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Zoopharmacognosy (Animal Self Medication): a review

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Abstract

Self-medication is a specific therapeutic behavioral change in response to disease or parasitism. The empirical literature on self-medication has so far focused entirely on identifying cases of self-medication in which particular behaviors are linked to therapeutic outcomes. The term “zoopharmacognosy” is relatively new to the pharmacy field. This term is introduced in 1987. And it means animal self medication. It is the self medication process by an animal for any disease or wound by any plant or insect. The used plant or insect having the quality of curing the illness. Scientific investigation opened the doors for new medicines which were pointed out by the behavior of the animal towards self medication. Since the introduction of this study many new drugs are now in use which was found in the study of self medication behavior of an animal. So many new species are found which self medicate themselves for disease or other illness. This study will help us to increase our knowledge about the existence of the unknown drugs which are use by various animals.
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