Article

Sources of Stress among College Students

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... The college years are a period which can be filled with a great deal of stress [1]. The sources of stress may be related to a change in environment, workload, and responsibilities which students take on in the college setting. ...
... The necessity to adjust to an increase in academic workload and a demand of financial responsibility are both major contributors of stress. [1] Once this acclimation has been met, college students are then faced with a number of other stressors during the remainder of their college years. ...
... Sources of stress in college aged individuals are consistent throughout studies with the most common stressors being identified as academic, financial, family, social, and daily hassle. [1,2,3] In a sample of 212 college students, 75% of participants reported a moderate level of stress, 12% reported a high level of stress, and only 13% reported a low level of stress. [4] When examining stress and academic performance in college students, students' stress scores were identified as a statistically significant predictor of academic performance. ...
... Previous instruments designed to assess postsecondary student stress demonstrate substantial measurement weaknesses. Few involved a diverse sample of students in the development process (eg, engaging students only in a particular year, level, or program of study [15][16][17][18]), while others are too narrow (eg, items based solely on the literature or with little consideration for student input [19]) or too broad (eg, including stress-related items not relevant to the postsecondary setting [20]). In other cases, the process of development has not been disclosed at all, making it difficult to judge the validity of the instrument [15]. ...
... In other cases, the process of development has not been disclosed at all, making it difficult to judge the validity of the instrument [15]. Additionally, the majority of existing instruments demonstrate weak validity and reliability [16,18,21] or have not been psychometrically assessed [19]. Finally, the majority of these instruments assess only a single element of stress, either the severity or the frequency of occurrence but not both. ...
Article
Background The prevalence of mental health–related problems, including stress, psychological distress, and symptoms of mental illnesses, continues to increase among Canadian postsecondary student populations. Excessive stress in this population has been linked to a number of negative academic and health outcomes. Despite attempts to improve mental health at postsecondary institutions, a persistent gap exists in the evaluation of the specific sources of stress for students within the postsecondary setting. Objective The purpose of this paper is to report the study protocol for a cross-Canada, multisite launch of the Post-Secondary Student Stressors Index (PSSI), which will engage postsecondary institutions across the country as partners and facilitate improved measurement of the sources of student stress, in addition to contributing toward improved tailoring of upstream mental health services and support. Methods Created in collaboration with students, the PSSI is a validated 46-item tool assessing stressors across five domains: academics, learning environment, campus culture, interpersonal, and personal stressors. The tool is designed to be applicable to students at all years, levels, and areas of study. Data will be collected longitudinally at multiple time points over the course of each academic year. Results We recruited 15 postsecondary institutions across Canada for the first year, inviting students to participate in an online survey including questions concerning sociodemographic characteristics, stress, mental health, and resiliency. Analyses, including appropriate data visualization, will be conducted to determine the impact of specific stressors on mental health, linking responses over time to allow for the observation of changes in trends. Conclusions The PSSI is an intuitive and evidence-informed tool that can aid postsecondary institutions in evaluating the sources of student stress on their campuses. This multisite project will make a substantial contribution to the current literature regarding postsecondary student stress and allow institutions across the country to improve the tailoring of upstream mental health services in order to directly support the unique needs of their student body. Opportunities for knowledge translation and exchange are discussed. International Registered Report Identifier (IRRID) DERR1-10.2196/27713
... To examine heightened false-alarms as a risk factor for later GAD and SAD symptoms, first year college students in their fall semester completed a fear generalization and avoidance task that included false-alarms of conditioned threat which were then analyzed as predictors of GAD/SAD symptoms during the following spring semester. First-year college students are an apt population for this work given they are close to the age that many clinical anxiety issues first develop (Kessler et al., 2005) and are undergoing a highly stressful life transition (Lapsley, Rice, & Shadid, 1989;Ross, Niebling, & Heckert, 1999;Dyson & Renk, 2006) that is known to facilitate the development of novel anxiety symptoms (Doane, Gress-Smith, & Breitenstein, 2015;Furr, Westefeld, McConnell, & Jenkins, 2001;Pryor, Hurtado, DeAngelo, Blake, & Tran, 2010;Sax, Bryant, & Gilmartin, 2004). Furthermore, a focus on GAD and SAD is particularly warranted given they are the most common and distressing mental health problems among undergraduate students according to recent nationwide survey (Center for Collegiate Mental Health, 2018). ...
... (For interpretation of the references to colour in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.) toward false alarms of conditioned threat could predict longitudinal changes in anxiety symptoms over the first year of college-a stressful transitionary period known to stimulate the development of novel anxiety issues (Dyson & Renk, 2006;Lapsley et al., 1989;Ross et al., 1999;Larson, 2002). We chose to focus on: a) behavioral rather than psychophysiological threat responses as predictors, given their greater potential for clinical translation (Lenaert et al., 2014), and b) GAD and SAD symptoms as outcomes, as these are the most frequent and distressing anxiety disorders among college students (e.g., Center for Collegiate Mental Health, 2018) and have yet to be examined in longitudinal conditioning studies. ...
Article
Lab-based fear-conditioning studies have repeatedly implicated exaggerated threat reactivity to benign (unreinforced) stimuli as concurrent markers of clinical anxiety, but little work has examined the strength of false alarms as a longitudinal predictor of anxiety problems. As such, we tested whether heightened false alarms of conditioned threat assessed in participants’ first semester of college predicted second-semester symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and social anxiety disorder (SAD) – two anxiety conditions that are common in college students, have been associated with excessive false alarms, and have yet to be assessed with longitudinal conditioning designs. Here, we focused on the predictive effects of behavioral threat responses (threat expectancy, subjective anxiety, avoidance) given their greater potential for translation to the clinic. Results implicate conditioning-related increases in anxiety to safe stimuli resembling the danger-cue as prospective predictors of GAD. In contrast, SAD was predicted by non-specific elevations in anxiety to a broad set of safe stimuli, as well as by increased threat expectancy toward cues least resembling the conditioned danger cue. These findings suggest that risk for GAD and SAD are captured by distinct, behavioral indicators of false-alarms that may be more feasibly collected in clinical settings compared to alternative experimental anxiety measures like psychophysiological responses.
... Experienced stress is the amount of stress students encounter in their lives across different domains over a certain period. This variable is typically measured using a checklist format, where students indicate whether they have experienced the specific stress over a specific time period (e.g., the last month; Ross et al., 1999). ...
... Experienced stress. In addition to perceived academic stress, we also measured experienced stress using the Student Stress Survey (SSS; Ross et al., 1999). The SSS contains 40 items to measure potential sources of stress. ...
Article
Research on college student stress has typically focused on institutions where the student population is predominately White and continuing-generation. This study explored student stress in a unique context—a public regional university where the majority of students are Latinx, first-generation (FGCS), and of low socioeconomic status (SES). Of the 355 participants in the study, 72.4% self-identified as Latinx and 59.7% were FGCS. Additionally, on a subjective scale of socioeconomic status (1 = lowest, 10 = highest), the mean response was 5.76 ( SD = 1.56). Participants (18 years old or older) who were enrolled in a first-year seminar course were recruited for this study. Through an online survey during Fall 2018, first-year students reported levels of perceived and experienced stress related to academic, economic, intrapersonal, and interpersonal concerns. Results of regression analyses indicated that most types of stress were predicted by students’ Latinx identity status and SES; FGCS status did not significantly predict stress. These findings highlight the need to explore solutions to address stress for Latinx and/or low SES students. Additionally, the study underscores the necessity of conducting research at educational institutions in which Latinx, FGC, and low SES students comprise the majority of the student body.
