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psych: Procedures for Psychological, Psychometric, and Personality Research. R Package Version 1.0–95

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... The analyses were done in R (R Core Team, 2021) using the RStudio environment (RStudio Team, 2020). The following packages were used: Hmisc (Harrell, 2019), car (Fox et al., 2020), psych (Revelle, 2018), tidyverse (Wickham et al., 2019), lmtest (Zeileis & Hothorn et al., 2002), Lavaan (Rosseel, 2012), stargazer (Hlavac, 2018) and QuantPsych (Fletcher, 2012). The code is available as open-source. ...
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Discrepancies in views of the Self are suggested to be negatively related to well-being (Higgins, 1987). In the present study, we used a novel concept, Personality Estimation Discrepancy (PED), to test this classic idea. PED is defined as the computed difference between how one view oneself (Self-Perceived Personality) and a standard Big Five test (IPIP-NEO-30). In a pre-registered (osf.io) UK online study (N = 297; Mage = 37, SD = 14) we analyzed: (1) whether PED would predict Subjective Well-Being (SWB; Harmony in Life, Satisfaction with Life, Positive affect, Negative Affect) and Self-Insight, and (2) whether Self-Insight would mediate the relationship between PED and SWB. The results showed that underestimation of Extraversion, Conscientiousness, and Emotional Stability indeed is associated with both high SWB and high Self-Insight. However, these effects mostly disappeared when controlling for the Big Five test scores. Furthermore, Self-Insight largely (42.9%) mediated the relationship between the mis-estimation and SWB. We interpret these finding such that the relationship of mis-estimating one’s personality with SWB and Self-Insight are mostly explained by the Big Five factors, yet the discrepancy is a dependent feature of scoring particularly high or low on certain personality traits.
... Analyses were performed using car (Fox and Weisberg, 2019), chisq.posthoc.test (Ebbert, 2019), corrplot (Wei and Simko, 2021), DescTools (Andri, 2021), ggpubr (Kassambara, 2020), psych (Revelle, 2021), RVAideMemoire (Hervé, 2021), and stats libraries in R Statistical Software (R Core Team, 2019). ...
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... All analyses were run with the statistical open source program R version 3.6.0 (R Core , RStudio (RStudio and several R packages (Revelle, 2018;Tingley et al., 2014;Torchiano, 2016;Wickham, 2011;Wickham et al., 2018). Figures were generated using the R package ggplot2 (Wickham, 2016). ...
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