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Staffing Patterns of State Colleges of Education Libraries in Nigeria

Authors:
  • Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta

Abstract

The College of Education system is one of the tripods of tertiary education in Nigeria and it has the primary role of training teachers who will be awarded the minimum teaching qualification of Nigerian Certificate of Education (NCE). This certificate qualifies one to teach in junior secondary schools and technical colleges in Nigeria and it takes three years to complete. These teachers’ institutions were formally known as Advanced Teachers’ Colleges and were affiliated to different universities in Nigeria. They were later transformed into Colleges of Education under the supervision of one umbrella body known as the National Commission for Colleges of Education (NCCE) established in 1989. There are 64 colleges of education in Nigeria, classified according to their ownership; hence, we have 20 federal, 39 state, 1military and 4 private colleges of education. The state colleges of education are established and funded by their respective State governments. (NCCE, 1996, NCCE, 2002).
http://unllib.unl.edu/LPP/
Library Philosophy and Practice 2011
ISSN 1522 - 0222
Staffing Patterns of State
Colleges of Education
Libraries in Nigeria
Gabriel Olatunde Onifade
Deputy Librarian
Gani Belo Library
Federal College of Education
Abeokuta, Nigeria
Fehintola Nike Onifade
Principal Librarian
University of Agriculture
Abeokuta, Nigeria
Introduction
The College of Education system is one of the tripods of tertiary education in
Nigeria and it has the primary role of training teachers who will be awarded the
minimum teaching qualification of Nigerian Certificate of Education (NCE). This
certificate qualifies one to teach in junior secondary schools and technical colleges
in Nigeria and it takes three years to complete. These teachers’ institutions were
formally known as Advanced Teachers’ Colleges and were affiliated to different
universities in Nigeria. They were later transformed into Colleges of Education
under the supervision of one umbrella body known as the National Commission for
Colleges of Education (NCCE) established in 1989. There are 64 colleges of
education in Nigeria, classified according to their ownership; hence, we have 20
federal, 39 state, 1military and 4 private colleges of education. The state colleges
of education are established and funded by their respective State governments.
(NCCE, 1996, NCCE, 2002).
Literature Review
Education has been described as the bed rock of every society and the tools for
nation building, therefore for qualitative education to be achieved; the supply of
teachers must be adequate in quantity and quality (Adegbesan 2010). Ukeje
(1995) emphasized that education unlocks the door to modernization, but it is the
teacher who holds the key to the door. In corroborating this, Gambo (1999) argued
that “the Nigerian teachers must be intellectually, conscientiously, highly motivated
and professionally sound individuals that are capable of discharging their
professional obligations to the nation. As a result such individual must be ever
learning, up-to-date in knowledge, skills and ideas and very adaptable to changing
needs and situation.
In recognizing the vital roles of teachers, the Federal Government of Nigeria stated
in its National Policy of Education that teachers’ education will continue to be given
a major emphasis in all the nation’s educational planning efforts (Federal Republic
of Nigeria 1989). Jekayinfa (2010) traced the origin of teachers’ education to the
beginning of western education in Nigeria when the first teachers’ college known
as ‘The Training Institution’ was established in Abeokuta in 1859 by Church
Missionary Society. The school was later moved to Oyo to become the St Andrew
College and later upgraded to be the Oyo State College of Education. Later on the
National Commission for Colleges of Education (NCCE) was established by Act 3
of January 1989 and was amended by Act 12 of 1993 as a completion of tripod of
excellence in supervision of higher education in Nigeria (NCCE online 2010). This
commission provides accreditation services for Colleges of Education and
maintains standards through periodic accreditation visits.
