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An Acupuncture Based Mind Body Therapy: A New Model for Management of Hypothyroidism.

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ABSTRACT NUMBER: 161 TITLE An Acupuncture Based Mind Body Therapy: A New Model for Management of Hypothyroidism. AUTHORS BABLIS, Peter; POLLARD, Henry (Macquarie University) PRESENTING AUTHOR: Peter BABLIS (AUSTRALIA 澳大利亚) Director, Universal Health International Objective: To review the function of the thyroid gland and report on the anatomy, physiology, hormone synthesis and dysfunction of the thyroid gland. Treatment options are discussed and four case studies of an acupuncture based mind-body therapy (Neuro-Emotional Technique, NET) successfully managing hypothyroid dysfunction are presented. Method: A Medline search using key words: thyroid, synthesis, anatomy, physiology, acupuncture, hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism was performed. In addition, four cases of hypothyroidism are presented with pre and post treatment objective measures of thyroxine (T3, T4) and TSH levels. The treatment methods utilised acupuncture pulse points for diagnosis and treatment. These points were integrated into a stress reduction neuro-emotional technique. Results: Objective measures of a new acupuncture mind-body approach to hypothyroid dysfunction are presented and its relevance to the biopsychosocial model are discussed. This new treatment is compared to the existing biomedical approaches to treatment. Conclusion: Thyroid dysfunction has been effectively treated with medicine for many years. This paper presents a new therapy, which produced objective pre-post changes to hypothyroid dysfunction in four cases. This therapy may have potential in future circumstances, with further research recommended to confirm its reliability/ validity. Key Words: acupuncture, chiropractic, treatment, biopsychosocial model, psychology, thyroid, NET.
AN ACUPUNTURE BASED MIND BODY THERAPY
A NEW MODEL FOR MANAGEMENT OF HYPOTHYROIDISM
Peter Bablis MSc. (Candidate), BSc.,GradDipChiro.,GradDipSportsSc., D.Ac., Department of Health & Chiropractic Macquarie University
Dr Henry Pollard BSc., Grad Dip Chiro., MSportsSc, PhD Head of Research, Department of Health & Chiropractic Macquarie University
Case 1: 45 year old Caucasian female had
increase in weight from 61 kg to 67 kg in 4 - 6
weeks and complained of tiredness.On the 5th
August 2002 tests showed free thyroxine to be
11.6 pmol/l (range 10.0-21.0 pmol/l), free T3 2.2
pmol/l (range 2.2-5.3 pmol) and TSH 0.07 mIU/I
(range 0.30-4.00 mIU/I) (See TABLE 1). On 23
September 2002, a follow-up thyroid function
test was performed that showed improvement in
levels. Free thyroxine was 14.2 pmol/l, free T3 4.1
pmol/l, and TSH 0.09 mIU/I (this was still low).
A third thyroid function test was performed on 4
December 2002 after the patient has reported her
energy levels were back to normal and her weight
had dropped from 67kg back to 62 kg. This test
showed free thyroxine to be 14.8 pmol/l and TSH
0.33 mIU/I.
INTRODUCTION: Neuro -Emotional -Technique
NET is a 15-step, multi-modal intervention that incorporates principles of several health disciplines, including
cognitive behavioural psychology, traditional Chinese medicine pulse assessment, and a feedback technique
called muscle test. NET engages the energy system as it is conceived in the traditional Chinese medical model
(Chan et al, 2001) by having the patient touch the pulse point on the wrist that is determined to be involved in
the body’s stress reaction to the given stimuli. The therapist helps the patient identify the particular pulse point
using principles of traditional Chinese ve-element theory (Jagirdar, 1989), which basically maintains that the
major energy channels or “meridians” contain specic emotional qualities. See NET master chart with Pulse
Correction. An objective of NET is to achieve a reversal (or extinction) of classically conditioned distressing
emotional responses to trauma-related stimuli, thus patients become less physiologically reactive to distressing
stimuli.
OBJECTIVE: To review the functions of the thyroid gland and report on the anatomy, physiology, hormone
synthesis and dysfunction of the thyroid gland. Treatment options are discussed and four case studies of an
acupuncture based mind-body therapy (Neuro-Emotional Technique NET) successfully managing hypothyroid
dysfunction are presented.
RESULTS: Objective measures of a new acupuncture mind-body approach to hypothyroid dysfunction are
presented and its relevance to the biopsychosocial model is discussed. This new treatment is compared to the
existing biomedical approaches to treatment.
REFERENCES:
1. Chan C, Ho PS, Chow E. A body-mind-spirit model in health: an Eastern approach. Soc Work Health Care. 2001;34(3-4):261-82. 2. Jagirdar PC. The theory of ve elements in acupuncture. Am J Chin Med. 1989;17(3-4):135-8.
3. Shagam JY. Thyroid disease: an overview. Radiol Techno 2001;73(1):25-40. 4. Koch CA, Sarlis NJ. The spectrum of thyroid diseases in childhood and its evolution during transition to adulthood: natural history, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and
management. J Endocrinol Invest 2001;24(9):659-75. 5. Walker S. NET seminar folder Jan 30-Feb 3, 2002. Encinitas, CA: NET Inc, 1996. 6. Gin RH, Green BN. George Goodheart, Jr, DC, and history of Applied Kinesiology. J Manipulative
Physiol Ther 1997;20:331-. 7. Engel GL. The need for new medical model: a challenge for biomedicine. Science 1977;196(4286):129-36
CONCLUSION: Thyroid dysfunction has been effectively treated with medicine for many years. This paper presents a new therapy. NET has produced a successful clinical outcome
demonstrated by objective pre and post treatment measurements in four cases of hypothyroidism without a need for medication. A spontaneous remission of the condition may explain
the improvement, but given the chronicity of the complaint and the time frame of improvement after implementation of therapy, we hypothesise that the improvement resulted from
the NET therapy used in the treatment. Since these case reports are not a controlled trial for hypothyroid treatment any conclusion drawn must be carefully considered. We therefore
recommend that a randomized controlled trial of the effect of NET therapy in hypothyroid patients be conducted to ascertain if this phenomenon is real under controlled conditions, or
purely coincidental.
Case 3: 41 year old Caucasian
female constantly complained of
tiredness. The follow-up testing
was compared to baseline
values taken on November 6th.
The results of these tests are
found in table three and indicate
a good improvement in TSH
(13.99 pre / 5.81 post ,range
0.36-5.00 mlU/L) and T4 levels
( 8 pre / 12 post, range12-20
pmol/L).
Case 4: 28 year old
Caucasian female, before
treatment, showed
elevated TSH levels (14.8
mIU/L range 0.5-4.0),
while the tests taken on
May 21st 2002, showed
a normal range TSH level
(3.58 mIU/L range
0.3-4.0) (see table 4).
Case 2: On the 9th October
2001 a blood test showed
TSH levels at 8.1 mU/I (range
0.5-4.15 mU/I). The patient was
sent for a follow up thyroid
function on the 12th October
2001. This test showed TSH
levels to be 3.7 mU/I. Another
follow-up test performed on 8
May 2002 showed the TSH
levels to be 3.0 mU/I (see
TABLE 2).
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