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NB: This is the first edition. Second edition available from Springer November 2019. Implementing Mental Health Promotion provides a comprehensive overview and practical guide to implementing mental health promotion programmes with different population groups across a range of settings. It shows how information from research can be used to inform programme development and best practice. The text is written from a 'how-to' perspective, combining an exploration of current research with practical advice to support the planning and implementation of programmes. The book provides examples of successful international programmes illustrating the process of implementation. Case studies of practical aspects of project development and delivery from different countries are included in order to illustrate the real life application of programmes.
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... Positive mental health also leads to greater productivity, improved employment and earnings, enhanced relationships, enhanced social cohesion and engagement, and improved quality of life (Friedli 2009). Barry and Jenkins (2007) stated that 'the determinants of mental health reside in the physical and psychological make-up of the individual, their interpersonal and social surroundings and the external environmental and broader social influences'. They emphasised the importance of establishing emotional resilience in individuals to manage stress. ...
... Several protective factors for positive mental health have been identified, including hardiness, self-esteem, social support, optimism and positive affect (Steinhardt and Dolbier 2008). Barry and Jenkins (2007) advocated focusing on interventions that promote psychological strengths and competence. According to Fredrickson (2009), the way to achieve happiness is to cultivate positivity, and to develop resilience in the face of negativity and adversity. ...
... In line with the theories of mental health promotion (Barry & Jenkins, 2007;Jané-Llopis, Barry, Hosman, & Patel, 2005) and the principles of effective practice in promoting mental health in the youth setting (Kobus-Matthews, Jackson, Easlick., & Loconte, 2014), the students clearly appreciated a more positive focus on mental health and well-being. The students' views that reading about depression and negative thinking patterns is "boring" or even "depressing" present a challenge to the use of current evidence-based programs in terms of how to address mental health issues and engage young people in a meaningful manner without focusing unduly on the negative aspects of mental health. ...
... The staff account of the challenges faced by students indicates that the underlying nature of emotional problems among students varies from specific mental health problems such as depression and anxiety, to poor self-esteem linked to negative experiences in mainstream education, to coping with social and economic issues. Thus, an approach that focuses on building cognitive, social, and emotional skills which have universal relevance to all youth (Barry & Jenkins, 2007) may not only be more acceptable to the students but also more appropriate when targeting all students in an educational setting. Interventions that focus on protective factors for resilience and coping with challenges enhance good mental health and psychological well-being, but also reduce risk factors for mental health problems and negative life outcomes (Clarke, Morreale, Field, Hussein, & Barry, 2015). ...
Article
Methods: Student and staff needs were assessed using the Requirements development approach (Van Velsen, Wentzel, & Van Gemert-Pijnen, 2013). An online staff survey (n = 16) was conducted to provide information on the context of delivery, and stakeholder requirements were further explored in four student workshops (n = 32) and staff group discussions (n = 12). Results: Students' requirements in relation to program look and feel were reflective of issues with literacy and concentration. Activity- rather than text-based programs were considered easier to learn from, whereas attractive design with features such as connecting with others were thought necessary to keep young people engaged. Students wanted to learn practical skills on improving their mental health and well-being, using content that is positive, encouraging, and credible and that can be tailored to individual needs. Anonymity and voluntary participation were considered essential when delivering cCBT in the context of alternative education, as well as additional access from home to ensure timeliness of support. Staff required both flexibility and careful planning and timetabling in order to deliver cCBT in the alternative education setting and to support student engagement. Conclusion: The findings provide novel insight into the needs and preferences of vulnerable youth, with important implications for the implementation of computerized mental health programs in alternative education settings. A better understanding of user needs and preferences is critical for improving the uptake and impact of e-mental health resources. Limited full text copies can be accessed at no charge via this link: http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/GNnyh8JTtbvVBik85bG6/full
... The field of positive psychology has expanded traditional psychology by including and examining topics such as strengths, growth and well-being [17]. The promotion of wellbeing is now widely recognized as a new goal in mental health care to complement the traditional focus on preventing and treating problems [2,18,19]. Improved well-being has positive effects on health and personal functioning, resulting in health gains at both the individual and societal level [20]. ...