Sanusi (2006) observed that the Colleges of Education can not accomplish their
tasks without the back-up of relevant and functional libraries. Hence, the National
Commission for Colleges of Education mandated all the Colleges of Education to
have functional libraries in order to achieve their academic purpose. These
libraries have the goals of assisting their colleges by providing learning and
reading resources in order to achieve the objectives of producing well molded
teachers in their chosen disciplines. However, to be functional and successful in its
operations, a library needs skilled, qualified and adequate human resources to
make up the staff (Egunjobi 2006). Arugbayi (2009) also corroborated that the
strength of a good educational programme is not the beautiful buildings, adequate
equipment/facilities, sound curriculum but the quality and quantity of the staff. In
other words, staff that will build up and maintain the collection of a library as well
as provide various services to the students and academic staff of a college is
indispensable in a library. Oriowo (2001) contended that the success or failure of a
library depends on the skill and abilities of people who make up the staff. Hence,
staff must be sufficient in number to meet the demand made upon it, and it should
have the right mixture of qualifications and experience in order to perform to users’
expectation.
Staff in colleges of education libraries is categorized into professionals (librarians),
sub-professionals (library officers) and non-professionals. The duties of these three
categories of staff are different but interwoven and any laxity on the part of a given
group will affect the duties of others (Egunjobi, 2002). This emphasizes the
importance of adequate staffing in a library both in term of quantity and quality.
Egunjobi (2006) observed that the number of staff needed by a library is usually
determined by the number of population to be served as well as the collection of
the library, by implication whenever the number of library staff is inadequate both
in number and quality, there may be tendency to over-stretch those on ground and
the quality of services provided may not be adequate for the population they are
meant to serve.
According to the National Commission for Colleges of Education standard for
running libraries, the posts in the college library were divided into professional,
sub-professionals and non-professionals posts. The NCCE standard also specified
that the professionals are those who have acquired the skills and training in
librarianship and processed at least a first degree or its equivalent in library and
information studies and are employed on the career cadre of ‘librarianship’ in the
college system. The sub-professionals are library officers who hold diploma
certificates in librarianship; they assist librarians in the technical and service
functions of the library while the non-professional posts comprise the library
assistants. The professional staff of the library is also treated as academic staff in
terms of appointment, promotion and other conditions of service (NCCE 1994).
Although, this recognition did not come until after a protracted battle and
subsequent agreement between the Academic Staff Union of Universities and the
Federal Government (Egunjobi 2001).
Sequel to the above Egunjobi (2006) claimed that librarians in the college system
could not be left out in research activities; nevertheless, the librarians have lived
up to expectations, competing favourably well with their teaching counterparts in
publishing their research work. However, Agboola (2000) generally declared that
academic libraries are the most developed in terms of funding, staffing, stock and
services in Nigerian librarianship. The NCCE standard also stated that a college
library shall operate with not less than three professional staff and it shall maintain
a staff ratio of 1:5 (i.e., one professional to 5non-professional staff).
Statement of the Problem
Staffing in a library set up is very important. However, as important as it is, staffing
is often taken for granted or ignored in some colleges of education libraries, such
that staff vacancies may not be filled, while those on ground are often over-stretch
thereby making the services of the library inadequate for the community they are
meant to serve. Hence this study set out to examine the staffing pattern of State
Colleges of Education libraries in Nigeria.
Objectives of the Study
The objective of this study is to examine:
The number of professional and paraprofessional staff in Nigerian State
Colleges of Education Libraries
The number of librarians as against the number of population served as well
as against the volume of collection the libraries; and
The quality of professional staff in terms of qualification in Nigerian
state colleges of education libraries.
Scope
This study is limited to staffing patterns in state colleges of education libraries in
Nigeria. The state colleges of education in Nigeria are those which receive funding
from their respective state governments. Clerical and other administrative staff is
not included in this study.
Research Questions
1. What is the staffing pattern of State Colleges of Education in Nigeria?
2. Are there more professional than sub professional staff in State Colleges of
Education libraries in Nigeria?
3. What is the ratio of librarians to the population served and to collection of their
libraries?
4. What proportions of the professional librarians are male?
5. What proportions of the professional librarians are female?
6. What is the most common qualification held by librarians in the college libraries
surveyed?