... Another example can be seen when students enter a new academic environment. A relevant study shows that these students will confront abundant requirements such as time pressure, homesickness, matching with college members, and anxiety [20]. ...
Article
This study aims to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Academic Expectations of Stress Inventory (AESI) in terms of validity and reliability measurements among Persian students. A total sample of 620 high-school students (nfemale = 328, nmale = 292) was recruited to complete scales on academic expectations of stress, self-efficacy, and depression. The AESI was translated from English to Persian and its translation was further checked by three experts. We used a cross-sectional research design to collect data. The results approved the internal consistency, test–retest reliability, convergent, and construct validity of the ASEI. Additionally, confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the two-factor structure of the AESI, including the expectation of self and the expectations of parents/teachers. AESI was related to depression and self-efficacy in an empirically and theoretically expected direction. Moreover, configural and metric invariance were supported by gifted vs. non-gifted groups, but not scalar. No invariance was supported by gender groups. In conclusion, the psychometric properties of the Persian version of the AESI were confirmed to be used for educational, clinical, and research purposes in Iran.
... Young university students are a population who consistently report high levels of stress (American College Health Association, 2017;Casey, 2014;Larcombe et al., 2016). Research has also identified that students experience a unique group of stressors, such as the need to perform academically while balancing their studies with other responsibilities (Pitt et al., 2018;Ross et al., 1999). The use of problem-focussed coping strategies is particularly relevant for university students, due to their most salient source of stress commonly being academic-related and within their control (Jensen et al., 2016;Pitt et al., 2018). ...
Article
Stress management interventions have traditionally aimed to change coping behavior with little attention to mechanisms that drive behavior change. We sought to test an integrated dual-process model, accounting for reasoned and automatic processes, for predicting problem-focused coping behavior. The study adopted a two-wave prospective correlational design with a 1-week follow-up. University students aged 17–25 (N = 272) completed survey measures online. At Time 1, participants completed self-report measures of attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, intention, behavioral automaticity, and past problem-focused coping behavior. At Time 2, participants completed follow-up measures of behavioral automaticity and problem-focused coping behavior. Structural equation modelling testing the hypothesized dual-process model exhibited a good fit to the data, accounting for 50.0% and 45.4% of the variance in intentions and problem-focused coping behavior, respectively. Attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and past behavior directly predicted intention. Intention, past behavior, and behavioral automaticity directly predicted problem-focused coping behavior. Past behavior also indirectly predicted problem-focused coping behavior via behavioral automaticity. Results suggest that problem-focused coping behavior tends to be regulated by reasoned psychological processes, and more strongly by automatic psychological processes. Future research aiming to increase problem-focused coping should utilize behavior change methods known to influence these processes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
... Página | 4 Misra e McKean (2000) observaram que as mulheres tendem a apresentar maior nível de estresse acadêmico do que os homens e que a ansiedade e a dificuldade de organização do tempo são os principais preditores do estresse acadêmico. Ross, Niebling e Heckert (1999), utilizando a escala The student stress survey para determinar as maiores fontes de estresse entre universitários, observaram que 38% das fontes de estresse identificadas eram relativas ao âmbito intrapessoal, 28% ao ambiental, 19% ao interpessoal e 15% ao nível acadêmico, sendo possível observar que fatores extraclasse podem influenciar diretamente no processo de ansiedade e de estresse desses estudantes. ...
... The transition to college typically involves a number of significant changes that are stressful for many students (e.g., changes in residence, finances, social networks, social activities, responsibilities, etc.; Ross et al., 1999). Increases in belongingness during the first year of college have been associated with increased psychological well-being (Pittman & Richmond, 2008). ...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Explanations for associations between social norms and drinking often focus on wanting to fit in, gain social approval, and/or avoid social exclusion. From this perspective, students who believe that drinking is strongly linked to social approval should be more motivated to drink, especially if their sense of social approval or belongingness in college is low. To evaluate this hypothesis, we examined changes in drinking as a function of fluctuations in perceived injunctive norms (i.e., perceptions of others' approval of drinking) and belongingness (i.e., one's sense of social belonging in college). Method: Participants included 383 (60% women) nonabstaining students who, beginning in their first or second year of college, completed assessments every 3 months over a 2-year period. Data were analyzed using multilevel mixed-effects negative binomial models followed by marginal tests to evaluate nonlinear interactions. Results: Within-person results indicated that when individuals believed other students were more approving of alcohol, they subsequently increased their drinking, which is especially true when individuals' sense of belongingness was at or below average. Between-person effects revealed overall positive associations of injunctive norms and belongingness with drinking. In addition, greater alcohol consumption among individuals with higher injunctive norms was less evident among students with lower average levels of belongingness. Conclusions: Perceiving others as more approving of drinking corresponds to increased drinking only when personal levels of belongingness are at or below average. Elevated feelings of belongingness may buffer social influences on drinking. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).
... Based on a large sample of both students and lecturers in the U.S., Misra et al. (2000) found that study-related stress invoked strong negative emotional responses and symptoms that are significantly associated with burnout, varying from severe fear, anxiety, worry, or anger to crying, and to abusing themselves and others physically and emotionally. Ross et al. (1999), Jacobs and Dodd (2003), and Robotham and Julian (2006) provide quantitative evidence in which increased (perceived) workload in class and getting lower grades than anticipated are identified as major sources of stress, potentially leading to burnout and, consequently, deviant behavior as an (often desperate) coping mechanism (Jacobs & Dodd, 2003). ...
Article
Full-text available
Bribery is a complex and critical issue in higher education (HE), causing severe economic and societal harm. Traditionally, most scholarship on HE corruption has focused on institutional factors in developing countries and insights into the psychological and motivational factors that drive HE bribery on the micro-level mechanisms are virtually non-existent. To close this research gap, this study investigates the connection between study-related burnout and university students' willingness to offer bribes to their lecturers to pass important exams. Conducting a vignette-based quasi-experimental replication study with 624 university students in Germany, Belgium, and the Netherlands we find that university students in three countries differentiate sharply between different shades of bribery and that a majority accept using emotional influence tactics to pass (failed) exams. In contrast, offering a helping hand or money (i.e., darker shades of bribery) to their lecturer was less acceptable. Study-related burnout is associated with a higher likelihood of engaging in these darker shades of bribery and students' commitment to the public interest is but a weak factor in preventing unethical behavior. In summary, this study provides solid empirical evidence that university students are likely to use emotional influence tactics violating both the ethical codes of conduct and the formalized bureaucratic procedures of HE examination, particularly if they suffer from study-related burnout. However, the accelerating effect of burnout on bribery is conditional in that it only holds for darker shades of bribery. HE institutions may benefit from implementing the four-eye principle and from launching awareness campaigns that enable lecturers to better recognize these tactics and engage students in creating a transparent environment for testing, grading, and collaboration that is resistant to bribery. Supplementary information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s11162-021-09669-1.
