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DEPISA Monograph no.2 ISBN 978-0-9923846-0-9
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Article
In this paper, an objective concept analysis was undertaken to examine the attributes, characteristics and uses of the concept of empowerment A review of the literature and selected empirical referents indicated that empowerment is a complex and multi-dimensional concept Within a nursing context, empowerment can be conceptualized as a composite of (a) attributes that relate to the client, (b) attributes that relate to the nurse, and (c) attributes that belong to both the client and the nurse In a broad sense, empowerment is a process of helping people to assert control over the factors which affect their lives This process encompasses both the individual responsibility in health care and the broader institutional, organizational or societal responsibilities in enabling people to assume responsibility for their own health. Antecedents to and consequences of empowerment, from a nursing perspective, are presented. To adopt truly an empowerment model in nursing, a radical paradigm shift is needed. The final conclusion is that this concept has great utility for nursing practice, education, administration and research
Article
As a result of advances in scientific knowledge and technology, the number of children living with chronic illness is ever increasing The burden of responsibility for the care of these children falls increasingly on the involved parents and, particularly, on mothers In spite of the challenges that chronic childhood illness presents, many families are able to adapt to their situation and develop a sense of control over their lives A sense of control has been associated with the notion of empowerment Following a theoretical analysis, empowerment was conceptualized as a social process of recognizing, promoting and enhancing people's abilities to meet their own needs, solve their own problems, and mobilize the necessary resources in order to feel in control of their own lives To understand the concept of empowerment from an empirical perspective, a fieldwork study was undertaken to describe the process of empowerment as it pertains to mothers of chronically ill children This paper presents the process of empowerment that occurred in these mothers Four components of the process of empowerment emerged discovering reality, critical reflection, taking charge, and holding on As a result of the study, empowerment was reconceptualized as largely a personal process in which individuals developed and employed the necessary knowledge, competence and confidence for making their voices heard Participatory competence — the ability to be heard by those in power - was the outcome of this process Although the unique finding in this study suggests that the process of empowerment was largely mtrapersonal, there was a relational element in the process Clearly, the intrapersonal and interpersonal processes of empowerment are intertwined
Article
The concept of empowerment is one which is often invoked in discussions over the nature of nursing practice in a range of health and welfare services. A short excursion through the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature reveals that over the last 10 years 378 papers are identified which list empowerment as one of the topics discussed. In 1993, the number is 55. These papers cover a diverse range of health related issues: health promotion and HIV; breast feeding; mental health; management and leadership; change, training and education; feminism and women's issues; sexual abuse and violence; advocacy and working with immigrants; professionalism; and nursing theory. However, few of these papers discuss the relationship between empowerment and the notion of power itself. This gives rise to particular problems for nursing practice, for without a clear conceptualization of what is meant by power it is difficult to convincingly argue that one form of practice is more or less empowering than another. Alternatively, this dilemma may be stated in the following question: how do we work to empower others when we have no clear notion of what power is? This paper demonstrates that the concept of power demands a very specific consideration. In order to illustrate this it briefly identifies problems within two models of power which are drawn upon in nursing. It also demonstrates the way in which the work of Michel Foucault can be drawn upon to inform nursing in the analysis of the relationship between power and health.
Article
As a result of advances in scientific knowledge and technology, the number of children living with chronic illness is ever increasing. The burden of responsibility for the care of these children falls increasingly on the involved parents and, particularly, on mothers. In spite of the challenges that chronic childhood illness presents, many families are able to adapt to their situation and develop a sense of control over their lives. A sense of control has been associated with the notion of empowerment. Following a theoretical analysis, empowerment was conceptualized as a social process of recognizing, promoting and enhancing people's abilities to meet their own needs, solve their own problems, and mobilize the necessary resources in order to feel in control of their own lives. To understand the concept of empowerment from an empirical perspective, a fieldwork study was undertaken to describe the process of empowerment as it pertains to mothers of chronically ill children. This paper presents the process of empowerment that occurred in these mothers. Four components of the process of empowerment emerged: discovering reality, critical reflection, taking charge, and holding on. As a result of the study, empowerment was reconceptualized as largely a personal process in which individuals developed and employed the necessary knowledge, competence and confidence for making their voices heard. Participatory competence--the ability to be heard by those in power--was the outcome of this process. Although the unique finding in this study suggests that the process of empowerment was largely intrapersonal, there was a relational element in the process. Clearly, the intrapersonal and interpersonal processes of empowerment are intertwined.
Article
This paper is an analysis of the concept of empowerment and its use in nursing practice, education, research and health promotion. The paper adopts an eclectic approach to concept analysis, incorporating the methods advocated by Walker & Avant and Rodgers. The concept is analysed and a theoretical definition given. Defining attributes, related concepts, antecedents and consequences of empowerment are proposed and a model case presented. The analysis demonstrates that empowerment is: a helping process; a partnership valuing self and others; mutual decision making; and freedom to make choices and accept responsibility. Implications for practice conclude the paper.
Article
What we now think of as the field of health promotion has grown rapidly in the last 15 years, mainly out of the field of health education. With this expansion, has come the need to develop education and training programmes for current and future health promotion practitioners.
General Assembly. 55'h Session United Nations Millennium Declaration from, www.un.org/millennium/declaration/ares552e.pdf World Health Organization The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion
United Nations. (2000). General Assembly. 55'h Session. United Nations Millennium Declaration. Retrieved July 1. 2012 from, www.un.org/millennium/declaration/ares552e.pdf World Health Organization. (1986). The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. Ottawa:
Empowerment Takes More than a Minute
  • B H Kenneth
  • J P Carlos
  • A Randolph
Kenneth, B. H., Carlos, J. P., & Randolph A. (1996). Empowerment Takes More than a Minute. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler.
Teaching health promotion based on the empowerment concept
  • N Tassniyom
Tassniyom, N. (2011). Teaching health promotion based on the empowerment concept. Thai Journal of Nursing Council, 267. 17-29. (Special issue).