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AASCUs Global Challenges 'Promise and Peril in the 21st Century' Course

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In 2006, the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) launched its Global Engagement Initiative and began developing a set of curricular tools for faculty to use in educating globally competent citizens. A national blended-model course was developed in 2011 and has now been delivered to more than 1,200 students on 15 campuses across the country and abroad. The blended-model course is the first in what AASCU hopes will be a series of National Blended Course Consortium (NBCC) courses. In this article, the authors share the AASCU NBCC model for the Global Challenges curriculum and offer case studies on how that curriculum has been successfully delivered on two campuses. Keywords: global engagement, AASCU, global citizenship, first year, general education
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Developing a global learning rubric: Strengthening teaching and improving learning
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Anderson, C., & Blair, D. (2013). Developing a global learning rubric: Strengthening teaching and improving learning. Diversity & Democracy, 16(3).