... Stress is a normal response to these types of situations of distress (Horwitz, 2007;Wheatonb& Montazer,2010). Stress disturbs our sleeping and eating patterns (Lund et al.,2010;Pawlow& Malcolm, 2003;Nédélec, 2015), which leads to irritability or emotional outbursts (Mayes et al.,2015), low motivation (McClelland & Jemmott III, 1980), and change in habits (Ross et al., 1999), use of alcohol or other drugs (Breslau et al., 2003). It ultimately takes the form of social causes in a wider form.Therefore, concepts like emotional wellness which relates to "understanding one's feelings and coping effectively with stress"; financial wellness which involves "the process of learning how to successfully manage financesincomes and expenses"; occupational wellness which "is about enjoying one's occupational endeavors and appreciating one's own contributions thereto to family and society"; social wellness which helps "one perform one's social roles effectively and comfortably, and helps create a support network of friends and family" should be discussed, analyzed and communicated in the society to increase the overall well-being of society as a whole. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
The COVID-19 has affected physical and psychological well-being adversely. Besides causing large-scale damage to peoples’ livelihoods, the pandemic has caused grievous injury to people’s psyche as well as psychosocial well-being. Sheer magnitude and intensity of devastation caused by the pandemic forces us to reflect seriously on how crucial psychosocial well-being from the viewpoint of coming to terms with the havoc caused by COVID-19. This chapter proposes to unravel varied facets of psychosocial well-being by first developing a conceptual understanding of it, and then analyze issues and challenges that people have been facing in India and elsewhere in the world during post-pandemic times. In common parlance, psychosocial well-being implies a blend of mental and social health. Whereas the former signifies psychological wellness, the latter points toward how well and meaningfully we can relate to people in the society at large. If we share a good rapport with them, we feel happy, nice and cared for; in case we cannot get along well with people in our community or society, we may remain peeved, anxious and irritated. Psychosocial wellness therefore depends on diverse range of real-life experiences, interpersonal behavior, happiness and satisfaction. COVID-19 pandemic has caused so much damage that it has caused deep harm to our physical, emotional, social, spiritual and psychological health. Being conceptual in nature, this chapter employs qualitative method of research by analyzing data from secondary sources such as websites, reports, and other sources to build our perspective. The insights arrived at conceptually shall be discussed in the last part of the chapter where we have suggested a way ahead via suggesting strategies that may have meaningful implications if visualized, planned and executed properly.
... Of course, concerns about student distress and increasing demands on university support services are not new, nor limited to the UK (Auerbach et al., 2018;Dogan, 2018;Stewart-Brown et al., 2000;Watkins, Hunt, & Eisenberg, 2012). At the individual level, established intrapersonal constructs such as self-efficacy, academic confidence, locus of control, and coping abilities have all been reported to be correlates of students' stress and adjustment to university (Abouserie, 1994;Aherne, 2001;Au, 2015;Misra, McKean, West, & Russo, 2000;Ross, Neibling, & Heckert, 1999), and predictors of distress (Hunt & Eisenberg, 2010). ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The mental health of students in UK higher education (HE) is receiving increased attention, and support services for students are under increased pressure. Aims: Drawing on ecological systems theory (EST), this study sought to explore possible contextual influences, over time, on student distress within HE. Method and samples: We conducted a two-stage Delphi study, first asking UK professionals (n = 236) from primary, secondary, further education, and HE to provide possible reasons for increases in student distress. The material was reduced to 58 representative statements across all sectors with a further 10 specific to HE. In stage 2, 89 participants rated each statement in terms of whether it: (1) takes place and (2) contributes to distress. Results: The results suggest multiple contextual influences potentially contributing to student distress. They can be summarized using the words: cuts, competition, and comparison. Education professionals in our sample reported that, upstream from HE, pressures on schools and colleges have led to a narrowing of curricula, with a more singular focus on assessment. Reduced teaching teams and pressurized staff unintentionally embed an assessment focus within students who unhelpfully compare themselves with peers while also struggling with wider societal cuts, austerity, and political uncertainty. Conclusions: The discussion draws on the peer-reviewed literature and relevant reports, discussing them in the context of EST, finding considerable support for these influences. The potential importance of adopting a contextual approach and incorporating this knowledge into the way we understand and tackle students' distress and their preparedness for HE is discussed.
... Engineering classes are infamous for their competitive, social Darwinist approach to education, where only the "strongest" and "most capable" students are expected to "survive" (Jensen & Cross, 2021;Leslie et al., 2015;Stevens et al., 2007aStevens et al., , 2007b. This environment produces a uniquely stressful experience for students, particularly those marginalized in STEM and academia (women and Black, Indigenous, and Latinx students; Behere et al., 2011;Ross et al., 1999;Wei et al., 2011). This stress can negatively affect students' belonging and retention in a field with a growing need for graduating professionals and greater diversity. ...
Article
Full-text available
All college students report high levels of stress, but engineering departments pose additional challenges that the field seeks to address. However, a focus solely on remedying stress may not be enough to resolve the issue, as research suggests that coping with stress requires skills different from those needed to thrive and function optimally. This study examines the complex relationships between wellbeing, stress, and belonging by examining survey responses from 2,285 U.S. engineering undergraduate students from 17 universities. Latent profile analysis was used to identify wellness and stress profiles across ten constructs (including meaning and purpose, mindfulness, test anxiety, and stress reactivity). Hierarchical regressions were used to examine the explanatory potential of the identified profiles and their role as moderators of students’ experiences and belonging in engineering. Results suggest that there are clearly distinguishable patterns of wellness and stress across students’ reported experiences, and that these profiles are more than merely descriptive. These findings are discussed in relation to engineering education’s unique stress culture and the pursuit of student wellbeing and belonging.
... Stress is a normal response to these types of situations of distress (Horwitz, 2007;Wheatonb& Montazer,2010). Stress disturbs our sleeping and eating patterns (Lund et al.,2010;Pawlow& Malcolm, 2003;Nédélec, 2015), which leads to irritability or emotional outbursts (Mayes et al.,2015), low motivation (McClelland & Jemmott III, 1980), and change in habits (Ross et al., 1999), use of alcohol or other drugs (Breslau et al., 2003). It ultimately takes the form of social causes in a wider form.Therefore, concepts like emotional wellness which relates to "understanding one's feelings and coping effectively with stress"; financial wellness which involves "the process of learning how to successfully manage financesincomes and expenses"; occupational wellness which "is about enjoying one's occupational endeavors and appreciating one's own contributions thereto to family and society"; social wellness which helps "one perform one's social roles effectively and comfortably, and helps create a support network of friends and family" should be discussed, analyzed and communicated in the society to increase the overall well-being of society as a whole. ...
Book
Full-text available
Families do not exist in isolation and family dynamics are often best inter�preted in psycho-social context. Counseling professionals and practitioners must consider unique family dynamics while counseling and therapies. In the same context, an attempt has been made to provide various psycho- social changes within the families through various research insights based on qualitative re�searches conducted by Indian and Romanian researchers, academicians and practitioners working in the field of human behavior dynamics.
... Stress is a major and prevalent concern among college students, and as many as three out of four college students consider themselves to be stressed [53]. Many personal and academic life factors and environmental stressors precipitate college student stress [75]. Unfortunately, there are major impediments to seeking mental health services for college students, such as stigma and lack of timely and proactive care [31,32]. ...
Article
Full-text available
The post-college transition is a critical period where individuals experience unique challenges and stress before, during, and after graduation. Individuals often use social media to discuss and share information, advice, and support related to post-college challenges in online communities. These communities are important as they fill gaps in institutional support between college and post-college plans. We empirically study the challenges and stress expressed on social media around this transition as students graduate college and move into emerging adulthood. We assembled a dataset of about 299,000 Reddit posts between 2008 and 2020 about the post-college transition from 10 subreddits. We extracted top concerns, challenges, and conversation points using unsupervised Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA). Then, we combined the results of LDA with binary transfer learning to identify stress expressions in the dataset (classifier performance at F1=0.94). Finally, we explore temporal patterns in stress expressions, and the variance of per-topic stress levels throughout the year. Our work highlights more deliberate and focused understanding of the post-college transition, as well as useful research and design impacts to study transient cohorts in need of support.
