ArticlePDF Available
... Dos estudos mencionados neste trabalho, o biofeedback evidencia eficácia enquanto técnica complementar no controlo do stress em contexto universitário. A literatura mostra que o biofeedback é mais eficaz do que outras terapias sem auxílio (Ratanasiripong, et al., 2010) . ...
... Através do biofeedback, os estudantes aprenderam a produzir ritmos cardíacos associados com emoções positivas, que reduziram os seus níveis de stress e melhorando o seu bem-estar. Grande parte do sucesso deste programa prende-se com a facilidade de uso e gosto pela tecnologia, nomeadamente pelo biofeedback portátil, pois a prática domiciliária entre as sessões na universidade teve uma aceitação de quase 100% dos alunos(Ratanasiripong et al., 2010). Passado um semestre desde a implementação deste projecto, a maioria dos estudantes participantes afirmou ter obtido controlo sobre o stress e a ansiedade, com vários indicadores confirmando a significância desta mudança. ...
Full-text available
Article
Pretende-se partilhar os resultados do estudo feito na rea da avalia o da sintomatologia psicol gica que podem contribuir para reflectir sobre a inclus o do desporto numa configura o de ajuda na vida de um ser humano em sofrimento psicol gico. Est provado que o Desporto faz bem sa de f sica, mas h um longo caminho a percorrer para provar que o desporto faz bem sa de mental. Ser que os sujeitos que praticam desporto t m menos indicadores de sintomatologia psicol gica do que os sujeitos que n o praticam desporto? O estudo encontrou pouca sintomatologia psicol gica no grupo de estudantes de EFD (Educa o F sica e Desporto). Avaliou-se os ndices de solid o e tamb m n o apresentam n veis clinicamente significativos. Os resultados mostram que quem est ligado ao desporto, de certa forma parece ter poucos ind cios de mal-estar psicol gico e poucos n veis de solid o.
... Dos estudos mencionados neste trabalho, o biofeedback evidencia eficácia enquanto técnica complementar no controlo do stress em contexto universitário. A literatura mostra que o biofeedback é mais eficaz do que outras terapias sem auxílio (Ratanasiripong, et al., 2010) . ...
... Através do biofeedback, os estudantes aprenderam a produzir ritmos cardíacos associados com emoções positivas, que reduziram os seus níveis de stress e melhorando o seu bem-estar. Grande parte do sucesso deste programa prende-se com a facilidade de uso e gosto pela tecnologia, nomeadamente pelo biofeedback portátil, pois a prática domiciliária entre as sessões na universidade teve uma aceitação de quase 100% dos alunos(Ratanasiripong et al., 2010). Passado um semestre desde a implementação deste projecto, a maioria dos estudantes participantes afirmou ter obtido controlo sobre o stress e a ansiedade, com vários indicadores confirmando a significância desta mudança. ...
Full-text available
Article
We share the results of a study done in the area of assessment of psychological symptoms which will hopefully help to reflect about the inclusion of sport in a setting aid in the life of a human being with psychological distress. It is proved that sport is good for physical health, but there is a long way to go to prove that sport is good for your mental health. Do the guys who play sports have less indicators of psychological symptoms than subjects who do not practice sport? The study found little psychological symptoms in the group of students from PES (Physical Education and Sport). We evaluated the levels of loneliness in this group of students and did not show clinically significant levels. The results show that those who are connected to sports, somehow seems to have little evidence of psychological discomfort and few levels of loneliness.
... The current study Biological responses to long-term psychological stress and anxiety may cause overall deterioration in an individual's state of health to the extent that they are unable to continue functioning normally [31]. Research by Ratanasiripong et al. illustrated ve key health problems among students as stress and anxiety, followed by psychological, emotional, and academic problems [32]. ...
Full-text available
Preprint
Background: This study explores the effect of a group counselling program in reducing the level of future anxiety and psychological stress among a sample of gifted students. Methods: With a counselling program consisting of 15 sessions, a future anxiety scale, and psychological stress scale. The study sample was divided into two groups, the control group (N= 30), not included in counselling sessions, and the experimental group (N= 30) included in the counselling program. Results: The results showed a statistical analysis of differences between the experimental group and the control group recorded a lower level of future anxiety and psychological stress in the experimental group.