Methodology
The survey method was used for this study. Questionnaire was used as the main
instrument of data collection. 39 copies of questionnaires were directly mailed to
the heads of libraries in all state colleges of education. The state colleges of
education were selected for this study because a similar study had been done by
Egunjobi and Oyewole (2006) in Federal colleges of education in Nigeria. In order
to evaluate the face and content validity of the questionnaire, the draft copies of
the questionnaire was given out to four chief librarians in the college system to
assist in evaluating content. The corrected and final questionnaire was sent out
with self address envelops in June 2009. However, other copies of the
questionnaire were sent out to the same audience in January 2010 when the
earlier ones were not returned. The items of the questionnaire addresses issues
such as the number of professionals and sub professionals in each library, the
qualification of the professionals, student and academic staff population, total
number of staff undergoing in-service training and the types of training. Out of the
thirty nine questionnaires forwarded by mail to the college librarians, only twenty
copies were returned by September ending 2010. This forms 51.2% of the
questionnaires sent out. The returned questionnaires were analyzed and used for
this study. Data was analyzed using simple percentage calculation.
College Libraries under Survey
Twenty College of Education Libraries were examined in this study. Their date of
establishment shows that all of them had being in existence for at least ten years.
This reveals that they are not new establishments and therefore they are suppose
to have attain a certain level of development in term of adequate facilities which
including adequate and quality library staff. Their date of establishment ranges
from 1970 to 1997 as shown in the table below:
Table I: List of Libraries Surveyed
College Year of Establishment
1Shehu Shagari COE Sokoto 1970
2Adeniran Ogunsanya COE, Oto-Ijanikin 1973
3Kwara State COE, Ilorin 1974
4COE Akwanga 1976
5COE Katsina-Ala 1977
6Kashim Ibrahim COE, Maiduguri 1977
7Kaduna State COE, Gidan Waya 1977
8COE, Ikere Ekiti 1978
9COE, Oro 1978
10 Ogun State COE, Omu 1978
11 COE, Ekiadolor 1980
12 COE, Agbor 1980
13 COE, Gindiri 1980
14 Nwafor Orizu COE, Nsugbe 1981
15 Oyo State COE, Oyo 1983
16 COE, Hong 1983
17 Isha Kaita COE, Dustin-Ma 1991
18 COE, Oju, Oturkpo 1991
19 Adamu Augie COE, Argungu 1996
20 FCT, COE, Zuba 1997
Findings and Discussion
The College librarians were asked to indicate the volume of their collection,
numbers of student and staff, number of librarians and number of library officers,
number of library sections headed by professionals and sub-professionals as well
as professional training opportunities available. Their responses to these issues
were analyzed to answer the research questions generated earlier in this study.
Table II: Number of Professionals and Sub-Professionals
College Library No of Prof %No of Sub.-Prof. % Total
1SS, COE, Sokoto 2 40 3 60 5
2AO, COE, Oto-Ijanikin 5 84 1 16 6
3KS COE, Ilorin 5 50 5 50 10
4COE, Akwanga 5 27 8 73 11
5COE, Katsina-Ala 5 19 11 81 16
6KI, COE, Maiduguri 5 56 4 44 9
7KS, COE, Gidan Waya 4 40 6 60 10
8COE, Ikere-Ekiti 7 58 5 42 12
9COE, Oro 3 50 3 50 6
10 COE, Omu 7 64 4 36 11
11 COE, Ekiadolor 3 60 2 40 5
12 COE, Agbor 8 44 10 56 18
13 COE, Gindiri 4 36 7 64 11
14 COE, Nsugbe 4 44 5 56 9
15 COE, Oyo 5 56 4 44 9
16 COE, Hong 4 57 3 43 7
17 COE, Dustin-Ma 4 29 10 71 14
18 COE, Oju, Oturkpo 5 83 1 17 6
19 COE, Argungu 3 30 7 70 10
20 COE, Zuba 3 100 - - 3
Total 91 47 99 53 190
Percentage of Professional and Sub-Professional Staff
Data collected revealed that in all the 20 colleges of education libraries surveyed,
91 (47.9%) librarians and 99 (52.1%) library officers were employed. This shows
that on the whole, there are more sub-professionals in these libraries. Further
examination showed that 8(40%) of the libraries have higher number of
professionals than sub-professionals. This is in sharp contrast to the findings of
Egunjobi and Oyewole (2006) which reported the reverse of this result. The study
also revealed that while the number of professionals in the libraries surveyed
range from a minimum of two to a maximum of eight persons, the sub-
professionals range from a minimum of one to a maximum of eleven persons. The
