bivalves, and one of the most morphologically conservative and homoplastic, making subfamily- and sometimes even genus-level classification difficult. The widespread Cretaceous genus Legumen Conrad, 1858 is currently placed in the subfamily Tapetinae of the Veneridae, although it more closely resembles the Solenoida (razor clams, Pharidae and Solenidae) in general shell form. Here we provide high-resolution images of the Legumen hinge for the first time. We confirm from hinge morphology that Legumen belongs in Veneridae, but it should be referred to incertae subfamiliae, rather than retained in the Tapetinae, particularly in light of the incomplete and unstable understanding of venerid systematics. Legumen represents a unique hinge dentition and a shell form—and associated life habit—that is absent in the modern Veneridae despite their taxonomic diversity. Veneridae are hyperdiverse in the modern fauna, but strikingly ‘under-disparate,’ having lost forms while gaining species in the long recovery from the end-Cretaceous extinction.
... Alternatively, regarded Galatheavalvidae as Galeommatoidea. Huber (2010Huber ( , 2015 followed this superfamilial placement, but considered Galatheavalvinae to be a subfamily of Galeommatidae. ...
Article
This contribution provides the first integrative study of Cyamioidea, a group of bivalves largely neglected in the past. By combining information obtained from shell morphology, gross anatomy, histology, reproductive biology and DNA sequencing, the distinctive characters of Cyamioidea are determined, and the taxa belonging to this superfamily are revised. Gaimardioidea, previously considered as a distinct superfamily, is reduced to family level (Gaimardiidae), which, along with Cyamiidae, are assigned to Cyamioidea. All studied cyamioideans share a common reproductive character: the presence of a true follicular epithelium surrounding each developing oocyte, which persists after spawning, surrounding the developing embryos and participating in their anchorage to the gill filaments. Several morphological and anatomical characters support the distinction of Gaimardiidae and Cyamiidae. Based on that information, the placement of Gaimardia and Kidderia in Gaimardiidae, and that
... The family Mytilidae includes more than 400 valid species distributed in all oceans around the globe (Lamy 1936(Lamy -1937Soot-Ryen 1955, 1969Rios 2009;Huber 2010Huber , 2015. Various suprageneric classifications are mentioned in the literature. ...
... Within the Phylum Mollusca, Bivalvia is the second-largest taxonomic class with about 10,000 existing species documented worldwide (Rahman et al. 2015). The diversity of bivalves includes 101 families and 1,380 genera with 9,620 species (Huber, 2015). Globally, annual total marine bivalve production is more than 15 million tons, with Asia alone producing more than 85% (FAO, 2017;Wijsman et al. 2019). ...
Article
Background: Bivalves are benthic animals existing in coastal habitats, particularly mudflats and tidal. Because of their availability, rich protein content and cheaper cost, they contribute a major portion of the small-scale fishery resource worldwide. Limited information has been available on the food-feeding and habitat structures of bivalves along Indian waters. Therefore, the present investigation was carried out to know the food-feeding and habitat preferred by wedge clam, Donax cuneatus off Thoothukudi, Gulf of Mannar, India. Methods: Soil, water and wedge clam samples were collected from the selected site from September 2019 to March 2021 and soil texture, water quality parameters and gut contents were analyzed at the laboratory. Result: During the study period, salinity, water temperature, pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) were in the range from 31-37°C, 24-28°C, 7.7-8.7 and 4.1-5.8 mg/l, respectively. Wedge clams were mainly observed at sandy beaches up to 10 cm in depth. Donax cuneatus mainly feeds on detritus (65%), followed by phytoplankton (31%) and zooplankton (4%). Hence, the diverse fluctuation of food particles, season-specific food and feeding biology and local environmental conditions at the studied region might be the responsible features for the availability of Donax cuneatus.
... With time, the number of published documents (taxonomic and ecological studies) has increased, but the list of bivalve fauna from East Malaysia remains very incomplete. Numerous species are recorded in Huber (2010Huber ( , 2015, but his records 'north Borneo' or just 'Borneo' are not specific enough to be included here. Similar taxonomic J TT and conservation work was published on fish species of Bangladesh in which the implementation of conservation measures on local fish habitats was proposed (Parvez et al. 2019). ...
