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Nursing Students’ Satisfaction with Their Clinical Placement

Authors:

Abstract

Introduction: Exposure to positive clinical learning experience influences the nursing students' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and interest in continuing the nursing profession. It is widely acknowledged that clinical placement evaluations while students are on placement is very useful for better understanding of what constitutes quality clinical education from the students' perspective to provide better educational experiences. Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the nursing students' satisfaction with their clinical placement experiences and the degree to which their experiences are regarded as positive. Methodology: A descriptive design was used for the purpose of the study at college of Nursing in the eastern region of Saudi Arabia. Students enrolled in clinical courses during 2010-2012 were included. Clinical placement evaluation form was used for data collection and students were asked to respond to three open ended questions asking them for the advantages and the disadvantages of each clinical placement and their suggestions for improvement. Results: The majority of the students (75.6%) agreed or strongly agreed with statements rating their satisfaction with the clinical placement. However, students were dissatisfied with short clinical exposures, staff nurses role and evaluation process from the clinical instructors. Conclusion: Nursing students were found to be satisfied with their clinical placement but they highlighted negative areas that could be taken into consideration by the faculty members, clinical instructor, clinical staff as well as students to enhance the learning that takes place in the clinical setting.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
*Corresponding author: Email: amelmoataz@hotmail.com;
Journal of Scientific Research & Reports
4(6): 490-500, 2015; Article no.JSRR.2015.052
ISSN: 2320–0227
SCIENCEDOMAIN international
www.sciencedomain.org
Nursing Students’ Satisfaction with Their Clinical
Placement
Amel Abouelfettoh
1,2*
and Sukainah Al Mumtin
1
1
College of Nursing, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, P.O. Box2477,
Al Ahsa, 21983, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia,
Saudi Arabia.
2
Faculty of Nursing, Cairo University, Cairo, Kasr El Ainy, Egypt.
Authors’ contributions
This work was carried out in collaboration between all authors. Author AA designed the study, wrote the
protocol, supervised the work, and performed the statistical analysis. Author SAM carried out data
collection. Author SAM wrote the first draft of the manuscript. Author AA managed the literature
searches and edited the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.
Article Information
DOI: 10.9734/JSRR/2015/12046
Editor(s):
(1)
Thomas Müller, Department of Neurology, St. Joseph Hospital Berlin-Weissensee, Berlin, Germany.
Reviewers:
(1)
Dong-Hee Kim, College of Nursing, Pusan National University, South Korea.
(2)
Anonymous, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
Complete Peer review History:
http://www.sciencedomain.org/review-history.php?iid=745&id=22&aid=6801
Received 16
th
June 2014
Accepted 26
th
September 2014
Published 5
th
November 2014
ABSTRACT
Introduction:
Exposure to positive clinical learning experience influences the nursing students'
knowledge, skills, attitudes, and interest in continuing the nursing profession. It is widely
acknowledged that clinical placement evaluations while students are on placement is very useful for
better understanding of what constitutes quality clinical education from the students’ perspective to
provide better educational experiences.
Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the nursing students’ satisfaction with their clinical
placement experiences and the degree to which their experiences are regarded as positive.
Methodology: A descriptive design was used for the purpose of the study at college of Nursing in
the eastern region of Saudi Arabia. Students enrolled in clinical courses during 2010-2012 were
included. Clinical placement evaluation form was used for data collection and students were asked
to respond to three open ended questions asking them for the advantages and the disadvantages
of each clinical placement and their suggestions for improvement.
Results: The majority of the students (75.6%) agreed or strongly agreed with statements rating
their satisfaction with the clinical placement. However, students were dissatisfied with short clinical
exposures, staff nurses role and evaluation process from the clinical instructors.
Original Research Article
Abouelfettoh and Mumtin; JSRR, 4(6): 490-500, 2015; Article no.JSRR.2015.052
491
Conclusion:
Nursing students were found to be satisfied with their clinical placement but they
highlighted negative areas that could be taken into consideration by the faculty members, clinical
instructor, clinical staff as well as students to enhance the learning that takes place in the clinical
setting.
Keywords: Nursing; clinical placement; satisfaction.
1. INTRODUCTION
The clinical setting is one of the most valuable
educational resources available to nursing
schools [1]. It is an essential element to the
successful preparation of registered nurses [2-5].
The clinical experiences gained at these clinical
settings provide nursing students with the
opportunity to combine cognitive, psychomotor,
and affective skills [6]. It enhances students’
professional responsibility; assist students with
self-directed learning and acquiring decision
making and problem solving skills [7]. In clinical
placement, students are able to transfer
knowledge from classroom to real-life situations
and apply theory into practice. Additionally,
students distinguish between different settings,
internalize learning and develop self-monitoring
skills [8].