issue of more library officers (sub-professionals) than librarians in the state
colleges of education libraries may be as a result of shortage of fund to employ
more qualified staff as most Nigerian state governments are battling with economic
melt down which is in turn having effect on their educational institutions. A closer
look at the data also reveals that wherever the number of sub-professionals is
high, there are usually a lower number of professionals. This indicated that some
sub-professionals staffs may likely be assigned to perform professional duties due
to shortage of professional staff which may not be in the best interest of the library
and the library users. Moreover, going by the NCCE standard for the college
libraries, which stated that a college library shall operate with not less than three
professional staff and it shall maintain a staff ratio of 1:5. The interpretation is that
where there is 3 librarians there must be 15 paraprofessional librarians and the
total number of staff should be 20. Though, only 1(5%) of the libraries is operating
with less than three professional but non of the libraries is able to maintain the
recommended ratio. This shows that most of the college libraries are operating
with inadequate number of library staff. In fact only the College of Education Agbor
has the correct number of staff but not in the recommended ratio.
Librarians Ratio to Patrons Population and Collection Volumes
Out of the twenty colleges involved in this survey, only nineteen responded to this
aspect of the questionnaire by producing data on the total volume of their
collection and their student/academic staff population vis-à-vis the number of
librarians. This is represented in Table III.
Table III: Librarians Ratio to Collection and Population Served
College Coll in
vol Total Stu
Pop Total Acad
Staff Total Stu/ Acad
Staff Pop No of
Libns
Libns/Coll
Ratio
Libns/Staff
Students
Ratio
COE,
Sokoto 45559 4100 396 4496 2 1:22779 1:2248
COE,
Ekiadolor 37300 5706 140 5846 5 1:7460 1:1169
COE,
Agbor 35400 12500 350 12850 8 1:4425 1:1606
COE,
Gidanwaya 34000 6000 NS NS 4 1:8500 NS
COE, Ikere
Ekiti 30000 12000 320 12320 7 1:4285 1:1760
COE,
Maiduguri 27120 2500 150 2650 5 1:5424 1:530
COE,
Gindiri 24116 12224 217 12441 4 1:6029 1:3110
COE
Akwanga 23400 6000 400 6400 3 1:7800 1:2133
COE
KatsinaAla 23000 10000 560 10560 5 1:4600 1:2112
COE Ilorin 19225 5600 85 5685 5 1:3851 1:1137
COE
Dutsin-Ma 19000 7800 165 7965 4 1:4750 1:1991
COE, Omu 15237 15000 384 15384 7 1:2176 1:2197
COE Hong 13000 5250 129 5379 4 1:3250 1:1344
COE, Oro 11000 8000 NS NS 3 1:3666 NS
COE Oju 8914 9950 307 10257 5 1:1782 1:2051
COE
Argungu 8463 2165 150 2315 3 1:2821 1:771
COE Zuba 5090 NS 134 NS 3 1:1696 NS
COE
Nsugbe NS 5090 264 5354 4 NS 1:1338
COE, Oyo 20404 11000 315 11315 5 1:4080 1:2263
From the table above, while eighteen libraries provided information on total
collection in volumes and student population, seventeen provided information on
the academic staff population. The total number of students and academic staff is
taken to be the estimated total number of population served by the library. The
ratio of librarians to the volume of books collection in the college libraries range
from 1 librarian per 1338 volumes of books to 1 librarian per 22,779 volumes of
books. In the same vein, the population served by a librarian range from 530
persons to 3110 persons. Though there is no specific standard set by the
supervisory body in this regard but Agboola (1994) stated that the National
University Commission recommended the ratio of one librarian to two hundred full-
time equivalent students in the university libraries. Consequently, Arubayi (2009)
discovered that the computed lecturer /students ratio in state colleges of education
is 1:27 in 2002/2003 session. If this is so for lecturers, it is quite obvious that
having one librarian serving 530 students is inadequate while having one librarian
for a collection of about 22,779 volumes and 2,248 persons as in the case of
Shehu Shagari College of Education, Sokoto is rather highly inadequate. The
librarian will not be able to serve the population adequately and the students may
not be able to access important information sources and might be missing out vital
information that could have made them better equipped for the task ahead of
them.