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Species checklists enlist the species existing within a distinct geographical biome and assist as an indispensable input for evolving conservation and administration strategies. The arenas of conservation ecology and biology face the challenge of exaggerated biodiversity, accredited to the non-recognition of taxonomic inconsistencies. The study’s goals are to organize all scattered taxonomic information regarding bivalve molluscs from Malaysian Borneo, i.e. Sarawak and Sabah, under one umbrella. Available literature regarding Malaysian Borneo was reviewed. The published taxonomic data on bivalve species, conservation status, inconsistencies, habitats (marine, fresh, and brackish), research aspects, threats, and conservation strategies are presented. A critical review of the checklists and distributional records of the class Bivalvia from Malaysian Borneo and subsequent validation of species names with the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) database revealed that currently 76 bivalve species from 12 orders and other entities, 18 superfamilies, and 27 families have been recorded from the area. Twenty-six inconsistencies with WoRMS were found, and the corrected names are presented. The study indicates most of the enlisted bivalve species have not been evaluated by the IUCN Red List authority and have ‘Least Concern’ or ‘Data Deficient’ status for Malaysian Borneo. To date, published documents on conservation decision strategies and guidelines for future research are not good enough. Nevertheless, potential threats and their remedies for bivalves in the enriched Malaysian Borneo ecosystems are discussed herein.
... The family Cardiidae Lamarck, 1809 is one of the most species-rich and diverse families of Bivalvia; it includes the cockles and giant clams and at least 50 genera and about 290 species (Bruguière 1789, Reeve 1844-1845, Keen 1969Vokes 1980;Vidal 1997aVidal , 1999aCoan et al. 2000;Ter Poorten 2005, 2007Vidal and Kirkendale 2007;Huber 2010Huber , 2015Herrera et al. 2015). This family, documented since Late Triassic (Fischer-Piette 1977;Schneider 1995), is widely and mainly distributed on the continental shelf in tropical and temperate waters, but also including species in boreal waters and upper continental slope (Wilson and Stevenson 1977;Herrera et al. 2015). ...
Article
The taxonomy of the species assigned to the genus Dallocardia (Cardiidae: Trachycardiinae) recorded from the Argentinean and Magellanic biogeographical provinces was reviewed, revealing that two species are present: Dallocardia muricata (Linnaeus, 1758), well known as widely distributed along the western Atlantic, and here considered as having its living southernmost limit of distribution in the southern Brazilian coast; and Dallocardia delicatula (EA Smith, 1915), a species resurrected as valid, to which D. manueli (Prado, 1993) is regarded as a junior synonym, occurring along southeastern and southern Brazil, Uruguay and in temperate waters of Argentina. The shells of both species are characterized in detail, differing in outline and rib morphology. Apart from this, a study of the functional anatomy of D. muricata was performed. This species is a moderately rapid shallow burrower from intertidal and subtidal regions in coarse, grassy and muddy sand bottoms, presenting adaptations to live in low-energy environments of sheltered bays and inlets. It has short siphons, with the incurrent crowned with simple, finger-like tentacles, which prevent, but do not block completely excess material and/or large particles from entering the pallial cavity. In addition to presenting a wide pedal gape and the two siphonal openings, D. muricata is the first known cardiid having a temporary fourth mantle gape, this acting as a supplementary incurrent opening, and also serving for expulsion of pseudofaeces. Compared to the labial palps, the ctenidia in this species are large and involved in processing the bulk of material entering the mantle cavity. The densely folded labial palps are indicative that D. muricata deals with moderate to considerable amounts of material. D. muricata is a hermaphroditic bivalve species.
Chapter
The living species included in the family Anatinellidae Deshayes, 1853 distributed along the American continent are mentioned in this chapter. All American living species belong to the subfamily Kymatoxinae Stenzel and Krause, 1957. Two genera are recognized. The genus Anatina Schumacher, 1817 groups the species A. anatina (Spengler, 1802) and A. cyprinus (Wood, 1828). And the genus Raeta Gray, 1853 includes R. (Raeta) plicatella (Lamarck, 1818) and R. (Raeta) undulata (Gould, 1851).