The challenges confronting nurses in today’s
rapidly changing health care environments have
highlighted the necessity for graduating students
to feel both competent and prepared for practice.
This necessity has in turn highlighted the
increasing significance of the nature and quality
of student clinical learning experiences [9,10].
Therefore, nurse educators should provide
clinical placements that offer a positive learning
environment to support the achievement of
clinical learning outcomes [11,12]. Clinical
placements need to be positive and valuable
experience [13] and in an environment conducive
to learning to promote students' personal and
professional growth. Moreover, supportive
clinical placements nurture meaningful learning
experiences. Exposure to positive clinical
learning experience has an influence on nursing
students' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and
interest to continuing in nursing profession.
Additionally, research findings suggesting that
nursing graduates are more likely to seek
employment in clinical settings in which they had
positive experiences as students [14,15].
The clinical placement environment is dyadic in
nature. It includes the ward atmosphere, the
culture and the complexities of care, and the
supervisory relationships between students,
clinical and school staff [16]. Factors affecting the
learning placement experience of nursing
students were reported in a recent research
study [17]. These factors were either related to:
(1) student nurse experiences of clinical learning
environments, (2) the supervision provided by
qualified nurses in clinical placements, and (3)
the level of interaction between student and
nurse teachers.
Early studies examined multiple facets of student
learning in clinical placement and demonstrated
the complexity and demanding nature of the
clinical environment, indicating that this area of
learning is unpredictable and far beyond the
control of faculty members [18-20]. Other studies
questioned the effectiveness of clinical settings,
claiming that they fail to provide students with
positive examples of behavior [21] and even
recognized it as a source of stress, creating
feelings of fear and anxiety which in turn affect
the students’ responses to learning [22-24].
Literature reveals a considerable overlap
between the different roles of ward managers,
suggesting that the educational role is neglected
[20,25].
More recent international studies found that the
leadership style of the ward manager remains an
important element of learning [17] and others
support that cultural and organizational factors in
the ward often influence students’ learning
experience [26,27].
Empirical studies concentrated on the
supervisory relationships and supervision that
takes place with an individual supervisor or in a
group [17]. Terms like “mentor”, “preceptor” and
“link teacher” are extensively explored to
describe a supervisory role and the one-to-one
relationship between student and mentor, or
individualized supervision was found crucial to
the process of professional development [28-31].
Other studies focused on staff–student
relationships and the impact this relationship has
on students’ learning [23,32-34]. Poor staff
relationships, lack of staff commitment to
teaching, autocratic and hierarchical
relationships, lack in the student-supervisor
relationship were found as obstructive factors for
learning, whereas feeling part of the team is
Abouelfettoh and Mumtin; JSRR, 4(6): 490-500, 2015; Article no.JSRR.2015.052
492
closely linked to the opportunity to learn
[23,30,32,35]. It is also argued that the practice
experience may not be an educational
experience because learning methods like
reflection that advance student nurses’
intellectual development are not actually
implemented [26,35].
One mean to identify and evaluate the factors
affecting the effectiveness of clinical placement
learning experience is to look at the clinical
experience through the students’ eyes [10]. It is
very useful to assess the clinical learning
experiences while students are on placement. It
is widely acknowledged that placement
evaluations are useful and valuable strategy to
adopt [36]. Through this evaluation, all involved
parties can better facilitate students learning.
Evaluations will provide students an opportunity
to reflect and examine issues of practice, enable
them to focus on particular concerns, such as
adequate orientation, availability of assistance
from staff members. I also will allow students to
express their general satisfaction or
dissatisfaction with clinical placement. Not only
students will benefit from clinical placement
evaluation, but also the educational institution
and the nursing services as well.
The evaluation of the nursing students’ clinical
placement experience will provide an opportunity
for collaboration and development of collegial
relationship between the educational institution
and nursing services in the clinical site.
Feedback from students’ clinical placement
evaluation will be shared with nursing services to
better facilitate students’ clinical placement
through planning, resources allocation and
monitoring of clinical placements. Therefore, to
provide useful insight into the undergraduate
student clinical placement, the current study aims
to assess the nursing students’ satisfaction with
their clinical placement experiences and the
degree to which their experiences are regarded
as positive.
2. MATERIALS AND METHODS
The current study aims to assess the nursing
students’ satisfaction with their clinical placement
experiences and the degree to which their
experiences are regarded as positive.
2.1 Design
Descriptive design using a self-administered
questionnaire was utilized.