... Tuntutan eksternal tersebut dapat bersumber dari beban mata kuliah, tugas-tugas kuliah, tuntutan orang tua ataupun keluarga untuk berhasil di kuliahnya. Selain itu tuntutan dalam hubungan sosial juga kerap dihadapi oleh mahasiswa, seperti menjalin hubungan baik antar teman, bekerja sama dalam kelompok, serta mengikuti unit kegiatan mahasiswa atau organisasi mahasiswa (Ross, Niebling, & Heckert, 1999). Tuntutan ini juga termasuk kompetensi dalam perkuliahan dan meningkatnya kompleksitas materi perkuliahan yang semakin lama tingkatannya semakin sulit. ...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to examine the correlation between coping strategies and academic resilience in medical faculty students. The research subjects in this study were 70 active students of the Medical Faculty of Universitas Muhammadiyah Purwokerto who were selected using proportionate stratified random sampling. The data were analysed using the Analysis of Product Moment through the help of SPSS 22 for Windows. Correlation values r = 0.615 and p = 0.000 (p<0.01) was obtained in this study which indicated that there was a positive and significant correlation between coping strategies and academic resilience. Coping strategies provide an effective contribution of 37.8% to academic resilience. However, there are 62.2% of other factors such as strong social skills, interpersonal skills and social support that affect academic resilience.
... Adolescence is a crucial transition period from childhood to adulthood, during which teenagers experience many challenges that can ultimately affect their health. These challenges can also be referred to as stressors, and can be intrapersonal (e.g., changes in sleeping and eating habits), academic (e.g., increased class workload), interpersonal (e.g., change in social activities) and environmental (e.g., increased screen time) (Ross et al., 1999). Stress is a multidimensional term. ...
Article
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an 8-week stress management intervention to enhance resilience and coping techniques and decrease stress in adolescent students. Teenagers, 11 to 17 years old, recruited from two tertiary Adolescent Medicine Centers of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, were randomly assigned into two groups: the stress management group (n=24) and the control group (n=25). Resilience, stress, anxiety, everyday use of social media, school performance and cognitive skills were measured in adolescents of both groups, pre- and post-intervention. Post-intervention, the stress management group had significantly higher resilience scores and school performance self-evaluation scores, lower scores of stress, anxiety and everyday use of social media and better cognitive skills than the control group. Regarding cognitive skills, the stress management group significantly improved the speed of information processing and memory. Adolescents following stress management experienced significantly reduced stress from interacting with teachers/parents, from peer pressure, from school/leisure conflict as well as compulsive behaviours. With respect to resilience, the intervention improved adolescents’ individual skills and resources, relationships with primary caregivers, and environmental factors that facilitated the sense of belonging. Future studies of large adolescent samples are required to evaluate the long-term benefits of stress management techniques on adolescents' health and resilience, as well as the need of continued support to preserve these benefits throughout transition to adulthood.
... 3 The condition of burnout has long been studied, since it was first described by Freudenberger,4 and is often reported among college students. 1,5 Students enrolled in medical or healthcare programs have been identified as at risk for experiencing burnout, mostly due to the time demands and expectations placed upon them to balance curricular expectations as well as patient care duties. [6][7][8][9][10] Burnout has been reported among medical students, nursing students, and physical therapy students, as well as athletic training students (ATSs). ...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: College students are at a risk for increased levels of stress and burnout, and those enrolled in healthcare degree programs are more likely to experience higher levels due to balancing demanding roles. Our purpose was to assess sources of stress, burnout, and/or frustration in athletic training students (ATSs) of different academic standings. Methods: Data were collected through the use of an original, 33-question questionnaire. An inductive approach was used to analyze the data and multiple analyst triangulation and interpretive member checks were used to secure credibility. Results: 27 male and female ATSs from freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior classes from one institution voluntarily participated within this study. We were able to identify distinct themes of stress and burnout for each class of ATSs. Freshman reported concern for the time demand from the major and a desire to have more hands-on activity involved with their clinical education experiences. The sophomores reported feeling stressed regarding the expectation to retain information and the expectations to perform hands-on duties, as well as their ability to balance academic and clinical responsibilities. Challenging coursework, pressure during clinical experiences, and social conflicts appeared as themes for the junior ATSs. Finally, the seniors stated a fear of not achieving professional proficiency was a source of frustration. Conclusions and Recommendations: Based on our findings, efforts should be made to assist student time management practices, improve communication between preceptors and students, and make expectations of the athletic training program (ATP) faculty and preceptors clear. Such measures could help influence other positive changes within ATPs to improve the learning environment for ATSs.
... College also introduces personal concerns, which include (a) nances, (b) time management, (c) homesickness, and (d) new responsibilities (e.g., Abrica & Martinez, 2016;Ross et al., 1999). A 2006 study reported that 64% of freshman had some or major concerns regarding their ability to nance college costs (Hurtado & Pryor), and these types of nancial concerns persist (Montalto et al., 2019). ...
... Females were more likely to choose healthier foods as fresh fruits and vegetables in accordance with their higher nutrition literacy status as compared to males (3,4). However, in other cases females tended to consume more carbohydrates, fatty foods or snack items under stress as compared to males (5,6). Males on the other hand were likely to purchase alcoholic or energy beverages (7,8). ...
... Challenges imposed by financial hardship and study pressure should not be dismissed. It is already challenging to try to adjust to the multifaceted demands and increasing pressures of tertiary education at the best of times [22,46]. However, studying at a postgraduate level in a new country away from your own family provides unique opportunities for increased stress for international students. ...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the stresses and wellbeing of international postgraduate health and nursing students at a tertiary education institute in New Zealand who were mainly essential frontline healthcare workers during the COVID-19 lockdown. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected by purposeful sampling (n = 43). The study utilised a cross-sectional survey, along with the Short Form of Cohen’s Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), adapted for the COVID-19 lockdown, and followed by semi-structured individual interviews. This study is the first in New Zealand to demonstrate that, with a mean PSS-10 score of 21.7 (±7.1), international health students experienced higher than optimal levels of stress, with supporting qualitative data identifying four themes for the sources of stress: (1) familial relationships, (2) essential work, (3) finances, and (4) study. However, these students coped because of the extensive support provided by their education institute and employers. These students played a critical role in the pandemic’s response and made a significant public health contribution by working in the frontline of the COVID-19 outbreak. Considering the global shortage of healthcare workers and understanding the key challenges, means of coping and support provisions, as we have here, offer insights for building and maintaining a resilient and resourceful health workforce through international health and nursing students in New Zealand and elsewhere.
... interpretation of the stressor and if appraised negatively the stressor can cause significant distress (Misra & Mckean, 2000). Another study that found daily life hassles to be more stressful to students than significant life events outlined increase in workload, vacations, modified eating habits, increase in workload and additional responsibilities as the major sources of stress (Ross, Niebling, & Heckert, 1999). ...
... In addition to the pandemic, there are a variety of contributors to students' stress, such as having to balance the demands of classes, work, extracurricular activities, a social life and academic performance (Ferrer et al., 2014). Prolonged stress may lead to deteriorating academic performance, which may influence students' participation in campus activities and increase the risk of destructive behaviours (Ross et al., 1999). Research postulates that stressors might, by threatening the individual and producing physiological arousal, have a direct negative effect on mental health (Taylor, 1991). ...
Article
Against the backdrop of the worldwide spread of COVID-19, this study aims to validate a model for coping with psychological distress and examine the effect of music listening, as a coping strategy, in moderating and lessening the effects of stressors on psychological distress. Based on 198 returned questionnaires from preservice kindergarten teachers, this study suggests students experienced such common mental health issues as stress, anxiety and depression due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Time pressures, general social mistreatment, academic alienation and developmental challenges were significant stressors predicting students’ anxiety. Music listening played a prominent moderating role on the relationship between stressors and psychological wellbeing mental health/psychological distress. However, music with lyrics with a positive meaning may lessen the moderating effect of musical elements. This study suggests that music listening has a prominent moderating effect on health/psychological distress, while the implicit or explicit musical meaning of the music perceived by the audience determines its moderating effect.