Gender Distribution
Out of the total of 91 professionals (librarians) working in the twenty colleges
libraries surveyed, 63 are male while 28 are female. This is shown in the table
below;
Table IV: Gender Distribution of Librarians
Library Male % Female % Total
CEO Sokoto 2 - 2
COE, Ijanikin 1 4 5
COE Ilorin 4 1 5
COE Akwanga 5 - 5
COE Katsina-Ala 5 - 5
COE Maiduguri 3 2 5
COE Gidanwaya 3 1 4
COE Ikere Ekiti 6 1 7
COE Oro 3 - 3
COE Omu 4 3 7
COE Ekiadolor - 3 3
COE Agbor 3 5 8
COE Gindiri 3 1 4
COE Nsugbe 4 - 4
COE Oyo 2 3 5
COE Hong 2 2 4
COE Dustin-Ma 4 - 4
COE Oturkpo 4 1 5
COE Argungu 3 - 3
COE Zuba 2 1 3
Total 63 69.2 28 30.8 91
From Table IV, while 69.2% of the librarians are male, only 30.8% are female. This
indicates that librarianship in Nigerian Colleges of Education is dominated by men.
In fact, seven (35%) of the colleges surveyed do not have females among their
librarians at all and on the other hand, 1 (5%) of the colleges libraries do not have
a male among its librarians. This implies that there is gender imbalance in staffing
pattern of the state colleges of education in Nigeria. This result corroborates
Arubayi (2009) report that only 21% of the lecturers in State Colleges of Education
were female. In a library where only male librarians are employed it is likely that
the operations of the library might be too strict and this may not attract users. On
the other hand, women are known to be more passionate and through their
passion may be able to relate more effectively with their users. However, a library
would need the services of both the female librarians as well as that of the male
librarians to provide quality services to their users more over, this will make the
library more interesting.
Common Qualification held and Type of In-Service-training
Analysis of the qualifications held by librarians in the colleges indicated that 43
(47.3%) librarians have Bachelors Degree in library science, 46 (50.5%) held a
Masters Degree in librarianship (MLS) while 2(2.2%) held a Doctor of Philosophy
Degree. This is presented in Table V.
Table V: Qualifications Held by Librarians
Library BLS MLS PHD TOTAL
COE Sokoto 1 1 - 2
COE Ijanikin 2 3 - 5
COE,Ilorin 4 1 - 5
COE Akwanga 2 2 1 5
COE Katsina-Ala 4 1 - 5
COE Maiduguri 3 2 - 5
COE Gidanwaya 2 2 - 4
COE Ikere Ekiti 1 6 - 7
COE Oro 2 1 - 3
COE Omu 2 5 - 7
COE Ekiadolor 1 2 - 3
COE Agbor 5 3 - 8
COE Gindiri 2 2 - 4
COE Nsugbe - 4 - 4
COE Oyo 1 3 1 5
COE Hong 2 2 - 4
COE Dustin Ma 2 2 - 4
COE Oturkpo 2 3 - 5
COE Argungu 2 1 - 3
COE Zuba 3 - - 3
Total 43 46 2 91
It is quite commendable that majority 48( 52.7%) of the librarians in the tate
Colleges of Education had masters degree in librarianships. This may be due to
the fact that most Colleges of Education in Nigeria now require a minimum of
Postgraduate degrees for lectureship and since librarians are accorded the same
status with their teaching counter parts, it is compulsory for them too to acquire
Postgraduate degree. Further analysis of the data reveals that out of the 48
librarians that have masters’ degree, 25 (52.1%) have their background in
education, 10 (20.8%) have theirs in arts/humanitarian studies, 8 (16.7%) in social
science while only 5 (10.4%) have in sciences. However, 43 librarians that have
only first degree, obtained it in library science, this may be due to the fact that
most of them rise through the ranks and therefore have to go through diploma
program in librarianship which was made possible through in-service training. Only
two librarians according to the data have doctorate degree, however, there is the
tendency for more staff to progress on courses leading to the award of PhD in
librarianship because librarianship in Nigerian academic libraries keeps on
evolving.
