INNOVATION MANAGEMENT (UNE-CEN/TS 16555-1:2013) APPLIED TO SUPERIOR EDUCATION: INTEGRATION OF DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE TEACHING OF CHEMISTRY

Conference Paper (PDF Available) · July 2015with 1,666 Reads
Conference: 7th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies July 6th-8th, 2015 — Barcelona, Spain, At Barcelona
Abstract
Brussels-based CEN (the European Committee for Standardization) is the solely recognizedorganization for the planning drafting and adoption of European Standards in all major areas of business. Concretely, on July, 2013, was published the UNE-CEN/TS 16555-1:2013, the European Standard for Innovation Management. This technical specification provides guidance on establishing and maintaining an innovation management system (IMS). On the other hand, when considering the range of available technologies and their potential impacts on learning, an important distinction can be made between two categories of technology tools. With the first of them, students essentially learn "from" the technology. Technologies of the second type are those that engage students in communication, hypothesis testing, and interactive information sharing. Also sometimes referred to as “disruptive technologies”, second-type applications have proven to be powerful agents of change in the classroom when teachers learn to adapt their instructional practice to the design and capabilities of these “cognitive tools”. Taking into account the above mentioned aspects, this works presents the integration of disruptive technologies for the teaching of Chemistry, from the point of view of the innovation management. In this context, innovation management techniques can be used to plan activities at the superior educational level. On the other hand, when integrated meaningfully into curriculum and instruction, technology can positively impact student learning and achievement. Likewise, students using simulations can gain deeper and more flexible knowledge of scientific concepts. In fact, when integrated into curriculum-based student-centred classroom activities, tools such as word processors, spreadsheets, databases, modelling and presentation software can promote the development of such 21st century skills as communication, collaboration, and analytical thinking. “Meaningful integration” of technology, then, refers to the process of matching the most effective tool with the most effective pedagogy to achieve the learning goals of a particular lesson.
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