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Background: Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the positive psychology intervention 'Happiness Route' compared to an active control condition in a vulnerable population with an accumulation of health and psychosocial problems. Methods: We conducted a randomized, single-blind, actively-controlled, parallel group study in seven municipalities in the Netherlands. To be eligible, participants had to experience loneliness, health problems and low socio-economic status. Each group received several home visits by a counsellor (two in the control condition, two to six in the experimental condition). In the Happiness Route, a happiness-based approach was used, whereas the control condition used a traditional problem-based approach. The primary outcome was well-being, measured with the Mental Health Continuum-Short Form (MHC-SF). Results: Fifty-eight participants were randomized to the Happiness Route, 50 to the control condition. Participants were severely lonely, had on average three health problems and less than 5% had paid work. The total MHC-SF score, emotional and social well-being, depression and loneliness improved significantly over the nine-month period in both conditions (p < .05), but there were no significant changes between the conditions across time. Languishing decreased significantly from 33% at baseline to 16% at follow-up among the Happiness Route participants but did not change significantly in the control condition. No significant improvement over time was found in psychological well-being, resilience, purpose in life, health-related quality of life and social participation. Cost-effectiveness analysis showed that expected saved costs per QALY lost was €219,948 for the Happiness Route, relative to the control condition. The probability was 83% that the Happiness Route was cost saving and 54% that the Happiness Route was cost-effective at a willingness to accept a threshold of €100,000. Conclusions: Mental health status of both groups improved considerably. However, we could not demonstrate that the Happiness Route yielded better health outcomes compared to the control condition. Nevertheless, the results of the cost-effectiveness analysis suggested that the Happiness Route is an acceptable intervention from a health-economic point of view. Our results should be viewed in light of the fact that we could not include the planned number of participants. Trial registration: Netherlands Trial Register: NTR3377. Registered 2 Apr 2012.
... Cette dynamique d'innovation sociale reflète l'émergence de nouveaux contextes de promotion de la santé mentale (Barry et Jenkins, 2006). Elle implique la mise en place d'un double processus de médiation innovante (avec des caractéristiques de médiation sociale et de médiation technologique) basée sur la création de passerelles entre deux groupes sociaux (la personne souffrante et la société en général) qui favorisent une rencontre Cette démarche se fonde sur une vision interdisciplinaire (Droit, Infocom et Psychologie) de la notion de santé mentale et de la personne et sur une philosophie de réinscription sociale d'une minorité discriminée (avec une déconstruction des murs sociopolitiques d'isolement et d'exclusion physique et/ou symbolique). ...
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Maître de conférences en sciences de l'information et de la communication, Université Toulouse 1 Capitole, IDETCOM (EA 785) Les concepts ne surgissent pas de l'expérience humaine, sinon ils seraient bien faits. Les premières dénominations sont faites à partir des mots, ce sont des instruments pour délinéer les choses. Ainsi toute science reste longtemps dans la nuit, empê-trée dans le langage. (Lacan, Leçon 1, 18 novembre 1953, p. 3) R epenser au sens large et strict la communication et l'utilisation des médias de communication en tant qu'« objets scientifiques » (Davallon, 2004) caractérise ma démarche. Comme « le savoir est un fantasme qui n'est fait que pour la jouissance » (Lacan, 1984, p. 14), le but est ici pour moi simplement de présenter une idée nouvelle, mais pas tellement, une pensée, celle de « communication pour le changement social ». Pour essayer d'éviter (dans le sens de réduire) de tomber dans la « jouissance du blabla » (Lacan, 1975, p. 53) et pour me soustraire à une position narcis-sique souvent de toute-puissance (caractéristique éprouvée par certains de mes confrères enseignants-chercheurs), je tiens à préciser que cette présen-tation est le résultat d'un long, quoiqu'insuffisant, processus d'une réflexion non linéaire, dynamique et inachevée (Tilli, 2015). Sa particularité est d'être (avant même qu'elle soit rédigée) imparfaite et difficilement aboutie du fait
... It involves feeling good emotionally and doing well in everyday functioning (Merikangas et al., 2010).The terms mental illness and mental disorders are commonly used to refer to diagnosable psychiatric conditions that significantly interfere with a person's functioning, such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and dementia. The term mental health challenges often refer to milder forms of mental illness, such as anxiety and depression, which may be less severe and of shorter duration but, if left unattended, may develop into more serious conditions (Barry & Jenkins, 2007). ...
Chapter
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This chapter provides information to prepare occupational therapy practitioners to meet the traditional demands associated with school-based practice and the knowledge to expand their scope in this dynamic environment.
... The development and sustainability of mental health promotion initiatives depend on having a skilled and informed workforce with the necessary competencies (Barry & Jenkins 2007). ...
