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An Introduction to the History of the Turkic Peoples

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An Introduction to the History of the Turkic Peoples

Abstract

This work deals with the ethnogenesis of the Turkic peoples and state formation in medieval and early modern times
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... Konunun ayr~nt~s~~ hakk~nda Palaz Erdemir 2003'e bak~lmal~d~r. Bat~~ Kök Türk ka~an~n~n ota~~n~~~, Bizans kaynaklannda "Alt~n Da~" olarak tercüme edilen Eray (Golden 1992(Golden (2002: 105) diye bir da~~ oldu~u bildirilmi~tir. Golden, bu kelimeyi *Ak Tag "Akda~" olarak dü~ünmektedir (Golden 1992 ( (Clauson 1971(Clauson (1973(Clauson -1975: 146). ...
... Konunun ayr~nt~s~~ hakk~nda Palaz Erdemir 2003'e bak~lmal~d~r. Bat~~ Kök Türk ka~an~n~n ota~~n~~~, Bizans kaynaklannda "Alt~n Da~" olarak tercüme edilen Eray (Golden 1992(Golden (2002: 105) diye bir da~~ oldu~u bildirilmi~tir. Golden, bu kelimeyi *Ak Tag "Akda~" olarak dü~ünmektedir (Golden 1992 ( (Clauson 1971(Clauson (1973(Clauson -1975: 146). ...
... Bat~~ Kök Türk ka~an~n~n ota~~n~~~, Bizans kaynaklannda "Alt~n Da~" olarak tercüme edilen Eray (Golden 1992(Golden (2002: 105) diye bir da~~ oldu~u bildirilmi~tir. Golden, bu kelimeyi *Ak Tag "Akda~" olarak dü~ünmektedir (Golden 1992 ( (Clauson 1971(Clauson (1973(Clauson -1975: 146). Ayr~ca Demir Kap~~ ile ilgili olarak bk. ...
Article
Eski Türk Yazıtlarının ilk kez okunuşundan bu yana yüzyıldan fazla zaman geçmiş olmasına rağmen yazıtlardaki bazı sorunlar hâlledilebilmiş değildir. Özellikle yazıtlarda geçen coğrafi adlar hem tarihçileri hem de dilcileri ilgilendirmiştir. Bu yazıda Tonyukuk Yazıtı'nda geçen Ek Tag ile Menandros'tan nakledilen ve Bizans kaynaklarında geçen Ek Tag'ın aynı yer olup olmadığı incelendi. Sonuç olarak her iki adda yalnızca bir ad benzerliği olduğu ortaya konmaya çalışıldı. Her iki yer adının birbirinden farklı olduğu ve Tonyukuk Yazıtı'nda geçen Ek Tag'ın Alay dağlarının batısında bir yer olduğu önerisi dile getirildi.
... Likewise, the appearance of Avars in Europe in the sixth century, broadly correlates with the collapse of the Rouran Empire. However the possible relations between Xiongnus and Huns as well as Rourans and Avars remains largely controversial due to the scarcity of sources 3 . ...
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Huns, Avars and conquering Hungarians were Migration Period nomadic groups which arrived in three successive waves in the Carpathian Basin between the 5th and 9th centuries. Based on historical data each of these groups are thought to have arrived from Asia, although their exact origin and relation to other ancient and modern populations has been debated. In this study we have sequenced 9 Hun, 143 Avar and 113 Hungarian conquest period samples, and identified three core populations, representing immigrants from each period, with no recent European ancestry. Our results suggest that this immigrant core of both Huns and Avars originated in present day Mongolia, and their origin can be traced back to Xiongnus. On the other hand, the immigrant core of the conquering Hungarians derived from an earlier admixture of Mansis, early Sarmatians and descendants of late Xiongnus. In addition, we detected shared Hun-related ancestry in numerous Avar and Hungarian conquest period genetic outliers indicating a genetic link between these successive nomadic groups. Aside from the immigrant core groups we identified that the majority of the individuals from each period were local residents, harboring native European ancestry.
... The Turkic peoples, a collection of ethnolinguistically related populations originating from Central Asia, were first documented in western Eurasia in the fourth/fifth century BCE and currently live in Central, Eastern, Northern, and Western Asia as well as in parts of Europe and in North Africa. The expansion of Turkic tribes into Western Asia and Eastern Europe occurred between the sixth and 11th centuries, beginning with the Seljuk Turks followed by the Ottomans (2). The sphere of Ottoman influence started to increase greatly, beginning in the 14th century; following the conquest of Constantinople in 1453, the Ottoman Empire controlled a vast region including all of southeastern Europe south of Vienna, parts of Central Europe, Western Asia, the Caucasus, North Africa, and the Horn of Africa. ...
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Thesis
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Thesis
Nomadic Trails for chamber orchestra (2021) is a 14-minute symphonic work in two movements scored for flute/piccolo, oboe, cor anglais, clarinet, contrabassoon/bassoon, 3 trumpets, trombone, bass trombone, 3 percussions, harp, and strings. The work is inspired by the nomadic culture of Uly Dala, the Great Steppe, and traditional Kazakh music, and, through the use of contrasting compositional approaches, addresses the issue of duality taken from the ancient Central Asian religion, Tengriism. In this orchestral work, I blend my musical language with re-constructions and re-interpretations of thematic materials from various well-known küis (solo compositions of oral tradition composed for and performed on the Kazakh instrument, Dombyra) by legendary 19th-century Küishis (composer-performers of küis), such as Kurmangazy Sagyrbaev, Dauletkerey Shigayev, and Dina Nurpeisova. I also explore how different spatial references and historical milieus of the Central Asian nomadic culture can be reflected in a composition written for Western orchestra, and investigate how extra-musical cultural referents, such as Kazakh legends, petroglyphs, and traditional ornaments, can influence the structures and textures of a musical piece. The two movements of Nomadic Trails depict scenes in two different settings: one in the wilderness, and the other in an urban domain: The first movement, “The Great Steppe,” composed in a collage-like form of mini-sections, is inspired by Kazakh legends and petroglyphs, all of which unveil the nomadic stories of the past. The 6-minute movement features melodic quotations taken from three küis: Köroğlu by Dauletkerey, and Qyzyl Qaiyn and Adai by Kurmangazy. Each of the themes in this symphonic medley appear in a kaleidoscopic manner and bring in a different mood, color, tempo and texture. Blurring the borders between abstract and concrete, “The Great Steppe” leaves space to allow the listener to create their own imaginary landscapes. The second movement, “Scenes at the Uralsk Fair,” depicts a celebration of life at a town fair. It is based on the motivic elaborations and de-constructions of thematic materials taken from the küi, Nauai / Nauysky, composed by Dina Nurpeisova, a female Küishi. The complex structure of this contrasting 8-minute movement is an amalgamation of the rondo and variations forms, which strikes a resemblance with the repetitive yet varying structures of Kazakh traditional ornaments. The movement is unified by its fast-moving tempo, syncopated rhythmic patterns and strong pulse that culminates into a whirlwind of vigorous, volcanic bursts describing the bustling atmosphere of the Kazakh town fair.
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