... College students have a unique cluster of stressful experiences (Garnett, 2001). Ross, Neibling and Heckert (1999) enumerated some reasons for increased stress levels in college learners. Such reasons include students have to make significant adjustment to college life and due to the pressure of studies, there is strain placed on interpersonal relationships. ...
... This might have occurred because female college students are less adaptable to the epidemic and bear higher pressure, so the severity of anxiety is higher. Engineering college students reported that their lack of sleep, intense competition, lifestyle changes, and other important stressors throughout their undergraduate education could further raise their stress and anxiety levels, which could be detrimental to their mental health (Ross et al., 1999). At present, there are researches about parental psychological control on children and adolescents (Shek et al., 2018;Shek and Dou, 2020), but few studies discuss whether parental psychological control will have different degrees of influence on college students. ...
Article
Full-text available
The issue of mental health among college students is of increasing concern during the COVID-19 outbreak. Since course characteristics of engineering college students determine the particularities of their mental health, the specific objectives of this study were: (1) to analyze the relationship between physical activity, parental psychological control, basic psychological needs, anxiety, and mental health in Chinese engineering college students during COVID-19 pandemic; and (2) to examine the mediation effect of anxiety between the relationship of basic psychological needs and mental health. A cross-sectional study was conducted among several universities in Shandong Province, China. We randomly selected 254 Chinese engineering college students from these colleges. Participants who were given questionnaires completed the Physical Activity Rating Scale (PARS-3), Basic Needs Satisfaction in General Scale (BNSG-S), Parental psychological control Questionnaire, the Beck anxiety inventory (BAI), and the Kessler 10 (K10) scale. The mediation model was conducted to assess the mediation effect of anxiety between the relationship of basic psychological needs and mental health. Among 254 Chinese college students majoring in engineering, the results showed that their mental health was in the mid-level range. Besides, physical activity and basic psychological needs is positively correlated with mental health, respectively, while parental psychological control is not correlated with mental health. Anxiety is negatively associated with mental health. Mediation analysis revealed that anxiety played a mediation role in the relationship between basic psychological needs and mental health. In conclusion, mental health of Chinese engineering college students deserves extensive attention during the COVID-19 pandemic. Proper intervention on physical activity, basic psychological needs, and anxiety may be beneficial to improve their mental health. In addition, meeting basic psychological needs is beneficial to reduce anxiety and improve mental health further.
... Üniversite öğrencilerindeki stres kaynakları16 akademik çalışmalar, kişisel durumlar, sosyal çevre, zaman ve ekonomik koşullar gibi durumlardır. Ayrıca stres, sadece üniversite yaşamı boyunca değil, öncesinde, lisans düzeyinden profesyonel düzeye geçiş sırasında ve sonrasında, iş hayatına geçiş sırasında da farklı zaman dilimlerinde 17 yaşanabilmektedir.Üniversite öğrencilerinde bruksizm ve stres arasındaki ilişki üzerine yapılan çalışmalarda geçiş süreci, bağlılık ve zorlu üniversite ortamı[18][19][20] gibi durumlar, öğrencilerin başa çıkması gereken durumlar haline gelebilir. Zorlandıklarında ise stresin olumsuz etkilerine açık hale gelirler.-Daha ...
... ej., cambio en las actividades sociales) y los ambientales (p. ej., problemas informáticos, pandemias, etc.) (Fawzy & Hamed, 2017;Hamaideh, 2011;Lai et al., 2020;Mall et al., 2018;Ross et al., 1999). La exposición a estos factores de estrés, junto con las lagunas en el desarrollo de la capacidad de afrontamiento de los estudiantes (Chung et al., 2017;Lowe & Cook, 2010), hacen que esta población sea especialmente vulnerable a los problemas de salud física y psicológica resultantes (Brimstone et al., 2007;Diehl et al., 1996;Pritchard et al., 2010). ...
Chapter
Full-text available
Yuste-Hidalgo, F., Rojas-Cepero, I., Chacón-Borrego, F. y Cepero-González, M. (2021). Intervención para la promoción de resiliencia en docentes y estudiantes universitarios: fundamentación y protocolo de estudio del Proyecto RESUPERES. En O. Buzón y C. Romero (Eds.). Metodologías activas con TIC en la educación del siglo XXI. (pp. 2615-2644). Dykinson S.L. Publicación en congreso. (ISBN: 978-84-1377-592-0)
... Stress is a normal response to these types of situations of distress (Horwitz, 2007;Wheatonb& Montazer,2010). Stress disturbs our sleeping and eating patterns (Lund et al.,2010;Pawlow& Malcolm, 2003;Nédélec, 2015), which leads to irritability or emotional outbursts (Mayes et al.,2015), low motivation (McClelland & Jemmott III, 1980), and change in habits (Ross et al., 1999), use of alcohol or other drugs (Breslau et al., 2003). It ultimately takes the form of social causes in a wider form.Therefore, concepts like emotional wellness which relates to "understanding one's feelings and coping effectively with stress"; financial wellness which involves "the process of learning how to successfully manage financesincomes and expenses"; occupational wellness which "is about enjoying one's occupational endeavors and appreciating one's own contributions thereto to family and society"; social wellness which helps "one perform one's social roles effectively and comfortably, and helps create a support network of friends and family" should be discussed, analyzed and communicated in the society to increase the overall well-being of society as a whole. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
Nowadays, when there are a lot of problems to solve and we are constantly caught up in daily tasks, it is more and more difficult to organize ourselves and make the ideal choices for our lives. We choose to smoke or not, to eat at fast food or not, to lead a sedentary or active life, etc. All these choices and behaviors can affect us to a greater or lesser extent our health. Free time is the biggest problem of modern people and the main reason why it does not move. However, the solution is relatively simple. If you can’t train at home, you can find at least one fitness gym in each neighborhood. So, the offer of gyms is generous, because the demand is starting to increase. Maintaining a permanent state of health is a difficult test that each of us must pass daily. Perhaps the most important aspect of this equation is responsibility. When we succeed to become aware about the responsibility for maintaining physical, mental and social well-being, as defined health by WHO, belongs to us and to no one else (family, doctors, teachers, coaches), then we can make the right choices for our lives. “Numerous studies have shown that a person’s life expectancy is directly influenced (positively) by seemingly commonplace aspects, such as maintaining a normal weight, quitting smoking, moderate or no alcohol consumption, sleep lasting 7 - 8 hours, diversified diet and rationally distributed, and last but not least, physical exercise practiced independently and regularly” (http://www.doctor.info.ro)
... Depressive symptoms are commonly experienced by first-year students (Mih ailescu et al., 2016). However, individuals are inherently different with varying degrees of stress in similar situations (Ross et al., 1999), leading to a discourse on what constitutes these internal capacities and strengths and how and why certain individuals have a natural capacity to recover and potentially further their adaptive ability (Masten et al., 2015;Reich et al., 2010). To understand how one adapts or responds amid challenges, Masten (2001) observed the fundamental role of resilience as a natural capacity of an individual to adapt to these challenges. ...