Conclusion and Recommendations
The study reveals that the state colleges of education libraries in Nigeria employed
more paraprofessional librarians than the professionals, though none of them is
operating with less than three librarians which is the minimum professional staff
requirement for a college of education library, the number of librarians in most
libraries is grossly inadequate for the number of collection as well as population
served by such libraries. As a result, these librarians may be overstretched in
performing their duties and may not be able to perform at their optimal. Also the
gender gap appears to be too wide and worrisome as librarianship in state
colleges of education libraries in Nigeria is highly dominated by male librarians.
In term of quality, majority of the librarians have masters degree qualification,
however, there is the likelihood of an increase in the number of staff enrolling for
doctorate degree since librarianship in Nigerian academic libraries is assuming a
new dimension with the recent change in the status of the university librarians
which make it possible for them to become professors. The study also reveals that
many of the libraries staff are developing themselves through in-service training.
There is no gain saying that proper staffing is essential for effective library services
in state colleges of education library. It is therefore recommended that:
1. State colleges of education should try and run their libraries according the
NCCE standard i.e each library should not employed below 3 professional staff
and should maintain the ratio of 1professional staff to 5 para-professional staff.
2. The gender imbalance in the employment of male professional librarian should
be corrected by employing more female librarians.
3. Librarian having bachelor degree should be encouraged to proceed for their
master’s programmes. This is important as a master’s degree is now been use in
Nigeria an entry point to rise through the academic career ladder in the colleges of
education.
4. There is also the need to encourage the master’s degree holders to proceed on
PhD programme as this will help them stand shoulder to shoulder with their
teaching counterparts as academic staff, and also to expand the frontier of
librarianship in academic environment.
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Teacher 1:4-12
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... Based on the data analysis, it was revealed that Respect and honour accorded to parents, protection of the family name, maintenance of integrity, responsibility and ffairness were practiced by students to a little extent in Kogi east education zone of Kogi state. Items 12,14,16,18 and 20 were also rated by lecturers as 1.28 with standard deviation of 0.70, 1.31 with standard deviation of 0.56, 1.20 with standard deviation of 0.51, 1.41 with standard deviation of 0.61 and 1.42 with standard deviation of 0.58 respectively. Based on the analyzed data, it was revealed that Love of the family, Respect for people in the position of authority, Transparency, Accountability and Equity were practiced by students to a very little extent in colleges of education in Ankpa education zone of Kogi state. ...
... Moreover, there is a strong relationship between improving the quality of TVET at the university level through the efficient provision of equipment and facilities and the sustainable growth and development of Nigeria. These findings collaborate the views of Onifade and Onifade (2011),who opined that the various institutions that are charged with the responsibility to provide professional training for teachers, to achieve a nation's goals and, by extrapolation, the national goals are lacking the relevant and necessary facilities and equipment needed for effective training. This underscores the fact that if the necessary facilities and equipment are made available for TVET, its quality will be improved to occasion the nation's sustainable growth and development. ...
... Hence, the NCCE mandated all the Colleges of Education in Nigeria to have functional libraries in order to achieve their academic purposes. These Libraries have been charged by NCCE with the objectives of assisting their Colleges (Institutions) by providing learning and research information resources as well as providing various services to students in order to achieve the objectives of producing well molded teachers (higher-level skilled manpower/NCE students) in their chosen disciplines (Onifade & Onifade, 2011). Having use of library as a separate course underlines the importance attached to the teaching of use of library as a compulsory course to all students in the present 85 Colleges of Education in Nigeria made up of 21 Federal, 43 State, 1 Military, 19 Private and 1National Teacher Institute (NCCE, 2015). ...