2.2 Subjects
The target population was all nursing students
enrolled in nursing courses with clinical
placement during the last two academic years
(2010-2011, & 2011-2012) at the college of
nursing. Three groups of students were enrolled
in clinical courses and that was as follow:
2.2.1 The first group
The first group was stream1 students (high
school graduates) level 5 and they were enrolled
in one clinical course; nursing care of adult1
during fall 2011-2012; and that was their first
clinical exposure.
2.2.2 The second group
The second group was Stream 2 students
(graduate of baccalaureate of science) level 3
and they were enrolled in two clinical courses;
nursing care of adult 1 and nursing care of adult2
during fall 2011-2012; and that was also their first
exposure to clinical settings.
2.2.3 The third group
The third group was stream 2 and were enrolled
in 2 clinical courses; nursing care of adult 1 and
nursing care of adult 2 during fall 2010-2011
(level 3), and in three clinical courses; nursing
care of children and their families, nursing care of
childbearing women and mental health nursing
during spring 2010 – 2011 (level 4), and in three
clinical courses; critical care, nursing
management, and community health nursing
during fall 2011-2012 (level 5). Each student in
the first group (19 students) rotated through 5
clinical placements thus a total of 95 responses
could have been expected from the first group.
Eighty responses could have been expected
from the second group (16 students) as they
rotate through 5 clinical placements. Eighty
responses could have been expected from the
third group (10 students) as they rotated through
8 clinical placements. The total sample should
have consisted of 255 responses. Students
followed different clinical teaching models during
their clinical placement; preceptor, nurse buddy,
and clinical teaching instructor model.
2.3 Instrument
Data was collected using The Clinical Placement
Evaluation Form (Appendix 1) developed by
Penman and Oliver for the purpose of evaluating
Abouelfettoh and Mumtin; JSRR, 4(6): 490-500, 2015; Article no.JSRR.2015.052
493
the clinical venues providing placement for the
Discipline of Nursing and Rural Health nursing
students [1]. The form is a 12 items structured
questionnaire. The questionnaire includes items
related to the students’ satisfaction with the
general environment of the venue (item 1 & 8)
and the support provided by the staff (item 9).
The questionnaire provided information about the
capacity of the venue to meet learning objectives
(item 3), afford learning opportunities (items 4, 5,
6, & 11), and provide orientation to students
(item 7). Also students were reporting the impact
of the placement on their confidence level (item
10) and perceived value of the clinical placement
for other students (item 12). Students readiness
for the placement was also reported (item 2).
Students’ response for each item was rated on a
Likert scale from 1 to 5, where 1 indicating
strongly disagrees while 5 indicating strongly
agree. The questionnaire was validated by the
revision of experts in the field of clinical teaching.
Three open ended questions were added to the
instrument where students can express the
advantages, disadvantages of the clinical
placement and recommendations for
improvements.
2.4 Ethical Considerations and Data
Collection
The proposal was approved by the research
committee at the College and an IRB approval
from National Guard Health Affairs IRB
committee was granted on May 2013.
Participation in the study was voluntary and
anonymously. Return of the completed survey
implied consent to utilize the data for research
purposes, including publishing the findings.
Confidentiality and anonymity were maintained
throughout the study. All college students were
approached at the end of each clinical placement
and invited to participate in the study after
explanation of the purpose. Students were asked
to fill in the clinical placement evaluation
questionnaire at the end of each clinical
placement rotation for each clinical course they
were enrolled in. The questionnaire was
explained for all students to clarify any unclear
sentences.
2.5 Data Analysis
Data was analyzed using SPSS version 17 for
the quantitative data (means, standard
deviations, frequencies, percentages, and
ranges). Qualitative data was analyzed by
grouping responses into themes by the authors
and an expert faculty in clinical teaching.
3. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
A total of 45 students were approached to
participate in the study. A total of 255 responses
were expected from all of the students’ clinical
rotations. Only 205 surveys were returned, giving
a response rate of 80%. Of these responses, 79
responses from stream 1 level 5 students, 84
responses from stream 2 level 3, 21 responses
from stream 2 level 4 and 21 responses from
stream 2 level 5. Students were rotated to
different clinical areas. Fig. 1 illustrates the
percentage of students rotated through various
placement settings which included medical,
surgical, critical, nurse clinic, pediatric, maternity,
psychiatric, primary health care clinics, and
nursing management while students shadow a
nurse manager in different settings. Clinical
courses were 3 credit clinical hours with
placement of one day a week with mean duration
of 3.3±1.7 days in each clinical rotation.