Article
Our review explores the effectiveness of resilience interventions on improving resilience, reducing depressive symptoms, and overcoming stress symptoms among higher education students. We conducted a systematic search in 10 electronic English and Chinese language databases. Twenty-nine randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Effect sizes from 25 RCTs were calculated for meta-analysis and metaregression. The results of a random effects model reveal that resilience interventions are effective in improving resilience with small effect size (g = .32, 95% CI [.15, .49]), reducing depressive symptoms with small effect size (g = .25, 95% CI [.06, 44]), and overcoming stress (g = .22, 95% CI [.08, .32]). Subgroup analyses conclude that effect sizes of resilience interventions comprising skills that enhance social competency are statistically significantly larger than those of interventions without. In addition, the effect sizes are larger when resilience interventions used synchronous communication and delivered through a mixture of didactic and dialectic approaches. Metaregression reveals that trials rated with low scores in the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument considerably influence scores in resilience. Our meta-analysis supports the use of resilience interventions as a universal prevention strategy among higher education students. This review ends with implications for practice and directions for further research on developing resilience interventions
... Stress is an unavoidable phenomenon in all aspects of human life. Stress is an emotional imbalance which may occur due to various reasons such as tests, papers and projects, competitive nature within one's chosen field, financial worries about school and future employment prospects (Ross et al., 1999). Stress can be negative or positive to an individual, depending on the strength and persistence of the stress, the individual's personality, cognitive appraisal of the stress, and social support. ...
Experiment Findings
Full-text available
Stress is a condition of mental pressure for particular individual facing problems from environmental and social well-being which leads to so many diseases. Young age is the critical period because at this time student faces lots of changes in his/her life. Students of the modern era are living in a highly competitive world which exerts lots of stress on students to survive in this era. Stress is an unavoidable phenomenon in all aspects of human life. Stress is an emotional imbalance which may occur due to various reasons such as tests, papers and projects, competitive nature within one's chosen field, financial worries about school and future employment prospects (Ross et al., 1999). Stress can be negative or positive to an individual, depending on the strength and persistence of the stress, the individual's personality, cognitive appraisal of the stress, and social support. Stress affects students academically, socially, physically and emotionally. The transition of students from high school level to the college level is inherently stressful for students. It could cause psychological, academic and social shock to them. From this perspective, this research was aimed to investigate the level of stress among the College students. Descriptive research was undertaken to assess the www.ijcrt.org © 2021 IJCRT | Volume 9, Issue 5 May 2021 | ISSN: 2320-2882 IJCRT2105883 International Journal of Creative Research Thoughts (IJCRT) www.ijcrt.org i296 students' level of stress. A randomly drawn participants (N = 30) completed Perceived Stress Scale assessing their levels of stress). The results revealed that there was a moderate level of stress among the students. Besides, the students' levels of stress were found to have no statistically significant associations with their gender. The study may theoretically contribute to the body of scientific knowledge on mental health studies. Practically, the study may also guide college communities to take concrete steps towards the improvement of the learning environment and subsequently mitigating the adverse impact of stress on students' wellbeing and learning outcomes.
... In addition, our research found that participants in higher year levels were more likely to smoke or vape, which is consistent and in agreement with other studies that describe smoking as a coping strategy among college students (Naquin and Gilbert 1996;Sun et al. 2011b). Moreover, the higher year levels in college induce more stress among the students due to the increasing demands in the university and the pressure to graduate (Ross et al. 1999). Further studies examining the relationship between stress levels and year level in college may merit our initial findings. ...
Article
Full-text available
Nursing students trained to be health advocates have engaged in cigarette and electronic cigarette (EC) use. Our study aimed to determine the prevalence of cigarette and EC use among nursing students and examine how EC vaping and cigarette smoking are associated with various risk factors. This cross-sectional survey of smoking and vaping was administered to 249 nursing students in a private university in Manila, Philippines. An online-based self-assessment questionnaire (SAQ) that includes socio-demographic information, cigarette and EC usage, Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and other risk factors was administered using on-campus and online recruitment strategies. Generalized linear models were fitted to estimate the effect of stress and other risk factors on smoking and vaping. Approximately one out of eight were exclusive vapers, one out of 25 were exclusive smokers, and one out of five were both smokers 412 and vapers. The prevalence of smoking/vaping was 47% higher [adjusted prevalence ratio (aPR): 1.47, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.04-2.07, p-value = 0.028] among students with high-stress levels than students with low to moderate stress levels. In addition, students who were sophomores (aPR: 1.69, 95% CI: 1.12-2.53, p-value = 0.012), juniors (aPR: 3.22, 95% CI: 1.91-5.42, p-value < 0.001), and seniors (aPR: 1.53, 95% CI: 0.76-3.08, p-value = 0.230) had a higher prevalence of smoking/vaping compared to freshmen students. Having a positive attitude towards vaping health impacts and a smoker/vaper peer was also associated with a higher prevalence of smoking/vaping. Therefore, effective health communication strategies and policies in universities and the community are recommended to reinforce existing smoking and vaping control efforts.
... There are also concerns that long-term school suspensions, house arrest, and distance learning may have negative effects on the physical and mental health for college students [11]. Moreover, emerging issues during the COVID-19 pandemic, such as clashing family schedules, alterations in eating and sleeping habits, and disconnection from classmates could also negatively affect college students [12]. ...
Article
Full-text available
The emergence of the COVID-19 has greatly affected the world and caused many unprecedented changes in our lives. For many, it has generated a significant amount of stress, anxiety, worries about health, social isolation, unemployment as well as financial problems. Just like the rest, the pandemic has really taken a toll on students' well-being all around the world. They have a lot on their plates, especially dealing with academic strains, remoteness from school and fear of infection during this time of crisis. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was conducted to explore how and if these three stressors have an impact on the medical students' stress and health during the pandemic. The analysis included mean, frequency, correlation, unpaired T-test & ANOVA. Out of 159 students, we have found that Hindu religion has a higher stress level (mean =24.4). Female gender (mean = 25.6) and those who have underlying mental health issues (mean=30.3) have a higher physical and psychological impairment. There is a positive significant association between academic strain (r= 0.245, p=0.001), remoteness from school (r=0.223, p=0.003) with perceived stress. There is also a positive significant correlation between academic strain (r=0.283, p=0.000), remoteness from school (r=0.387, p=0.000), perceived stress (r=0.583, p=0.000) with impairment of physical and psychological health. Thus, with this information we can conclude that we have found that there is a positive significant association between academic strain, remoteness from school with perceived stress, physical and psychological health.
... given the elevated baseline level of distress in this group and the impact of pandemic-related academic stressors (Pryjmachuk & Richards, 2007), interpersonal stressors (Ross, Niebling, & Heckert, 1999), and concern about employment prospects (Stixrud, 2012). Although young people found themselves largely spared the worst health consequences of COVID-19 (Hedrich 2020), this widespread outbreak led to social distancing measures (e.g., the transition of many universities to an online/remote format) and concerns about the economic climate into which students would be graduating. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background The COVID-19 pandemic has led to psychological distress among community samples and university students (Cao et al., 2020; Wang et al., 2020). Some coping behaviors and cognitive appraisals allow individuals to experience positive psychological growth amid such a crisis (Folkman et al. 1986). In the event of continuing waves of COVID-19 infection and future viral outbreaks, understanding the relationships between coping behaviors, stress appraisals, and COVID-related distress and growth can empower public health officials and university leadership to mitigate negative consequences and encourage growth. Methods 774 undergraduate students completed online self-report measures of coping (Brief COPE; emotion, problem, avoidant), stress appraisal (SAM; threat/centrality, challenge/self-efficacy, uncontrol, other-control), neuroticism (NEO-N), health anxiety (SHAI), and COVID-19 exposure/impact (C-PIQ; distress and growth). Hypotheses were examined via simpleregressions and interactions. Results Increased utilization of avoidant coping was associated with high levels of distress regardless of whether it was perceived as threatening or not. Emotion-focused and problem-focused coping strategies were associated with more growth, whereas avoidant coping was associated with less growth. Higher emotion-focused coping and challenge appraisal together predicted the most growth. Limitations Cross-sectional design precludes the tracking of distress and growth over time; this study relied on self-report data. Conclusions These results underscore the impact of stress appraisals on the mental health of students navigating the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings may inform public health messaging–or have clinical implications, as successful interventions exist for improving coping strategies and stress appraisals.
