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A new species of Sunipia (Orchidaceae) from Nepal

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Abstract

Sunipia nepalensis, a new orchid species from Nepal is described and illustrated. Notes to distinguish it from related taxa are provided.
Accepted by M. Fay: 23 Sept. 2011; published: 24 Oct. 2011 55
PHYTOTAXA
ISSN 1179-3155 (print edition)
ISSN 1179-3163 (online edition)
Copyright © 2011 Magnolia Press
Phytotaxa 31: 5558 (2011)
www.mapress.com/phytotaxa/Article
A new species of Sunipia (Orchidaceae) from Nepal
BHAKTA BAHADUR RASKOTI* & RITA ALE
Pokharathok 9 Arghakhanchi, Nepal
*E-mail: bbraskoti@gmail.com
Abstract
Sunipia nepalensis, a new orchid species from Nepal is described and illustrated. Notes to distinguish it from related taxa
are provided.
Key words: orchid, taxonomy, Himalaya
Introduction
Sunipia Lindley (1826: 21, 25), (including Ione Lindl.) is a genus of about 23 species in the world (Govaerts
et al. 2011) restricted to southeast Asia. Until now it is known from Bhutan, China, India, Laos, Myanmar,
Nepal, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam (Seidenfaden 1969, 1986, Pearce & Cribb 2002, Chen & Vermeulen
2009). In Nepal Sunipia is represented by three species, namely S. bicolor Lindley (1833: 179), S. cirrhata
(Lindl.) Hunt (1971:184) and S. scariosa Lindley (1833: 179, = S. racemosa (Smith) Tang & Wang 1951: 90).
A species of Sunipia was collected by the first author during an orchid survey in the Daman Makawanpur
District, central Nepal. The characteristics of this plant do not match any of the previously described species
in the genus. Therefore it is illustrated and described here as a new species.
Species description
Sunipia nepalensis B.B.Raskoti & R.Ale, sp. nov. Figs. 1 & 2.
Species Sunipia candida affinis, sed inflorescentiis pendens, 2–3 flores, petalis late ovatis, apex obtusis, labello medio
vesiculosis et marginibus integris differt.
Type:—NEPAL. Makawanpur District: Daman, Simbhanjyang ca. 27 degrees 36' N and 85 degrees 03' E,
2400 m, May 2008, B.B. Raskoti 270 (holotype KATH, isotype TUCH).
Epiphytic herbs. Rhizomes terete, stout, creeping, dark brown, 4 mm thick, enveloped by overlapping tubular
papery sheaths. Roots numerous, rigid, wiry, flexuose. Pseudobulbs obliquely ovoid-conical, apex 1-leaved,
greenish, 14 cm apart, 1.01.8 cm long and 23 cm in diameter, lower half enclosed by a transparent, net-
veined sheath. Leaves ligulate-lanceolate, apex subacute, obscurely bilobed, leathery, 3.08.5 cm long, 0.7
1.5 cm wide. Inflorescences pendulous, arising laterally from the base of the pseudobulb, 13-flowered, 3.5
5.0 cm long; peduncles slender, with 3 overlapping brown membranous tubular sheaths. Floral bracts
lanceolate, apices acute, concave, brownish, tinged purple-brown, ca. 7 × 2 mm. Pedicels terete, 10 mm long.
Flowers widely opening, 15 mm wide, sepals pale greenish white with five purple veins of which only one
... Of them, 18 are endemic (Rajbhandari, 2014). Given that new findings 6 6 are still reported every year, systematic studies may reveal that there are far more species in the orchid family in Nepal yet to be discovered Rai et al., 2013Rai et al., , 2014Raskoti & Ale, 2011Kolanowska et al., 2015;Rajbhandari, 2015). ...
... Dendrobium was the most frequently spotted genus in both sites, followed by Pinalia, Bulbophyllum, Otochilus, Pholidota, Ceologyne, Cymbidium, Goodyera, Calanthe and Gastrochilus in descending order of frequency. One species newly discovered and endemic to Nepal, Sunipia nepalensis (Raskoti & Ale, 2011) was found in KCF. Both areas are highly diverse in orchid species. ...
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Book
Will our children have the chance to discover new plant-based medicines when the need arises? Will they share the same privileges as we posses, to enjoy myriads of orchids blooming in local forests? And, most importantly, will they even want to conserve the Nepali floral treasure trove? At the current rate of habitat degradation and exploitation with the consequent endangerment of flora species, there is no guarantee anymore.
... In Nepal, 450 orchid species are reported from 107 genera, among which 18 species have been known to be endemic (Rajbhandari 2014). Further systematic studies may reveal additional species of the family in Nepal, as new findings are still being reported every year (Raskoti & Ale 2011, 2013Raskoti & Kurzweil 2015;Raskoti 2012Raskoti , 2013Raskoti , 2015Gajurel et al. 2013;Raskoti et al. 2013;Rai et al. 2013Rai et al. , 2014Rajbhandari 2015). ...
... Dendrobium was a genus frequently spotted among the study sites, followed by Bulbophyllum, Otochilus, Pholidota, Gastrochilus, Pinalia, Coelogyne, Cymbidium, Goodyera and Calanthe. Bulbophyllum raskotii is reported from its type locality in KCF (Raskoti & Ale 2011). Out of the 58 species recorded from the two community forests, 29 species have been recognized with medicinal values (Table 1) (Fig. 1). ...
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Presentation
Orchidaceae is one of the largest and most diverse families of flowering plants, comprising above 450 species that span 107 genera in Nepal. Since the orchids are facing pressure of various anthropogenic factors at local, regional, national, and global level, we attempted to explore the diversity of orchids in two community managed forests – Karunabhumi community forest at Daman and Chandragiri community forest at Chitlang of Makawanpur district, Central Nepal. With the introduction of community forestry program in Nepal, some progress are happening in conserving the habitats of orchids, which has minimized the unsystematic and illegal collection of orchids, and cutting and falling down of trees which are the habitat for epiphytic species. We compiled 58 species of orchids from 23 genera including 47 epiphytic and 11 terrestrial with 29 species having medicinal uses. Out of 58 recorded species, Gastrochilus calceolaris recorded as Critically Endangered (CR) and Bulbophyllum leopardinum and Spiranthes sinensis as Least Concern (LC) species belonged to category of IUCN. In our study the local people were also involved in the exploration, thus the stakeholders realized the necessity of conservation of orchids, an important component of biodiversity.
... During botanical surveys in Southwest China from 2017 to 2020, we collected a great number of orchid species. After comparing the morphological features of collected specimens with those of herbarium specimens (i.e., taxa similar to Cheirostylis Blume, Myrmechis Blume and Bulbophyllum Thouars) and consulting relevant literature (for Cheirostylis, see Hemsley, 1895;Rolfe, 1896Rolfe, , 1903Seidenfaden, 1978;Jin et al., 2007a, b;Chen et al., 2009;Liu et al., 2016b;Wu et al., 2020; for Myrmechis, see Rolfe, 1903;Seidenfaden, 1978;Maity et al., 2007; for Bulbophyllum, see Summerhayes, 1928;Seidenfaden, 1969Seidenfaden, , 1979Lin, 1975;Tsi, 1989;Chen et al., 2009;Raskoti and Ale, 2011;Vermeulen et al., 2015;Averyanov et al., 2015Averyanov et al., , 2018Averyanov et al., , 2019Liu et al., 2017;Zhai et al., 2017;Li et al., 2019;Ya et al., 2019a;Ma et al., 2020), we confirmed that eight species are new to science and three species are new records for China. Here, these species are described and illustrated ...
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