... The cognitive approach focuses on changing learners' own cognitive appraisals (Hashemi & Abbasi 2013;Hismanoglu & Hismanoglu, 2010;Lee, 2016;Mejías, Applebaum, Applebaum, & Trotter, 1991;Nagahashi, 2007). The affective approach attempts to eliminate or reduce the negativity of the foreign language experience (Cinkara, 2016;Ismail, 2016;Oxford, 2015;Ratanasiripong, Sverduk, Hayashino, & Prince, 2010;Siagto-Wakat, 2016). In behavioral approach, premise is that FLA occurs as a result of poor language skills, and attempts to train learners in skills through different methods and techniques (Grant, Huang, & Pasfield-Neofitou, 2014;Lord, 2005;Shams, 2005). ...
Full-text available
Article
This study aimed at proposing a framework based on Integrative Systemic Therapy (IST) for addressing foreign language listening anxiety (FLLA) among Iranian learners of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). The effectiveness of the framework in reducing the levels of FLLA among language learners was investigated when implemented by a therapist as well as by learners independently. To this end, 30 intermediate EFL learners with high level of listening anxiety were selected as participants through convenience sampling. They were then randomly assigned into control group (n=10), therapist group (n=10), and self-therapy group (n=10). The therapist group met with an experienced therapist once a week for a month and self-therapy group was just instructed on how to use the framework independently during the same period. The control group received no treatment. The scale developed by Kim (2000) for measuring FLLA and an IELTS listening test were used to explore the effectiveness of the framework. The results of the study revealed that the proposed framework was effective in reducing the levels of FLLA both when implemented by the therapist and by EFL learners independently. The findings reflected the importance of personalization when selecting foreign language anxiety-reducing strategies to enhance the effectiveness of the foreign language anxiety management.
... environment, they will most likely drop out. Personality traits and perception influence the strategizing process making it easier to cope or more difficult. Colleges offer programs to assist students with academic and personal issues: wellness programs, health education, counseling, tutoring and mentoring, transition programs, and career services (Ratanasiripong, P., et. al, 2010) Studying the process of college adaptation, specifically to religion, may lead to discoveries about what resources should be made available on campus or what academic changes should be made to help students adapt to the college life. ...
Article
The researchers chose to examine religion as a factor in the decision to attend a university and the way that students adapt communicatively to faith-based universities. The concept brought many aspects of communication into play, but only a specific group of theories were applicable to the research findings. The researchers selected two theories to help explain the data: Communication Accommodation Theory and Symbolic Interactionism Theory. Both, Communication Accommodation Theory and Symbolic Interactionism Theory, focus on the decision-making and adaptation aspects of the study.
... Ratanasiripong et al. [29] had two interventional groups within their RCT: whilst one group took part in mindfulness meditation, the other group adapted biofeedback. Biofeedback is a noninvasive intervention in which a mechanical device is utilised to measure a participant's physiological responses, allowing them to learn how to modify these responses through control of their internal process [64]. Vankuiken et al. [33] delivered mindful movement strategies to their study population, in addition to mindfulness meditation. ...
Full-text available
Article
(1) Introduction: Undergraduate (UG) nursing students are vulnerable to stress throughout their education, known to result in burnout, with high attrition rates of up to 33%. There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that mindfulness-based interventions are effective for the management of anxiety, depression and wellbeing, thereby reducing stress in healthcare provider populations. The aim of this narrative review was to synthesize and provide a critical overview of the current evidence in relation to mindfulness-based interventions for UG nursing students in a university setting. (2) Methods: A review of the literature was conducted in March 2020 and updated in May 2021, utilising the databases CINAHL, Medline and PsycINFO. (3) Results: Fifteen studies were included in the review, with three common themes identified: (i) the positive impact of mindfulness on holistic wellbeing, (ii) mindfulness-based techniques as a positive coping mechanism within academic and clinical practice, and (iii) approaches to the delivery of mindfulness-based interventions. (4) Conclusions: Mindfulness-based interventions are effective strategies for the management of stress, development of self-awareness and enhanced academic and clinical performance in undergraduate nursing students. No ideal approach to delivery or duration of these interventions was evident from the literature. Best practice in relation to delivery of mindfulness-based interventions for nursing students is recommended for future studies.
... In this study, three negative aspects of mood state, including tension, fatigue, and depression were selected for the following reasons. First, these are the most prevalent negative mood states experienced by students during their academic life at a university (Ratanasiripong et al., 2010;Ibrahim et al., 2013;Guan and Duan, 2020). Second, the total number of questionnaires was carefully considered. ...