Article
Full-text available
Pretende-se partilhar os resultados do estudo feito na rea da avalia o da sintomatologia psicol gica que podem contribuir para reflectir sobre a inclus o do desporto numa configura o de ajuda na vida de um ser humano em sofrimento psicol gico. Est provado que o Desporto faz bem sa de f sica, mas h um longo caminho a percorrer para provar que o desporto faz bem sa de mental. Ser que os sujeitos que praticam desporto t m menos indicadores de sintomatologia psicol gica do que os sujeitos que n o praticam desporto? O estudo encontrou pouca sintomatologia psicol gica no grupo de estudantes de EFD (Educa o F sica e Desporto). Avaliou-se os ndices de solid o e tamb m n o apresentam n veis clinicamente significativos. Os resultados mostram que quem est ligado ao desporto, de certa forma parece ter poucos ind cios de mal-estar psicol gico e poucos n veis de solid o.
Chapter
Residential halls are an important component of college education, benefiting holistic personal development, as documented by previous research (Kuh et al in What matters to student success: A review of the literature [Commissioned report for the National Symposium on Postsecondary Student Success]. National Postsecondary Education Cooperative, 2006; Pascarella et al in Foreword. Schroeder and Mable (eds) Realizing the educational potential of residence halls, Jossey-Bass, 1994). While previous research has tended to focus on Western universities, the current research aims to improve Hong Kong university students’ residential hall experiences by providing a comprehensive analysis of the impact of hall experiences on students’ academic, social, and independent developmental domains. Comparing students living in residential halls with those who are not residents, it was predicted that students living in halls would outperform their non-hall counterparts in most aspects of development. A total of 1,904 participants from four universities in Hong Kong were recruited to participate in a self-assessed questionnaire tapping into various aspects of students’ development. Contrary to the predictions, the results revealed that students living in halls significantly outranked non-hall residents in five aspects of development: peer-group interactions and communication skills (p = .012), self-efficacy (p = .019), problem-solving skills (p = .012), self-control (p = .001), and open-mindedness (p < .001). These results imply that there is still much to be done to improve students’ residential hall experiences to facilitate students’ personal development.
Article
Literature reviews are often used as part of teaching undergraduates about secondary research. The assignment, however, presents challenges for inexperienced researchers and writers and can be difficult for instructors to read and grade. This “quick fix” piece offers an alternative assignment to begin students in gaining secondary research gathering and synthesis skills.
Article
The aim of this research is to find out the academic stresses of psychology study program students who are programming thesis courses, faculty of psychology and education at Muhammadiyah University of Sidoarjo. The method in this study uses a descriptive quantitative approach which aims to determine the intensity of academic stress on psychology students who are programming thesis courses. The research subjects were 123 out of 200 students who processed thesis courses in 2017-2018. The sample was taken using simple random sampling. The data were collected using the academic stress scale compiled by the researcher. The results of this study illustrate that the results of the intensity of student academic stress are dominated in the moderate to quite high category, namely 67%. The results of this study also illustrate that the aspects of academic stress in psychology study program students are more dominant in the physical and emotional aspects. On the physical aspect, you get 34%, on the emotional aspect you get 29% on the intellectual aspect you get 21% and on the intrapersonal aspect you get 16%.
Article
Full-text available
Abstract: For this study, we used a convenience sample of students from Minot State University in Minot, North Dakota, to see if student athletes have more self-reported stress than non-athletes. "Student -Life Stress Inventory: Identification of and Reactions to Stressors," by Gadzella (1991), was the source of our survey of which 43 athletes and 45 non-athletes participated in the survey, citing academic, environmental, intrapersonal, and interpersonal stressors. We compared six different tests: male athlete versus female athlete, male nonathlete versus female nonathlete, athletes versus nonathletes, male athletes versus male nonathletes, female athletes versus female nonathletes, those with a job versus those without a job, and those with above a 3.0 GPA versus those under a 3.0 GPA. In every category except academics, women were more stressed. Males, on the other hand, were more stressed in the academic aspect. Four of the seven were deemed to be inconsequential academically, whereas the other three were noteworthy. Male athletes are more stressed than female athletes, male nonathletes are more stressed than female nonathletes, and employed students are less worried than those who are jobless, according to the three academically relevant assessments. Keywords: Stress, Sources of Stress, Self-reported Stress, Student-life Stress Inventory, University Athletes, Non-Athletes. Journal: Journal of Business Management, Commerce & Research, Volume IX, Issue 7, March 2022, pp. 1 – 13, e-ISSN 2319-250X. (With Andy Bertsch, Adesuwa Erude, James Ondracek, Kellie Piazza, Gabby Kwiatek, Chloe Melton, Domenic Selmi, Cole Lower, and Joe Freeman)
Article
Against the backdrop of the worldwide spread of COVID-19, this study aims to validate a model for coping with psychological distress and examine the effect of music listening, as a coping strategy, in moderating and lessening the effects of stressors on psychological distress. Based on 198 returned questionnaires from preservice kindergarten teachers, this study suggests students experienced such common mental health issues as stress, anxiety and depression due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Time pressures, general social mistreatment, academic alienation and developmental challenges were significant stressors predicting students’ anxiety. Music listening played a prominent moderating role on the relationship between stressors and psychological wellbeing mental health/psychological distress. However, music with lyrics with a positive meaning may lessen the moderating effect of musical elements. This study suggests that music listening has a prominent moderating effect on health/psychological distress, while the implicit or explicit musical meaning of the music perceived by the audience determines its moderating effect.
Article
Full-text available
We share the results of a study done in the area of assessment of psychological symptoms which will hopefully help to reflect about the inclusion of sport in a setting aid in the life of a human being with psychological distress. It is proved that sport is good for physical health, but there is a long way to go to prove that sport is good for your mental health. Do the guys who play sports have less indicators of psychological symptoms than subjects who do not practice sport? The study found little psychological symptoms in the group of students from PES (Physical Education and Sport). We evaluated the levels of loneliness in this group of students and did not show clinically significant levels. The results show that those who are connected to sports, somehow seems to have little evidence of psychological discomfort and few levels of loneliness.
Article
Full-text available
Students in Islamic higher education institution are part of the next Muslim generation. They will have significant role to build the nation and ummah in the future. To be able to improve the quality and well-being of Muslim future generation, it is imperative to explore the character strength of Muslim University students. This research aims to inquire the student's character strength in a private Islamic University in Jakarta. Quantitative approach is applied to explore the indicators of character strength among the research subjects. The data was collected with a questionnaire based on adaptation of Values in Action Inventory of Strengths (VIA-IS) scale. The data was obtained from 315 students from several faculties in a private Islamic University in Jakarta. The result suggests that out of 24 characters, 5 characters are quite dominant among the research subjects. These characters are gratitude, love of learning, kindness, citizenship, and bravery. Discussion, limitations, and suggestions are explained in the end of the paper.
