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Optimal inflow control of production systems with finite buffers

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Abstract

We introduce the optimal in ow control problem for bufler restricted production systems involving a conservation law with discontinuous flux. Based on an appropriate numerical method inspired by the wave front tracking algorithm, we present two techniques to solve the optimal control problem effciently. A numerical study compares the different optimization procedures and comments on their benefits and drawbacks.

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... We prove herein a new property for the approximate solution (11) . Let us consider the generic ODE ...
... By recalling (11) , the approximate solution over the single subinterval for (3) can be written as (omitting subscript): ...
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