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The study was carried out to survey NCE students’ perceptions on use of library course as an aid to their use of library resources in Colleges of Education in South-West Nigeria. The descriptive survey design was employed and four research questions guided the study. From a population of 60,481 students, a sample of 1,210 was drawn using the proportionate stratified sampling technique. Meanwhile, out of the 1,210 copies of the questionnaire distributed, 1,097 were fully completed (filled out) as retrieved and analyzed. It represents (90.66%) or approximately (91%) response rate and considered adequate because the standard and acceptable response rate for most studies is 60%. A questionnaire was the instrument used for data collection after validation by experts in the field, and pre-tested through Cronbach Alpha method that yielded 0.743 aggregate values. Complete data subsequently gathered from 1,097 copies of the questionnaire retrieved were analyzed by employing the statistical mean to answer the research questions and criterion mean placed at 2.50. Among the major findings of the study were: Students perceived use of library course as an aid to their use of all library resource categories examined in the study (that is, reference, reserve, circulation and serials resources). The study therefore recommends that students should be given increased opportunity to access “use of library course programme” as a veritable tool of enhancing their capacity for adequate use of reference resources among others in colleges of education in the region to ensure their effective integration into our 21st century society even after college life.
... Hence, the NCCE mandated all the Colleges of Education in Nigeria to have functional libraries in order to achieve their academic purposes. These Libraries have been charged by NCCE with the objectives of assisting their Colleges (Institutions) by providing learning and research information resources as well as providing various services to students in order to achieve the objectives of producing well molded teachers (higher-level skilled manpower/NCE students) in their chosen disciplines (Onifade & Onifade, 2011). Having use of library as a separate course underlines the importance attached to the teaching of use of library as a compulsory course to all students in the present 85 Colleges of Education in Nigeria made up of 21 Federal, 43 State, 1 Military, 19 Private and 1National Teacher Institute (NCCE, 2015). ...
Article
The study was carried out to survey NCE students’ perceptions on use of library course as an aid to their use of library resources in Colleges of Education in South-West Nigeria. The descriptive survey design was employed and four research questions guided the study. From a population of 60,481 students, a sample of 1,210 was drawn using the proportionate stratified sampling technique. Meanwhile, out of the 1,210 copies of the questionnaire distributed, 1,097 were fully completed (filled out) as retrieved and analyzed. It represents (90.66%) or approximately (91%) response rate and considered adequate because the standard and acceptable response rate for most studies is 60%. A questionnaire was the instrument used for data collection after validation by experts in the field, and pre-tested through Cronbach Alpha method that yielded 0.743 aggregate values. Complete data subsequently gathered from 1,097 copies of the questionnaire retrieved were analyzed by employing the statistical mean to answer the research questions and criterion mean placed at 2.50. Among the major findings of the study were: Students perceived use of library course as an aid to their use of all library resource categories examined in the study (that is, reference, reserve, circulation and serials resources). The study therefore recommends that students should be given increased opportunity to access “use of library course programme” as a veritable tool of enhancing their capacity for adequate use of reference resources among others in colleges of education in the region to ensure their effective integration into our 21st century society even after college life.
Article
This study was carried out to identify the assessment of selection and acquisition processes of book and other materials in College of Education Zuba Library. The research method used is survey method. The population of the study is staffs of the College of Education Zuba Library which the number twenty-eight (28) and there is no sampling since the population is manageable. Questionnaire was used to elicit data from twenty-eight (28) respondents. The data was analyzed using table, frequency and simple percentages. The following findings emerged from analysis of the data: lecturers select majority of the materials; also that the book selection and acquisition processes in College of Education Zuba Library faces a lot of problems; and non-book materials are not often acquired. Consequent on these findings, the following recommendations were made: that the various stakeholders should be involved in book selection and acquisition and non-book materials should be given topic priority.