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Mental health promotion remains an important component of mental health nursing practice. Supporting wellness at both the individual and societal levels has been identified as one of the key tenets of mental health promotion. However, the prevailing biomedical paradigm of mental health education and practice has meant that many nurses have not been equipped to incorporate a wellness perspective into their mental health practice. In the present study, we report on an exploratory study which details the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required by master-level mental health nurses to practice within a wellness paradigm from the perspective of three groups of key stakeholders: (i) service users and family members (n = 23); (ii) experienced mental health nurses (n = 49); and (iii) master-level mental health nursing students (n = 37). The findings, which were reported from individual and focus group interviews across five European countries, suggested a need to reorientate mental health nursing education to include a focus on wellness and resilience to equip mental health nurses with the skills to work within a strengths-based, rather than a deficits-based, model of mental health practice. Key challenges to working within a wellness paradigm were identified as the prevailing dominance of the biomedical model of cause and treatment of mental health problems, which focusses on symptoms, rather than the holistic functioning of the individual, and positions the person as passive in the nurse–service user relationship.
... Another key determinant of the success appears to be effective implementation (Barry and Jenkins, 2007;Rowling and Samdal, 2011). Many studies show that complete and accurate implementation leads to more positive outcomes, suggesting that fidelity to programmes is important. ...
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to scrutinise two ostensibly disparate approaches to school-based mental health promotion and offer a conceptual foundation for considering possible synergies between them. Design/methodology/approach The paper examines current conceptualisations of child and youth mental health and explores how these inform school-based prevention and intervention approaches. The dominance of discrete, “expert-driven” psychosocial programmes as well as the potential of critical pedagogy is explored using frameworks provided by contemporary dynamic systems theories. These theories call for a situated and holistic understanding of children’s development; and they look beyond static characteristics within individuals, to view well-being in relation to the dynamic social and historical contexts in which children develop. Findings Psychosocial interventions and critical pedagogies have strengths but also a number of limitations. Traditional psychosocial interventions teach important skill sets, but they take little account of children’s dynamic socio-cultural contexts, nor acknowledge the broader inequalities that are frequently a root cause of children’s distress. Critical pedagogies, in turn, are committed to social justice goals, but these goals can be elusive or seem unworkable in practice. By bringing these seemingly disparate approaches into conversation, it may be possible to harness their respective strengths, in ways that are faithful to the complex, emergent nature of children’s development, as well as committed to correcting inequalities. Originality/value The current paper is unique in bringing together contemporary psychological theory with critical pedagogy perspectives to explore the future of school-based mental health promotion.
Article
Anger and aggressive behaviour are part of everyday school-life and have been reported to be negatively associated with student well-being and academic performance. School-based interventions, developed to target anger and aggressive behaviour, are scarce. One such Danish intervention, the so-called Mini-Diamond, has been developed and implemented in several Danish municipalities. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the potential effects of the Mini-Diamond on student well-being in a controlled trial. Outcome measures included aspects of child- and parent-rated student well-being, including school connectedness, learning self-efficacy, and bullying. All children in grades 0–2 in Rødovre (intervention) and Herlev (control) municipalities participated and filled out the same questionnaires. No effects of the Mini-Diamond intervention were found on any of the outcomes. Potential reasons for this are discussed, including the possibility that there is no effect of the Mini-Diamond intervention on well-being, together with limitations and implications of the current study.
Article
Background: Public policy across the world is increasingly focusing on the role of mental health promotion in whole of health strategies. There is a growing evidence-base that mental health promotion, delivered by trained facilitators, is effective in promoting self-awareness and self-care to prevent the damaging effects of ongoing stress in one’s life and to promote early detection of any possible emerging mental health problems. Within Australia, however, few clinicians or school staff are confident or trained in mental health promotion. Aims: This paper reports the results of a two-day professional development experience designed for prospective facilitators of a mental health program for secondary-school students. The goal was to develop facilitators’ knowledge and understanding of best practice in youth mental health promotion and to increase their confidence in delivering the program. Design: A mixed methods evaluation was designed to assess the impact that a solution-focused training program had on participating facilitators. Methods: A questionnaire was created for the study and included eight quantitative items and one open ended, qualitative question. Twenty-seven nurses and guidance officers from central Queensland were recruited via convenience sampling and data were analysed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Results: The evaluation revealed that participants’ perception of their ability to facilitate a youth mental health program significantly improved after completing the professional development. Qualitative data indicated that participants found the professional development experience to be valuable, provide useful and transferable skills, and believed it to be necessary for mental health promotion work. Conclusion: By providing detailed description of the program’s content and processes, other mental health professionals may be inspired to further develop engaging and effective learning experiences.
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