Article
Campus greenness reportedly has a restorative effect on university students by reducing stress and fatigue. This study questioned whether more biodiverse green-spaces have more restorative effects than conventional lawns in campus environments. Unlike most previous studies solely relying on visual stimuli, this study focused on the effect of multisensory (visual and auditory) stimuli on mental restoration, which has been understudied. This study used a four-group pre-posttest-randomized experiment design (2 × 2 factorial design), and a 360-degree view video via an online platform survey. A total of 319 university students were randomly assigned to four experimental settings characterized by: (1) low-biodiversity with no sound, (2) high-biodiversity with no sound, (3) low-biodiversity with sound, and (4) high-biodiversity with sound. The restorative status and mood status at pre-intervention and post-intervention were evaluated using the restorative state scale (RSS) and the Short Form of The Profile of Mood States (POMS-SF). The results indicated that neither the level of biodiversity nor natural sound had a significant effect on restorative and mood states. However, there was a statistically significant interaction effect between auditory and visual stimuli in mood states. The presence of natural sound with a high biodiversity environment showed lower negative mood states than the absence of natural sound. Perceived biodiversity was also examined to clarify the possible association with these psychological responses. The results indicated that perceived plant species richness is positively associated with negative mood states. These discrepancies may be explained by poor biodiversity identification. The findings of this study add to a small but growing literature that indicates that a biodiverse campus environment leads to restorative effects for university students.
... College students present with a variety of challenges related to wellness. For example, heightened levels of stress related to academic pressures, and adjustment concerns (Kausar, 2010;Ratanasiripong, Sverduk, Hayashino, & Prince, 2010), can result in lower self-esteem (Saleh, Camart, & Romo, 2017), lower physical health (Yahia et al., 2016), increased mental health problems such as anxiety and depression (Auerbach et al., 2016), poor performance and high attrition rates (Amirkhan & Kofman, 2018), and ultimately place students at a higher risk for major illness and death (Smith et al., 2013). ...
Article
Research indicates that college students are experiencing mental health challenges of greater severity and frequency. College students present with a variety of wellness-related challenges, resulting in increased demand on campus health resources and service limitations including extended wait lists and increased off-campus referrals. This research study examined the effectiveness of a short-term solution-focused intervention on perceptions of wellness and stress among the college student population. This study utilized a longitudinal, mixed-methods design to assess the impact of a brief (seven-week) intervention on perceived stress and wellness among 52 college students at a large Midwestern University, using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Five-Factor Wellness Evaluation of Lifestyle (5 F-WEL). Repeated measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA) results indicated significant differences across time for perceived stress and wellness (p <.01). To augment quantitative data, a brief, semi-structured interview was completed with 24 study participants post-intervention, and an Applied Thematic Analysis (ATA) was conducted as a means of identifying themes. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of a solution-focused wellness (SFW) approach in changing perceptions of stress and wellness. Findings provide support for a prevention model in which college students are encouraged to proactively engage in lifestyle activities that enhance their wellness.
... So heart-rate-variability helps students to reduce their stress, negative emotion and anxiety [28,76]. From the studies it is also explored that Biofeedback is useful for college and nursing student to reduce any kind of depression during learning stages [74,77]. It also enable students to control themselves during test and exam while they feel nervous and depressed. ...
... The results support the influence of self-construal processes [74] and emotional experiences [75] that have an impact on how wellbeing is understood. While Western models emphasise the need to reduce stress and pressure (e.g., [76][77][78]), participants pointed to the value of negative experiences such as pressure, which can be seen as a positive motivator for improving themselves. One interviewee noted that anxiety or depression at a subclinical level is okay and acceptable as long as it does not affect daily functioning too much. ...
Full-text available
Article
Students at the tertiary education level in Australia are at increased risk of experiencing high levels of psychological distress, with international students at particularly high risk for poor adjustment. As mental health and wellbeing strongly correlate with students’ academic performance and general overseas experience, a growing number of studies focus on what universities can do to effectively support students’ wellbeing. However, assumptions are made about what wellbeing is, strategies primarily focus on treating mental ill-health, and treatment approaches fail to account for cultural differences. This study aimed to explore how Chinese international students understand wellbeing, the language used about and for wellbeing, and activities that students believe strengthen their own and others’ wellbeing. Eighty-four Chinese international students completed the online survey, and a subset of 30 students participated in semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed using thematic, phenomenographic, and language analyses. Physical health and mental health appeared as the key components that participants believed defined wellbeing, and intrapersonal activities were perceived as the primary approach used to strengthen wellbeing. Findings help broaden the understanding of wellbeing concept from the population of tertiary students, identify students’ perspectives of activities that strengthen their wellbeing, offer a snapshot of the language used by Chinese students around wellbeing, and provide new data of population health through a wellbeing lens.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.