Conference Paper

Earthquake Emergencies Management by Means of Semantic-Based Internet of Things

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Abstract

Semantic technologies can play a key role in representing, storing, interconnecting, searching, and organizing information generated/consumed by things. In order to evaluate its feasibility, this paper presents a set of reasoning mechanisms based on an IoT ontology to be applied in an emergency management scenario. The scenario presented in this paper consists in the earthquake emergency management.

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... Wayfinding systems are generally used to help people during fire emergencies. Although fire and earthquake produce different scenarios and have different time spread during the emergency, the involved wayfinding processes can be represented in a very similar way (Gelenbe & Wu, 2012;Onorati et al., 2014), especially from an ontological point of view (Taccari, Bernardini, Spalazzi, D'Orazio, & Smari, 2014). ...
... Therefore, wayfinding solutions should be encouraged also for outdoor earthquake evacuation ( Sato et al., 2014;Taccari et al., 2014). Because emergency wayfinding in outdoor scenario is a quite recent field and it is still being developed, only few studies involve this issue. ...
... Evaluation techniques mainly take advantage of evacuation simulators (Kinugasa & Nakatani, 2011; Shahabi and Wilson (2014), Kinugasa and Nakatani (2011) Mishima, Miyamoto, Taguchi, & Kitagawa, 2014), but real experiments are also performed ( Ishikawa et al., 2008). Finally, a limited number of studies offer methods for pedestrians' safe evacuation at urban scale (Shahabi & Wilson, 2014;Shimura & Yamamoto, 2014) by also involving post-earthquake evacuation (Kinugasa & Nakatani, 2011) and defining the system from an ontological point of view ( Taccari et al., 2014). Examples of validations of these tools by means of simulators have been also offered ( Sato et al., 2014). ...
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In earthquake disasters, the leading causes of death are directly related both to build collapses and fatalities during the following evacuation phase. Allowing people to autonomously gain safe areas and assembly points should be the basis for reducing human losses in urban systems. However, some important environmental and behavioural factors (e.g. vulnerability of buildings, compact urban fabric, cascade effects, presence of people unfamiliar with the urban layout, absence of information on evacuation paths) can hinder this ‘self-help’-based evacuation process. This issue is really important in historical centres where evacuees suffer a combination of unfavourable conditions to safely escape. This paper concerns a non-invasive solution for guiding people along probable safe evacuation routes in earthquake emergency. The proposed Seismic Pedestrians' Evacuation Dynamic Guidance Expert System (SpeedGuides) considers the influence of the main environmental and behavioural safety factors for evacuees (i.e. street vulnerability, street blockages probability, crowding conditions along paths, presence of mortal dangers, visibility conditions) and combines them in a safety index through the Multi-criteria techniques application. SpeedGuides dynamically collects safety factor data during the time and suggests the possible safest path to the nearest secure zone according to the Dijkstra's algorithm approach. SpeedGuides is an easy-to-use model proposed for application on personal devices (e.g. smartphone) that, taking advantage of different expert methods, allows evacuees to simple enhance their safety. A first effectiveness evaluation of SpeedGuides is provided through an earthquake pedestrians' evacuation simulator in a significant case study. The evacuee performances (with and without the proposed guidance tool) are compared and discussed. Results demonstrate how individuals' safety levels are increased when evacuees use SpeedGuides.
... Other works in the literature use ontology-based technologies to model the seismic domain too, building information systems on seismology [22], also focusing on the earthquake emergency evaluation and response domain [5], [23]. ...
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PEAR: Personal Evacuation And Rescue system
  • C J Lin
  • Y Tseng
An iot ontology for earthquake emergency evaluation and response
  • L Spalazzi
  • G Taccari
  • A Bernardini