Table 1 shows the overall satisfaction of the
clinical placement and Table 2 highlights the
responses of students according to the different
clinical area. It can be seen from Table 1 that
students were satisfied overall with the clinical
placement (75.6%), the students were
particularly positive (70% and above) about the
clinical experience enhancing their clinical skills,
supporting their professional growth, and the
staff willingness to assist their learning. However,
Table 2 highlights certain areas where students
were more satisfied or dissatisfied with the
clinical placement. Areas with highest
satisfaction were found in nursing clinic
placement followed by pediatric unit placement.
Areas with least satisfaction were found in
nursing management followed by psychiatric
placement Fig. 2.
Quotes from the qualitative part were identified.
The quotes presented highlight the reasons for
dissatisfaction with the clinical placement. Some
of the significant remarks from the students were:
“The clinical placement for each rotation is too
short, we could not get familiar with the unit”;
“Hope to spend more time in clinical to have
maximum advantage of learning”; “Nursing staff
are always busy with their duties and they are
unable to have both education and service role”;
“Some staff nurses are welling to and interested
in helping students in clinical placement but they
are not aware of the skills and strategies
necessary in clinical education and are not
Abouelfettoh and Mumtin; JSRR, 4(6): 490-500, 2015; Article no.JSRR.2015.052
494
prepared for their role to act as an instructor”;
“we did not learn much, we were not allowed to
practice many nursing procedures”; The
instructors have a more evaluative role than a
teaching role”; “The instructor should ensure that
the student has practiced in all clinical
procedures more than once before coming to the
clinical area and before evaluation”; “There
should be a clear plan for the clinical
assignment”; “Try to find cases in the hospital
similar to each lecture to see and understand
them clearly”; and “Concentrate on clinical
practice in hospital more than theory”. Students
also had expressed a positive response to the
placement of nurse lead clinic as they mentioned
that they have learned many nursing procedures
in the nursing clinic.
A better understanding of what constitutes quality
clinical education from the students’ perspective
would be valuable in providing better educational
experiences [10]. The current study aimed at
evaluation of nursing students’ satisfaction of
their clinical placement experience during the
2010, 211-2012 academic years. What was
extremely positive in this evaluation was that the
majority of the students were satisfied with the
clinical rotations they been through in relation;
the general environment of the venue, the
support provided by the staff, the capacity of the
venue to meet learning objectives, afford learning
opportunities, orientation provided, the impact of
the placement on their confidence level and the
value of the clinical placement for other students.
Although the study revealed an overall
satisfaction with the clinical placement, there is a
need to highlight the aspects that students found
disadvantaged their clinical experience in the
clinical setting.
Students indicated that they need more support
from the clinical staff, as about 30% of them
indicated that the staff was neither willing nor
available to help them to learn. Nursing students
always value the support provided by the nursing
staff at the clinical unit [37]. The impact of clinical
staff mentor and support on students positive
learning experience cannot be overestimated,
they play a major role in influencing the nature of
the practice environment and support provided in
this learning experience, this support foster
students independence and self-reliance. This
ultimately, affects the quality and competency of
the newly graduated nurses. Additionally, Dunn
and Hansford recommended that registered
Nurses (RNs) working on wards in which
students undertake clinical learning experiences
should be adequately prepared and supported
for their role in student learning [32]. Students
also made recommendation about the role of the
clinical instructor or the clinical faculty. Students
pointed they felt that the instructor role was more
toward evaluation which was a stress itself more
than support at the clinical area. They also
wanted to have the instructor emphasis on the
teaching rather than the evaluation.
Table 1. Nursing students’ satisfaction with the clinical placement overall (N=205)
Survey Item Students’ responses N (%)
Unsatisfied (strongly disagree,
disagree, and neutral)
Satisfied (strongly
agree, and agree)
Overall, the clinical placement was a pleasant
learning experience.
50 (24.4%) 155 (75.6%)
I felt well prepared for the placement 50 (24.4%) 155 (75.6%)
I met my objectives to my satisfaction 81 (39.5%) 124(60.5%)
The placement assisted my learning 67 (37.1%) 129 (62.9%)
The placement enhance my clinical skills 60 (29.3%) 145 (70.7%)
The placement was supportive of my
professional growth.
59 (28.8%) 146 (71.2%)
There was adequate orientation provided. 64 (31.2%) 141 (68.8%)
I was expected by the venue 84 (41.0%) 121 (59.0%)
The staff members were very willing and
available to assist my learning.
60 (29.3%) 145 (70.7%)
As a result of my experience, I feel confident
working in this venue.
74 (36.1%) 131 (63.9%)
There were many learning opportunities for me
in this venue.
