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Patterns and sustainability of sit-stand workstation use in a typical office workplace – Protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

Conference Paper (PDF Available)  · June 2015with238 Reads

Conference: Conference: International Society of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity
Abstract
Recent evidence suggests that sedentary behaviour (SB) is linked to multiple poor health outcomes, independent of physical activity level (Thorp et al., 2011). Office workers spend up to 75% of the working day sedentary, often in prolonged periods extending 30 minutes (Evans et al., 2012, Neuhaus et al., 2014). Using sit-stand workstations has been shown to be acceptable and feasible by office workers (Chau et al, 2014) and contributes to reductions in sitting in the short term (Alkhaja et al., 2012, Neuhaus et al., 2014). However the long term effectiveness and sustainability of sit-stand workstation use as well as any potential ‘novelty effect’ in new users has not been described. In addition there is little information on the patterns of desk use and interruptions to sitting which may be more important for health outcomes (Chinapaw et al., 2014). To date sit-stand workstations use has been determined by self-report diary, and their effectiveness has been attributed to the objectively measured SB of the desk user. Self-report of desk use is subject to social desirability and recall bias and objective measurement of SB among desk users assumes that reductions in sitting are a result of sit-stand workstation use. Objective monitoring of the desk height/movement married to objectively measured SB in users may overcome this methodological problem. The proposed RCT will examine the effects of providing a sit-stand workstation on SB in office workers over a 12-month period. 40 office-based university staff aged 18-65 years will be randomized into a control group (SB in usual environment) or intervention group (SB and sit-stand workstation). Sedentary behaviour will be objectively measured using an accelerometer (activPAL, PAL Technologies Ltd, Glasgow, UK) worn for 7 days pre-intervention and at 2 weeks, 2, 5, 8 and 12 months following desk installation. Desk height/movement/usage will be monitored objectively throughout the 12-month period using the Java Sun Spot wireless sensor network which will be attached to the top shelf of the desk. Participants will complete self-report workstation use but will be blinded to the objective measure of its use. The findings of the study will provide useful information on the pattern and sustainability of sit-stand desk use and inform interventions to reduce SB in the workplace.
BACKGROUND
Recent evidence suggests that sedentary be-
haviour (SB) is linked to multiple poor health
outcomes, independent of physical activity
level (Thorp et al., 2011).
O ce workers spend up to 75% of the working
day sedentary, often in prolonged periods ex-
tending 30 minutes (Evans et al., 2012, Neu-
haus et al., 2014).
Using sit-stand workstations has been shown
to be acceptable and feasible by o ce work-
ers (Chau et al, 2014) and contributes to re-
ductions in sitting in the short term (Alkhaja
et al., 2012, Neuhaus et al., 2014).
PURPOSE
The long term e ectiveness and sustainability of
sit-stand workstation use as well as any poten-
tial ‘novelty e ect’ in new users has not been de-
scribed.
In addition there is little information on the pat-
terns of desk use and interruptions to sitting
which may be more important for health out-
comes (Chinapaw et al., 2014).
To date sit-stand
workstations use
has been deter-
mined by self-re-
port diary, and
their e ectiveness
has been attribut-
ed to the objective-
ly measured SB of
the desk user.
Self-report of desk use is subject to social desir-
ability and recall bias and objective measurement
of SB among desk users assumes that reductions
in sitting are a result of sit-stand workstation use.
Objective monitoring of the desk height/move-
ment married to objectively measured SB in us-
ers may overcome this methodological problem.
The ndings of the study will provide use-
ful information on the pattern and sustain-
ability of sit-stand desk use and inform in-
terventions to reduce SB in the workplace.
Jacqueline L Mair1, Chris Nugent2, Ian Cleland2, Charlotte Schmitz3, and Marie H Murphy1
1 Centre for Physical Activity and Health Research, Ulster University, Northern Ireland, UK, 2 Computer Science Research Institute, Ulster University, Northern Ireland, UK, 3 Ergotron Inc., Minnesota, USA
Patterns and sustainability of sit-stand workstation use in a typical
office workplace – Protocol for a randomized controlled trial.
References
Alkhajah AT, Reeves MM, Eakin EG, Winkler EAH, Owen N, Healy GN. 2012. Sit–Stand Workstations A Pilot
Intervention to Reduce Of ce Sitting Time. Am J Prev Med; 43(3):298-303. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ame-
pre.2012.05.027
Chau JY, Daley M, Srinivasan A, Dunn S, Bauman AE, van der Ploeg HP. 2014. Desk-based workers’ perspectives on
using sit-stand workstations: a qualitative analysis of the Stand@Work study. BMC Public Health;14:752.
Chinapaw MJM, de Niet M, Verloigne M, De Bourdeaudhuij I, Brug J, Altenburg TM. 2014. From sedentary time to
sedentary patterns: Accelerometer data reduction decisions in youth. PLoS ONE; 9(11): e111205. doi:10.1371/journal.
pone.0111205
Evans RE, Fawole HO, Sheriff SA, Dall PM, Grant PM and Ryan CG. 2012. Point-of-choice prompts to reduce sitting
time at work: a randomized trial.
Thorp AA, Owen N, Neuhaus M, Dunstan DW. 2011. Sedentary behaviours and subsequent health outcomes in adults.
A systematic review of longitudinal studies, 1996-2011. Am J Prev Med;41(2):207–215
Ergotron WorkFit sit-stand desks and stands allow manual adjustment
from sitting to standing height throughout the work day.
Data from accelerometer attached to the standing desk. The activities of lowering/raising
and typing on the desk, along with non-use can clearly be seen.
Java Sun Spot
activPALTM
METHODS
measurement tools
• Sedentary behaviour will be objectively measured using an accelerometer (activPAL, PAL Tech-
nologies Ltd, Glasgow, UK) worn for 7 days pre-intervention and at 2 weeks, 2, 5, 8 and 12 months
following desk installation.
• Desk height/movement/usage will be monitored objectively throughout the 12-month period
using the Java Sun Spot wireless sensor network which will be attached to the top shelf of the desk.
• Participants will complete self-report workstation use be will beblined to the objective measure
of its use.
intervention
The proposed RCT will examine the e ects of providing a sit-stand workstation on SB in o ce
workers over a 12-month period.
cohort
40 o ce-based university sta aged
18-65 years will be randomized into
• control group (SB in usual
environment) or
• intervention group (SB and
sit-stand workstation).
Mair, Jacqueline e15027336@uucde.ulst.ac.uk; Nugent, Christopher cd.nugent@ulster.ac.uk; Cleland, Ian i.cleland@ulster.ac.uk; Murphy, Marie mh.murphy@ulster.ac.uk; Schmitz, Charlotte cschmitz@ergotron.com
UP TO
Percentage of working day that
office workers spend sedentary
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