Article

Transoceanic Trash: International and United States Strategies For the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

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Abstract

Part II of this Comment provides an overview of the debris found in the Patch and the associated health impacts. Part III reviews the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Waste and Other Matters (the London Convention) with its corresponding international and U.S. laws, and then separately examines the U.S. Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act (MDRPRA). Part IV argues that the laws identified in Part III can be applied to provide a means to clean up the portion of the Patch affecting U.S. territory. Part V briefly surveys the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (Kyoto Protocol) and the U.S. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) to provide an understanding of the proposed structure and mechanisms that can be used to create a new international treaty. Part VI details a proposed hybrid cleanup model of international law, using CERCLA and the Kyoto Protocol.

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... 17 The patch, which is actually the combination of two accumulation zones in the Pacific, the Western Garbage Patch and the Eastern Garbage Patch, is an "international dump site." 18 It collects garbage from all over the world. Despite its name, however, it is not a heaping pile of trash that is readily visible. ...
... However, the Patch affects a marine sanctuary that is incorporated within Title III of the US Ocean Dumping Act. Title III "calls for the protection and maintenance of natural biological communities" (Dautel, 2009). The US Ocean Dumping Act concentrates on the municipal and industrial waste entering waterways that lead to the ocean. ...
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Chapter
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