55 (26.8%) 150 (73.2%)
The clinical experience would benefit the other
students
65 (31.7%) 140 (68.3%)
Abouelfettoh and Mumtin; JSRR, 4(6): 490-500, 2015; Article no.JSRR.2015.052
495
Fig. 1. Percentage of students’ responses by clinical settings
Fig. 2. Mean percentage of students satisfaction for each clinical setting
The role of the clinical faculty is a dynamic one
that needs active engagement in identifying the
needs of the student in order to ensure that
students become competent, professional,
knowledgeable and caring in their approach [38].
Literature indicates that there are however no
clear answers around various aspects of
supervision including the issue of optimal length
and frequency of supervision [17,39]. Whilst
observation and evaluation are necessary
aspects of the clinical learning environment, they
should be performed in a supportive, non-
threatening manner and be used for formative
guidance, not just summative evaluation [22].
The method of supervision, the number of
separate supervision sessions and the
psychological content of supervisory contact
within a positive ward atmosphere were reported
that they are the most important variables in the
students’ clinical learning [17]. This again
emphasizes the importance of utilizing clinical
facilitators who are competent and skilled and
who know how and what to teach. Students
should not feel that someone is looking over their
shoulder waiting for the opportunity to criticize.
Instead they should feel that they have
immediate help and support available to guide
them through difficult tasks at any time they need
it. Students’ feelings of incompetence can be
decreased by creating a climate for learning
where less than perfect ‘behavior’ is acceptable.
68
40
31 25
7 7 7 7 13
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
Clinical Setting
65 62.4
74.9 81.9 77.7
67 66.7 72.6
59.5
0
20
40
60
80
100
Students Satisfaction
Abouelfettoh and Mumtin; JSRR, 4(6): 490-500, 2015; Article no.JSRR.2015.052
496
Table 2. Distribution of students’ satisfaction with clinical placement by the clinical setting / (N=205)
item
Medical
(n=139) %
Surgical
(n=82) %
Critical
(n= 63) %
Nurse
clinic
(n=51) %
Pediatric
(n=14) %
Maternity
(n=14) %
Psych
(n=14) %
PHC
(n=14) %
Management
(n=26) %
Overall, the clinical placement
was pleasant
(102)73.6% (59)72.5% (53)83.9%
(49)96% (12)85.7%
(10)71.4%
(10) 57.1%
(10)71.4%
(12)
46.2%
I felt well prepared for the
placement
(78)55.9% (43)52.5% (45)70.9%
(39)76% (10)71.4%
(12)85.7%
(11)75.5%
(6)42.9%
(10)38.5%
I met my objectives to my
satisfaction
(82)58.8% (47)57.5% (47)74.2%
(33)64% (10)71.4%
(12)85.7%
(10)71.5%
(8)57.1% (14)53.9%
The placement assisted my
learning
(104)75.1% (51)62.5% (49)77.4%
(39)76% (12)85.7%
(8)57.2% (8)57.2% (8)57.1% (16)61.5%
The placement enhance my
clinical skills
(102)73.5% (62)75% (47)74.2%
(39)76% (12)85.7%
(10)71.4%
(8)57.2% (10)57.2%
(10)38.5
%
The placement was
supportive of my growth.
(86)61.7% (49)60% (53)83.8%
(45)88% (12)85.7%
(12)85.7%
(8)57.2% (8)57.1% (14)53.9%
There was adequate
orientation provided.
(74)52.9% (41)50% (43)67.7%
(35)68% (10)71.4%
(6)42.9% (10)71.5%
(12)85.8%
(16)61.5%
I was expected by the venue (80)57.4% (55)67.5% (47)74.2%
(43)84% (14)100% (10)71.5%
(12)85.8%
(14)100% (20)77%
The staff members were very
willing and available to assist
my learning.
(83)60.3% (39)47.5% (47)74.2%
(45)88% (8)57.2% (8)57.2% (8)57.2% (12)85.7%
(16)61.6%
As a result of my experience,
I feel confident working in this
venue.
(94)67.6% (57)70% (47)74.2%
(45)88% (12)85.7%
(12)85.7%
(10)71.4%
(12)85.8%
(16)61.5%
There were many learning
opportunities for me in this
venue.