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This paper provides reliable data on the occurrence of bivalve mollusk Neaeromya compressa in the Sea of Japan. Nine alive specimens (L = 5.9-19.2 mm) were collected in June 2003 in Peter the Great Bay (southern Primorye) at the depths of 66-74 m on mud and sand. These are illustrated and described in detail. T
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The second part of the annotated and illustrated catalogue of species of the bivalve molluscan fauna of Jeju Island (Jeju-do) is based on original and literature data. The catalogue provides local distribution and taxonomic comments on bivalves and is supplemented with data on general distribution, habitats, and primary synonyms. This part includes 142 species belonging to 36 families (Lucinidae through Poromyidae), with original photographs for 76 species. Nineteen species are reported as new for Jeju Island, 9 species as new for Korea: Vasticardium subrugosum (G.B. Sowerby II, 1839), Fragum loochooanum Kira, 1959, Montacutona japonica (Yokoyama, 1922), Pristipagia ojiensis (Tokunaga, 1906), Donax cuneatus L., 1758, Sunetta kirai Huber, 2010, Pitar inflatus (G.B. Sowerby II, 1851), Dosinia cf. orbiculata Dunker, 1877, Pelecyora corculum (Römer, 1870), and 6 species have been reported in literature but were not included in the first molluscan catalogue of Jeju by Noseworthy et al. (2007); in total, 25 species are added to the Jeju fauna in this part. Odd literature records are discussed. In all, 248 species and 58 families of marine bivalve mollusks are currently known in Jeju-do.
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Citation: Aldea C, Novoa L, Alcaino S, Rosenfeld S (2020) Diversity of benthic marine mollusks of the Strait of Magellan, Chile (Polyplacophora, Gastropoda, Bivalvia): a historical review of natural history. ZooKeys 963: 1-36. Abstract An increase in richness of benthic marine mollusks towards high latitudes has been described on the Pacific coast of Chile in recent decades. This considerable increase in diversity occurs specifically at the beginning of the Magellanic Biogeographic Province. Within this province lies the Strait of Magellan, considered the most important channel because it connects the South Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. These characteristics make it an interesting area for marine research; thus, the Strait of Magellan has historically been the area with the greatest research effort within the province. However, despite efforts there is no comprehensive and updated list of the diversity of mollusks within the Strait of Magellan up to now. This study consisted of a complete bibliographic review of all available literature that included samples of mollusks in the Strait of Magellan. More than 300 articles were reviewed, covering 200 years of scientific knowledge. There were 2579 records belonging to 412 taxa, of which 347 are valid species. Of the total valid species, 44 (~13%) are considered of doubtful presence in the Strait. This work increases the known richness of mollusks of the Strait of Magellan by 228%; it is also the first report that integrates all available diversity studies of the three most speciose classes of benthic mollusks (Gastropoda, Bivalvia and Polypla-cophora) from the Strait of Magellan. A peer-reviewed open-access journal Cristian Aldea et al. / ZooKeys 963: 1-36 (2020) 2
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Tellimya fujitaniana (Yokoyama, 1927) (Lasaeidae). Три живые особи с длиной раковины 3.9-6.2 мм собраны в 2003 и 2018 гг. в диа-пазоне глубин 17-28 м на илисто-песчаном грунте. Обобщены данные по экологии и ареалу данного вида. Information on finding in Peter the Great Bay (north-western part of the Sea of Japan) a new species of bivalve mollusk for the fauna of Russia, Tellimya fujitaniana (Yokoyama, 1927) (Lasaeidae), are presented. Three alive specimens with shell length 3.9-6.2 мм were collected in 2003 and 2018 at the depths of 17-28 m on muddy sand. Data on the ecology and geographical range of this species are summarized.
Article
Представлены сведения об обнаружении в зал. Петра Великого (северо-западная часть Японского моря) нового для фауны России вида двустворчатого моллюска Tellimya fujitaniana (Yokoyama, 1927) (Lasaeidae). Три живые особи с длиной раковины 3.9–6.2 мм собраны в 2003 и 2018 гг. в диапазоне глубин 17–28 м на илисто-песчаном грунте. Обобщены данные по экологии и ареалу данного вида. Ключевые слова: двустворчатый моллюск, Tellimya fujitaniana (Yokoyama, 1927), Lasaeidae, распространение, залив Петра Великого, Японское море. Information on finding in Peter the Great Bay (north-western part of the Sea of Japan) a new species of bivalve mollusk for the fauna of Russia, Tellimya fujitaniana (Yokoyama, 1927) (Lasaeidae), are presented. Three alive specimens with shell length 3.9–6.2 мм were collected in 2003 and 2018 at the depths of 17–28 m on muddy sand. Data on the ecology and geographical range of this species are summarized. Key words: bivalve mollusks, Tellimya fujitaniana (Yokoyama, 1927), Lasaeidae, distribution, Peter the Great Bay, Sea of Japan.
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