Article

Irritable bowel syndrome symptoms during pregnancy trimesters

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders presented by bowel habit change and abdominal pain without any structural defect. Prevalence of IBS in Iran was reported between 4.2-18.4%. Although the etiology is still unknown but many factors such as motility disorders, genetics, nutrition, behavioral disorders may cause it. During pregnancy, gastrointestinal symptoms like nausea and vomiting are very common. The anxiety level will also increase during this period. This study was designed to evaluate the IBS symptoms during pregnancy. METHODS: In a crosssectional study, IBS symptoms in pregnancy were compared with normal subjects. Patients were included to the study after filling the IBS questionnaire. RESULTS: 323 pregnant subjects and 98 controls were included. IBS was seen in 23.5% of pregnant subjects and in 13.3% of patients in control group (p < 0.05). Constipation dominant IBS had a significant increase in third trimester comparing with first and second trimester (p < 0.05). Diarrhea dominant IBS had a significant increase in second and third trimester comparing with control group (p = 0.04). Mixed symptom-subtype of IBS had a significant increase in third trimester comparing with control group (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Frequency of IBS symptoms was higher in pregnant subjects than in control group. This could be because of hormonal changes and psychological factors which change during pregnancy. KEYWORDS: Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Pregnancy, Prevalence

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