(92)66.2% (53)65% (47)74.2%
(41)80% (8)57.2% (10)71.5%
(10)71.4%
(10)57.1%
(16)61.6%
The clinical experience would
benefit the other students
(96)69.1% (53)65% (47)74.2%
(46)90% (10)71.5%
(8)57.2% (10)71.4%
(10)71.4%
(16)61.6%
Weighted mean ± SD 64.8±7.2 62.4±8.5%
74.9±4.4 81.9±9.1 77.7±12.3 67±13.6 66.7±9.2 72.6±13.3
59.5±10.6
Abouelfettoh and Mumtin; JSRR, 4(6): 490-500, 2015; Article no.JSRR.2015.052
497
It was concerning to note that more than half of
students in nursing management course
indicated that the placement was not pleasant,
the placement did not enhanced their clinical
skills and they felt not well prepared for the
clinical placement. This results might be due to
the nature of the nursing management subject
as it has a newly taught hard concept as well as
some of the students had to register for the
course without taking any previous clinical
course. Although this is a concern that need
further exploration by the college we also need to
note that 60% or more of the students in the
Nursing Management Course indicated that there
were many learning opportunities in the
placement as well as they felt confidence at the
end of the placement. The question arise her
whether confidence related to knowledge.
However other studies have reported that
students have express concerns about
preparation for the clinical placement and
recommendations were made to address the
concerns for their particular setting [1].
4. CONCLUSION
The study gets the attention to the many positive
as well as negative aspects of the clinical
experience of the nursing students at the college.
It raises the need for collaboration between the
higher education and health care sectors to
make the clinical learning environment best meet
the needs of undergraduate nursing students.
This collaboration should aims to establish
creative models for clinical education which take
into account current health and education so
reforms. A nurturing and supportive environment
can be created when organizational aims of the
service and educational sectors are merged in a
climate that encourages collaborative learning,
trust and mutual respect [40].
Opportunities should be made available for
students to reflect and verbalize their feelings
about their clinical experiences, positive or
negative using innovative exploratory methods
such as contracts and reflective diaries [41].
5. LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY
Because of the small number of the students at
the college and the limited clinical sites further
studies need to be conducted with larger sample
and in different settings.
COMPETING INTERESTS
Authors have declared that no competing
interests exist.
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500
APPENDIX
Appendix 1. Clinical placement evaluation form
Strongly
disagree
Strongly
agree
1) Overall, the clinical placement was a pleasant
learning experience.
1 2 3 4 5
2) I felt well prepared for the placement 1 2 3 4 5
3) I met my objectives to my satisfaction 1 2 3 4 5
4) The placement assisted my learning 1 2 3 4 5
5) The placement enhance my clinical skills 1 2 3 4 5
6) The placement was supportive of my
professional growth.
1 2 3 4 5
7) There was adequate orientation provided. 1 2 3 4 5
8) I was expected by the venue 1 2 3 4 5
9) The staff members were very willing and
available to assist my learning.
1 2 3 4 5
10) As a result of my experience, I feel confident
working in this venue.
1 2 3 4 5
11) There were many learning opportunities for me
in this venue.
1 2 3 4 5
12) The clinical experience would benefit the other
students
1 2 3 4 5
_________________________________________________________________________________
© 2015 Abouelfettoh and Mumtin; This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons
Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction
in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Peer-review history:
The peer review history for this paper can be accessed here:
http://www.sciencedomain.org/review-history.php?iid=745&id=22&aid=6801
... Hence, the students' clinical perspective on quality of clinical education contributes to the knowledge for the development of better educational experiences. In addition [26], and [27] highlighted the importance of assessing the clinical learning experiences while students are on placement. ...
... Students suggested recommendation regarding the duration of the clinical placement and the role of the clinical instructors as follows: "increase period of each clinical rotation for maximizing efficiency of necessary skills"; "the instructor should ensure that the student has practiced in all clinical procedures more than once before coming to the clinical area and before evaluation"; "give incentive and rewards based on academic performance in clinic areas"; and "constructive feedback should be given to students"; and "the instructor should emphasize on the teaching rather than the evaluation". Similar comments are documented by other studies [43], and [27]. ...
... A study entitled "Nursing student's perception of anxiety-producing situations in the clinical setting" by [41] viewed observation and evaluation of students as necessary aspects of the clinical learning environment, should be performed in a supportive, nonthreatening manner and be used for formative guidance, not just summative evaluation. Therefore, [27] Less than half of the nursing students had lower academic self-efficacy; however, this frustrating result was expected as the students affiliated to technical nursing institute were deprived from students' services and activities rendered to other students affiliated to all faculties of the university. Participants of this study were suffering from many problems such as failure to allocate a separate building for them and the current location lacks the existence of essential educational constituents (skills labs, computer labs, language labs, and halls to change clothes and places to eat and enough toilets to accommodate the number of students… etc). ...
... It is well established that student nurses perceive clinical placement as rewarding [8] since it has the tendency to improve their clinical skills, connect theory with practice and support their professional growth [8][9][10][11][12]. Notwithstanding, the clinical environment presents numerous challenges to students [3,[13][14][15]. ...