Article
Özet Bilinçli farkındalık, en temel seviyede, kişinin yaşadığı anı ve o anda etrafında gerçekleşenleri oldukları gibi yargılamadan fark etmesi anlamına geliyor. Böylesi bir ruh hâli, mevcut ânâ ve bakış açısına daha açık olmamıza yardımcı olur ve karşılığında, yaşamlarımızı daha iyi kontrol etmemize izin verir. Tedbirli olduğumuzda, etrafımızda olup bitenlere karşı tetikte oluruz ve başkalarına cevap vermeye daha açık oluruz. Sonuç olarak, bilinçli farkındalık, daha konsantre olmaya, daha az zorlamaya, daha sağlıklı iletişim kurmaya ve sonunda üstün bir genel esenliğe yardımcı olur. Ancak bu felsefeyi ve ona âit uygulamaları belirli bir inanç sistemine veya dine bağlamamaya özen gösterilmelidir. Bu makale; bilinçli farkındalık nedir ve neden bilinçli farkında olmalıyız, bilinçli farkındalık ve din, bilinçli farkındalık, öğretmenler ve eğitim, bilinçli farkındalık ve kültürlerarası İletişim, bilinçli farkındalık, öğretmenlik mesleği ve stres gibi alt konularını kapsayan bilinçli farkındalık hakkında bilgi vermeyi amaçlamaktadır. Makale aynı zamanda, 42 son sınıf İngiliz Dili ve Eğitimi bölümü öğrencisi (27 kadın, 15 erkek) üzerinde uygulanan ve onların çeşitli görevler sırasında bilinçli dikkat ve farkındalıklarını veya yeterince dikkat etmeden otomatik olarak hareket etmelerini tespit etmeye yarayan, Bilinçli Farkındalık Dikkati Ölçeği'nin (MAAS) sonuçlarını paylaşmaktadır. Abstract Mindfulness, at its most basic level, means noticing the moment and what is happening around oneself as they are, without judging them. Such a mood helps us be more open to the present moment and perspective, and in turn allows us to better control our lives. When we are vigilant, we are alert to what is going on around us and are more open to responding to others. As a result, mindfulness helps to concentrate more, strain less, communicate healthier, and ultimately results in a superior general well-being. However, care should be taken not to tie this philosophy and its practices to a particular belief system or religion. This article aims to provide information about mindfulness and some sub-topics such as what mindfulness is and why we should be mindful, mindfulness and religion, mindfulness, teachers and education, mindfulness and intercultural communication, and mindfulness, teaching profession and stress. The article also shares the results of MAAS (The Mindful Attention Awareness Scale) applied to 42 senior English Language and Education department students (27 women, 15 men) which is used to assess participants’ awareness of moment-to-moment presence during several tasks or, in contrast, behave on automatically without paying enough attention to them.
Article
Full-text available
Nearly all students experience stress as they pursue important academic goals. Because stress can be magnified for students from disadvantaged backgrounds, it becomes important to identify interventions that can help mitigate this stress, particularly for these populations as they enter academic environments. We examine the effects of stress mindset and stress management interventions administered to students from disadvantaged backgrounds (N = 140) before freshman year. We compare effects on affect, sleep, and performance during end-of-year exams seen in a subset of these students who could be tracked via experience sampling (N = 57) to those of a comparison group at the same elite university (N = 74) receiving no such stress interventions. As predicted, we find significant differences in exam-week positive affect between the stress mindset and comparison groups. However, there was no difference in positive affect between the stress mindset and management groups or the stress management and comparison groups. For negative affect, stress, sleep, and exam performance, we find no significant differences between any of the three groups. However, both stress interventions decoupled the significant negative association between exam-week stress and exam performance exhibited by the comparison group, rendering the relationship nonsignificant. The reduction in this association was somewhat more pronounced for the mindset relative to the management group. These findings suggest that mindset and management approaches both confer benefits in certain circumstances and highlight the potential value of targeting mindsets about stress using a "wise intervention" approach for students from disadvantaged backgrounds during stressful times. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).
Article
Full-text available
College students commonly experience psychological distress when faced with intensified academic demands and changes in the social environment. Examining the nature and dynamics of students’ affective and behavioral experiences can help us better characterize the correlates of psychological distress. Here, we leveraged wearables and smartphones to study 49 first-year college students continuously throughout the academic year. Affect and sleep, academic, and social behavior showed substantial changes from school semesters to school breaks and from weekdays to weekends. Three student clusters were identified with behavioral and affective dissociations and varying levels of distress throughout the year. While academics were a common stressor for all, the cluster with highest distress stood out by frequent report of social stress. Moreover, the frequency of reporting social, but not academic, stress predicted subsequent clinical symptoms. Two years later, during the COVID-19 pandemic, the first-year cluster with highest distress again stood out by frequent social stress and elevated clinical symptoms. Focus on sustained interpersonal stress, relative to academic stress, might be especially helpful to identify students at heightened risk for psychopathology.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Abstrak Pendidikan karakter adalah usaha-usaha yang melibatkan pengetahuan, perasaan dan tindakan, serta dilakukan untuk membangun suatu karakter pada individu. Pendidikan karakter penting untuk diberikan kepada pendamping asrama karena para pendamping juga harus memiliki karakter tersebut terlebih dahulu sebelum membentuk karakter siswanya. Subjek penelitian adalah para pendamping asrama, yang merupakan mahasiswa perguruan tinggi. Oleh karena itu subjek rentan mengalami stres akibat dua tuntutan tugas yakni tugas sebagai mahasiswa sekaligus sebagai pendamping asrama. Pendidikan karakter yang diberikan diharapkan mampu mengurangi stres pada pendamping asrama. Efektivitas pendidikan karakter diketahui melalui Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) yang diberikan kepada 21 subjek pendamping asrama sebelum dan setelah pelatihan. Teknik pengambilan sampel menggunakan non-probability sampling yang memakai seluruh populasi menjadi sampel. Subjek berusia 19-25 tahun berjenis kelamin perempuan serta berprofesi sebagai mahasiswa sekaligus pendamping asrama. Analisis data menggunakan uji beda paired sample t-test untuk mengetahui perbedaan skor stres antara sebelum dan setelah pelatihan. Hasil analisis data menunjukan p=0,0001 (p < 0,001). Hampir seluruh pendamping asrama menunjukan penurunan skor stres setelah mengikuti pendidikan karakter. Berdasarkan hasil tersebut maka dapat disimpulkan pendidikan karakter mampu mengurangi stres pada pendamping mahasiswa.. Kata Kunci: pendidikan karakter, stres
Article
Human psychological stress involves a state of emotional strain resulting from a demanding circumstance. The objective of this study is to critically examine the factors causing the stress among the international students studying in South Texas University. In this study, 67 surveys were administered to international undergraduate and graduate students at South Texas University. According to the results, 97% of the international students are experiencing many of the types of stress found in the literature reviewed for this project. The results of the present study also indicated that environmental and cultural change also has a great impact on their emotional stability. The school faculty members have an important role to play in accommodating the international students and giving proper orientation on how to live a stress free academic life. Stress reduction will eventually have a positive impact on academic performance of international college students.
Article
Full-text available
Human psychological stress involves a state of emotional strain resulting from a demanding circumstance. The objective of this study is to critically examine the factors causing the stress among the international students studying in South Texas University. In this study, 67 surveys were administered to international undergraduate and graduate students at South Texas University. According to the results, 97% of the international students are experiencing many of the types of stress found in the literature reviewed for this project. The results of the present study also indicated that environmental and cultural change also has a great impact on their emotional stability. The school faculty members have an important role to play in accommodating the international students and giving proper orientation on how to live a stress free academic life. Stress reduction will eventually have a positive impact on academic performance of international college students.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.