Article
This paper examined Lecturer Quality, Quantity and Gender in Colleges of Education in Nigeria. To carryout this investigation, two research questions were raised to give direction to the study. The target population consisted of 56 Federal and State owned colleges of Education in Nigeria, during the 2002/2003 academic year. This study adopted the ex-post-facto research design. The data for the study were adapted from the statistical digest of colleges of education. The data were analysed using frequencies, percentages and means. Findings revealed that the quantity and quality of lecturers by sex in both Federal and State colleges of Education as bottom heavy. 4177 (50%) of lecturers in colleges of education were first degree holders. 3142 (38%) of these lecturers had professional first degree of which 753 (24%) were females. 2450 (29%) of these lecturers had post graduate professional degrees of which 538 (22%) were females lecturers with nonprofessional first degrees were 1035 (12%) with 148 (14%) as females. Those with nonprofessional postgraduate degrees were 1237(15%) and Ph.D holders were 465 (6%) with 97 (21%) as females. Findings revealed only about 1848 (12%) of lecturers in colleges of Education as females as compared to the male lecturers which was recorded as high as seven times the number of female lecturers. On lecturers quantity, findings revealed a total of 8329 lecturers in the 56 federal and state colleges of Education of which 184 (22.18%) were reported to be female lecturers. Finding revealed that the computed lecturer student ratio in Federal Colleges of Education was 1:28 while that of the state was 1:27. Based on the results and findings some recommendations are made.
Article
The importance of quality education in nation building cannot be over emphasized. There have been several calls on the educational managers on how to make the educational system to be more vibrant in the quality of its products after several quantity of mass failure and half baked products from our various educational institutions in the country. These over the years have generated a lot of debate and argument among Nigerians on the newspapers, radio and television programmed, including parent's religious bodies and non governmental organizations. They often expressed their concern about the manner in which the system is loosing its confidence as regards to the effective and efficient nature of the system. However, this paper therefore, discusses the role of educational managers in assuring quality in the Nigerian education system. Consequently, the paper looks at the concept of quality assurance and strategies for establishing quality assurance in education and finally it also examines Educational managers' role in assuring quality in Nigeria education system.
Article
Education in Nigeria is more of a public enterprise that has witnessed government complete and dynamic intervention and active participation (Federal Republic of Nigeria, 1981). It is the view of the formulated education policy in Nigeria to use education as a vehicle in achieving national development. Education being an instrument of change, in Nigeria education policy has been a product of evolution through series of historical developments. Improving the education is not only a goal in itself for a better quality of life but also its positive impact on the economic development of a country is far-reaching. The provision of education is a key element of a policy to promote broad-based economic growth. The main asset of the poor is clearly their labour and education improves the productivity and earnings of workers. Education is considered a major remedy for many problems faced by developing countries. For example, high fertility rates are adding to population pressures in several countries. From a global perspective, economic and social development is increasingly driven by the advancement and application of knowledge. Education, in general, and higher education in particular, are fundamental to the construction of a knowledge economy and society in all nations (World Bank, 1999). Yet the potential of higher education systems in developing countries to fulfil this responsibility is frequently thwarted by long-standing problems of finance, efficiency, equity, quality and governance. As a result, developing economies cannot be said to be reaping the benefits of a knowledge economy. It, therefore, become imperative with the aid of the Earnings Model developed by Mincer (1974) which is founded on the Theory of Investment in Human Capital, as well as the model by Moretti (2002) for social returns to education, to assess the development impact of higher education in Nigeria with a view to establishing the link between Nigeria’s higher educational system and her economic growth, as well as explicating how Nigeria can participate in the global knowledge economy. The result also reveals that a well educated labour force possessed a positive and significant impact on economic growth through factor accumulation and on the evolution of total factor productivity. Also, the amount of government expenditure on education significantly influences output per worker growth.
Staffing Needs and Requirements for Effective Library Services in Academic Libraries
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