... This study explored the experiences of baccalaureate student nurses regarding intra-semester clinical practicum. The findings showed that students perceived intra-semester clinical practicum as beneficial since it afforded the opportunity to translate theory into practice concurrently as previously reported in other studies [8,10,22]. For instance, in Saudi Arabia, about 75.6% (n = 205) of nursing students were satisfied with their clinical practicum [10]. ...
... The findings showed that students perceived intra-semester clinical practicum as beneficial since it afforded the opportunity to translate theory into practice concurrently as previously reported in other studies [8,10,22]. For instance, in Saudi Arabia, about 75.6% (n = 205) of nursing students were satisfied with their clinical practicum [10]. The similarities may have resulted from the fact that student nurses recognised nursing as both an art and science and therefore understood the importance of the practical component. ...
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Background Clinical practicum is an integral part of nursing education because it provides students with opportunities to perform nursing care and practice specific nursing tasks. In Ghana, little is known about the experiences of baccalaureate student nurses with regard to intra-semester clinical practicum. This study therefore, explored perceptions, challenges, and how the intra-semester clinical practicum affects the learning process of student nurses in a private university in Ghana. Methods Exploratory descriptive phenomenological design was used. Nine in-depth interviews and three focus group discussions were conducted for baccalaureate student nurses in their second, third and fourth years of study. Only those who have attended intra-semester clinical practicum for at least two semesters in the course of their study were recruited. Purposive sampling technique was used to select the participants. The sample size was based on data saturation, however, a total of 33 participants were recruited. Data was analysed using content analysis technique. Results The findings show that baccalaureate student nurses perceive the intra-semester clinical practicum as beneficial. It affords the opportunity to translate theoretical knowledge into practice concurrently. However, students recounted their stressful experiences during the clinical period which negatively affected their academic work. Additionally, staff nurses assigned the students to do menial jobs instead of appropriate nursing tasks. Conclusions A review of the “block” method in which students will go to clinicals for a stipulated number of consecutive days in a month and then resume lectures, is worth considering. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (10.1186/s12912-018-0292-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
... Hence, the students' clinical perspective on quality of clinical education contributes to the knowledge for the development of better educational experiences. In addition [26], and [27] highlighted the importance of assessing the clinical learning experiences while students are on placement. ...
... Students suggested recommendation regarding the duration of the clinical placement and the role of the clinical instructors as follows: "increase period of each clinical rotation for maximizing efficiency of necessary skills"; "the instructor should ensure that the student has practiced in all clinical procedures more than once before coming to the clinical area and before evaluation"; "give incentive and rewards based on academic performance in clinic areas"; and "constructive feedback should be given to students"; and "the instructor should emphasize on the teaching rather than the evaluation". Similar comments are documented by other studies [43], and [27]. ...
... A study entitled "Nursing student's perception of anxiety-producing situations in the clinical setting" by [41] viewed observation and evaluation of students as necessary aspects of the clinical learning environment, should be performed in a supportive, nonthreatening manner and be used for formative guidance, not just summative evaluation. Therefore, [27] Less than half of the nursing students had lower academic self-efficacy; however, this frustrating result was expected as the students affiliated to technical nursing institute were deprived from students' services and activities rendered to other students affiliated to all faculties of the university. Participants of this study were suffering from many problems such as failure to allocate a separate building for them and the current location lacks the existence of essential educational constituents (skills labs, computer labs, language labs, and halls to change clothes and places to eat and enough toilets to accommodate the number of students… etc). ...
... do not provide pharmaceutical care in community pharmacy settings. 16 Additionally, the placements may not be enjoyable, the experience may not improve their clinical skills, and students may not feel ready for clinical placements in the future. The preceptors' jobs are dynamic, requiring a commitment to recognizing the needs of the students and ensuring that they are equipped to be proficient, educated, and mindful in their practice. ...
... e positive pedagogical environment allows students to be motivated, feel involved in ward activities, have good relationships with other team members, and explore practices [7,11]. e leadership style of the ward manager remains a crucial element of experiential learning in the clinical setting [12]. A good learning environment is characterized by a democratic leadership style, where the ward manager is aware of the physical and emotional needs of the nursing staff and students and stimulates participation in a wide range of experiences that promote learning [4,13]. ...
