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Dinámicas Poblacionales En El Centro De La Península Ibérica Duranteel Pleistoceno Superior: Un Nuevo Proyecto Geoarqueológico

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Abstract

(Late Pleistocene population dynamics in Central Iberia: a new geoarchaeological project): We present a new research project aimed at investigating population dynamics and human-environment interactions during the second half of the Late Pleistocene in Central Iberia. In this communication we discuss the state-of-the-art on the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic settlement of the Iberian plateau and we propose new avenues of research for testing the validity of the currently accepted interpretations. It is our hypothesis that models on Late Pleistocene population dynamics in the Iberian interior lands are still biased by the poor quantity and quality of data available, especially for the Upper Palaeolithic. Our project is focused on the geoarchaeological study of 3 selected sites located in the Upper Tagus basin (Northern area of Guadalajara province, Spain).Our methods include micromorpholgy, high resolution sedimentology, 14C, OSL and U/Th dating, pollen, phytolith, microfaunal and anthracological analyses, as well as lithic technology, taphonomy and zooarchaeology.

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... The presence of hominin remains within Iberian Peninsula, especially in the South and North Plateaus and the Sistema Central mountain range region, is quite infrequent (Fig. 5), consisting of a few fragmentary Neandertal remains, which are usually accumulated by carnivores (Basabe 1973b;Quam et al. 2001;Arsuaga et al. 2012a). Although there are a few Upper Paleolithic sites inland on the Iberian Peninsula (Estrada García et al. 1992;Alcolea González et al. 1995;Alcaraz-Castaño 2015;Alcaraz-Castaño et al. 2013, 2015aYravedra et al. 2016;Alcaraz-Castaño et al. 2017), Upper (Arsuaga et al. 2012a;Baquedano et al. 2014). 5 Carihuela (Garcia-Sanchez et al. 1994). ...
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El presente trabajo ofrece una revisión crítica del Paleolítico superior en la Meseta a la luz de los nuevos hallazgos producidos en los últimos años con una síntesis de las evidencias disponibles y su marco cro-nológico. Se interpreta en detalle el asentamiento segoviano de la Peña de Estebanvela. La riqueza de su registro arqueológico, la amplia secuencia cronoestratigráfica que presenta, así como la aplicación en su estudio de una metodología pluridisciplinar, hacen de este yacimiento un referente para el estudio del Magdaleniense en la Meseta. Por último, se muestra una breve revisión de las estaciones con arte rupes-tre del interior peninsular.
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Previous geochronological and archaeological studies on the rock shelter Jarama VI suggested a late survival of Neanderthals in central Iberia and the presence of lithic assemblages of Early Upper Paleolithic affinity. New data on granulometry, mineralogical composition, geochemical fingerprints and micromorphology of the sequence corroborate the previous notion that the archaeological units JVI.2.1 to JVI.2.3 are slackwater deposits of superfloods, which did not experience significant post-depositional changes, whereas the artifact-rich units JVI3 and JVI.1 mainly received sediment inputs by sheetwash and cave spall. New AMS radiocarbon measurements on three samples of cut-marked bone using the ultrafiltration technique yielded ages close to, or beyond, the limit of radiocarbon dating at ca. 50 C-14 ka BP, and hence suggest much higher antiquity than assumed previously. Furthermore, elevated temperature post-IR IRSL luminescence measurements on K feldspars yielded burial ages for subunits JVI.2.2 and JVI.2.3 between 50 and 60 ka. Finally, our reappraisal of the stone industry strongly suggests that the whole sequence is of Mousterian affinity. In conclusion, Jarama VI most probably does not document a late survival of Neanderthals nor an Early Upper Paleolithic occupation in central Iberia, but rather indicates an occupation breakdown after the Middle Paleolithic. (c) 2013 University of Washington. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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