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Background: The clinical learning environment and clinical rotation experience of students are integral to nursing curriculum and are a crucial component of nursing education which helps transform theoretical knowledge to clinical practical skills. Objective: This study was aimed at assessing the role of the clinical learning environment on undergraduate nursing and midwifery students' satisfaction with their clinical rotation experience. Method: The study employed a quantitative cross-sectional survey design. Data was collected from a sample of 240 undergraduate nursing and midwifery students of the University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana, using a structured questionnaire. Ethical approval was obtained from the University of Cape Coast Ethics Review Board. Descriptive analysis was displayed as frequencies and percentages. Inferentially, Fisher's exact test, linear regression, and Spearman's correlation tests were used to test for and quantify associations between independent and dependent variables at p ≤ 0.05. Results: The level of students' satisfaction with both clinical rotation experience and the clinical learning environment was high (65.6% and 63.5%, respectively). A statistically significant association of the students' satisfaction with their clinical rotation experience was found. There was a statistically significant relationship between the clinical learning environment (χ2 (9, N = 224) = 80.665, p < 0.001), pedagogical atmosphere in the clinical area (r s = 0.379, p < 0.001), the leadership style of the ward manager (r s = 0.340, p < 0.001), the premises of nursing in the ward environment (r s = 0.501, p < 0.001), and the students' satisfaction with their clinical rotation experience. Conclusion: These findings provide nurse educators and clinicians with meaningful understanding about areas to prioritise when planning clinical learning opportunities in such a way that skills learning and practice of nursing skills are successful and satisfactory for undergraduate student nurses and midwives.
... As for students' academic self-perception in the clinical training of community health nursing; less than half and more than half of the current study faculty of nursing and technical institute of nursing students had positive perception related to academic self-perception. Vice versa Abou elfettoh and Al Mumtin, (2015 ) (15) mentioned that students were dissatisfied with evaluation process from the clinical instructors. This could be attributed to using different stratifies in clinical training in the present study ranked in order of use to; demonstration, simulation, role play, and case study. ...
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... In many recent studies, students' satisfaction has been consistently identified as an important factor in a "good" clinical learning environment (Lee et al.,2009). Although the CLE has been investigated in various educational respects, there is a scarcity of studies exploring the nursing students' point of view from the standpoint of their satisfaction with the CLE on a worldwide basis (Abouelfettoh and Mumtin, 2014). The satisfaction of students is very important in the assessment of teaching at the faculties and may have a considerable role in monitoring, identifying positive and deficient areas and implementing necessary revisions of an educational program (Jamelske ,2009). ...
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Clinical learning is foundational to the University of South Australia’s Bachelor of Nursing program and students are expected to undertake a variety of clinical experiences during the three-year program. The Discipline of Nursing and Rural Health, in collaboration with academics, clinicians and managers, developed an instrument to evaluate contextual learning, involvement and reflection of nursing students during clinical placements. Following a simple research study using the instrument, it was decided to continue such evaluation on an ongoing basis. The instrument was found to be beneficial for students, industry partners and academics in attaining feedback. The purpose of this paper is threefold: to illustrate the process by which the evaluative instrument was developed, to report the results of the survey, and to explore the positive learning outcomes that might result with the use of the instrument.
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This phenomenological study explores and describes the 'lived' experiences of general student nurses on their first clinical placement in an Irish School of Nursing. The research question: 'What are the experiences of general student nurses on their first clinical placement?' provided the focus for the study. In-depth interviews were conducted with nine female student nurses and one male student nurse. Data from the interviews were collected, recorded and analysed using framework (Coliazzi, P., 1978 . Psychological research as the phenomenologist views it. In: Valle, R.S., King, M. (Eds.), Existential Phenomenological Alternatives for Psychology, Oxford University Press, New York). Five core themes emerged: self-awareness, confidence, anxiety, facilitation and professional issues. The findings revealed that the standard of preparation for the placement was viewed positively though some aspects of preparation require a critical shift in thinking towards meeting the students' needs in future curriculum planning. The conclusions of the study indicate that the presence of mutual respect and regard for others had a positive impact on the students' self-esteem. The acquisition of knowledge led to an increase in confidence levels that subsequently reduced anxiety. This enhanced the learning process that was dependant upon the collaborative support and facilitation in the clinical learning environment. The findings prepare the way for further research that could continue to develop and maximise the educational value and clinical experience for undergraduate nursing students.
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Dedicated Education Units (DEU) are, existing health care units collaboratively developed by clinicians and academics as clinical teaching and learning environments dedicated to students from Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. Throughout each semester students from all year levels work together as peer teachers and learners supported by academics and clinicians. The School of Nursing and Midwifery first introduced the Dedication Education Units in 1997 with the aim of providing optimal and flexible clinical learning environments for undergraduate nursing students. In this evaluative study students (n=121) and clinicians (n=127) perceived the DEU clinical placement configuration to: maintain quality of patient care, foster student relationships, provide an environment where students and academics were accepted as members of the clinical team and increase the collaborative relationship between clinicians, students and academics.