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Hassan ibn Thabit, a true Mukhadram: A study of the Ghassanid odes of Hassan ibn Thabit

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As it is suggested and recommended in the first part of a previous paper that carries the same title, this paper is a continuous effort not to claim to be wide-ranging in mastering a poetic piece as one sort of expressive manuscript in Arabic but an impartial effort through analytical assessment of a poem. The study is limited to a few selected verses of Hassan ibn Thabit poem named ‘Al Alef rhymed (????? ?????).’ It is a representative of the Arabic tongue and its magnificence. It is a piece of poetry that cannot be examined and scrutinized in a short paper like this.The study focuses, with analysis, on six verse lines – 17/22 – of Hassan ibn Thabit's poem mentioned above. It employs an analytical and critical method, makes an effort to illustrate the inspiration of Arabic poetry as a means of the tongue and its grandeur and glory. The study initiates with an introduction raising the importance of Arabic classical poetic tongue. Then it goes go forward to give a picture of Hassan ibn Thabit as a man and a poet. The researcher, then, shifts to the foremost segment of the study, attempting to bring an interpretation to some selected verses of Hassan’s above-mentioned long poem. The paper reaches its conclusion by a concise discussion and recommendatory afterword.
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Article
As it is suggested and recommended in the first part of a previous paper that carries the same title, this paper is a continuous effort not to claim to be wide-ranging in mastering a poetic piece as one sort of expressive manuscript in Arabic but an impartial effort through analytical assessment of a poem. The study is limited to a few selected verses of Hassan ibn Thabit poem named ‘Al Alef rhymed ( قافية الألف ).’ It is a representative of the Arabic tongue and its magnificence. It is a piece of poetry that cannot be examined and scrutinized in a short paper like this. The study focuses, with analysis, on six verse lines – 17/22 – of Hassan ibn Thabit's poem mentioned above. It employs an analytical and critical method, makes an effort to illustrate the inspiration of Arabic poetry as a means of the tongue and its grandeur and glory. The study initiates with an introduction raising the importance of Arabic classical poetic tongue. Then it goes go forward to give a picture of Hassan ibn Thabit as a man and a poet. The researcher, then, shifts to the foremost segment of the study, attempting to bring an interpretation to some selected verses of Hassan’s above-mentioned long poem. The paper reaches its conclusion by a concise discussion and recommendatory afterword.
Article
This article suggests a rereading of Arabic poetry through a critical lens that builds on T. S. Eliot's notion of continuity underpinning the nexus between traditional and the individual talent. Through analyzing the use of continuity in the pre/early-Islamic qaṣīda, as manifested in the conventional motif of nasīb (the amatory prelude), the article attempts to wed Western critical theory and premodern Arab poetic praxis. Drawing on the notion of continuity identified by Eliot, this article approaches the works of Mukhaḍram poets, whose lives spanned the pre-Islamic and early Islamic-eras, in order to elucidate their attempt to create a balanced nexus between the old Jāhilī tradition and the new Islamic culture. Following Eliot's concept of tradition, the article examines the contours of continuity in the early Arabic qaṣīda, focusing especially on the amatory prelude or nasīb1 as a condensed metaphorical garb that represents the spirit of a new age without sacrificing established norms. The article thus focuses on the tension between the conventional and the creative that marks this transitional period, as represented by Mukhaḍram poets in their attempt to set a balance between their creative talents and the new moral code enacted by the newly introduced faith. Here, the Mukhaḍram poets, represented in the article by Ḥassān ibn Thābit, the Prophet Muḥammad's panegyrist, offer an excellent example of this hybridist reworking of an established poetic canon. It is thus claimed that such reworking resulted in new metaphors, which encapsulated both traditional motifs and creative symbols. In this sense, Mukhaḍram poetry imbued pristine individual talent with a conscious sense of tradition that ensured the “wholesome continuity” of universal cultural values.
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ABSTRACT: Hassan ibn (son of) Thabit is one of the greatest poets who lived within two distinguished ages of the Arabic nations in Arabia, the pre-Islamic period and the Islamic period. He presented graceful pictures of Arabs before Islam and after Islam. In this literary paper, the investigator attempts to probe the depth of the Arabic poetry of Hassan ibn Thabit as an instance of the magnitude of Arabic poetic tongue. The poet Hassan ibn Thabit deserves a literary investigation paying attentiveness mostly to his poetry as a tradition and legacy of the classical Arabic poetic language. In dealing with one of the famous poems of Ibn Thabit, the paper operates the critical-analytical method. It starts with a succinct introduction about Arabic poetry then the paper progresses to illuminate Arabs and Arabic poetic tongue. Subsequently, the researcher goes to shed light on the poet, Hassan ibn Thabit as a poet of an unusual Arabic language. After that, it goes on to focus more with analysis and wasf (description) on the first sixteen verse lines of Hassan ibn Thabit's renowned poem known as the Alef rhymed (قافية الألف). This part is the central division of the study in which it attempts to verify via the poetry of Hassan Ibn Thabit. The paper is ended with a short conclusion.
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Arabs have traditionally considered classical Arabic poetry, together with the Qur'an, as one of their supreme cultural accomplishments. Taking a comparatist approach, Jaroslav Stetkevych attempts in this book to integrate the classical Arabic lyric into an enlarged understanding of lyric poetry as a genre. Stetkevych concentrates on the "places of lost bliss" that furnish the dominant motif in the lyric-elegiac opening section (nasib) of the classic Arab code, or qusidah. In defining the Arabic lyrical genre, he shows how pre-Islamic lamentations over abandoned campsites evolved, in Arabo-Islamic mystical poetry, into expressions of spiritual nostalgia. Stetkevych also draws intriguing parallels between the highlands of Najd in Arabic poetry and Arcadia in the European tradition. He concludes by exploring the degree to which the pastoral-paradisiacal archetype of the nasib pervades Arabic literary perception, from the pre-Islamic ode through the Thousand and One Nights and later texts. Enhanced by Stetkevych's sensitive translations of all the Arabic texts discussed, The Zephyrs of Najd brings the classical Arabic ode fully into the purview of contemporary literary and critical discourse.
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As an initial contribution to the study of the thematics of early Arabic poetry, this dissertation traces the development of the theme of old age from the pre-Islamic period (about A.D. 500) until the end of the ninth century. The first chapter demonstrates how the evocation of the spread of hoariness, as a signal for the aged poet to renounce love and youthful levity or for women to reject the aged poet, comes in the opening lines of the pre-Islamic qas(')ida or in the context of the nas(')ib (erotic prelude) to serve to emphasize the opposition of gray old age to the poet's erotic interest and to draw a sharp contrast between the pleasant past and the lonely present. This chapter also shows how the lament for the passing of youth is developed by some pre-Islamic poets to function as a distinct prelude theme that occasionally replaces the nas(')ib altogether or dominates its discussion. Taking the treatment of old age and lost youth in pre-Islamic poetry as a point of departure for comparison and contrast, the contribution of each period of Arabic poetry to the development of the subject of age is examined to two main levels: the opposition of gray old age to the poet's interest in youthful love and women as a thematic component of the nas(')ib, and the lament for youth as a principal prelude theme. In four chapters following the first, it is explained in detail how these two thematic aspects (gray old age and the lament for youth) are taken up by the poets of the subseqent periods of Arabic poetry, and how each period presents a steady increase in the frequency, extent and expressive range of both aspects until the discussion of gray old age and lost youth finally reaches the highest level of its development at the hand of Ibn al-Rum(')i who wrote twelve preludes on age, of which two comprise seventy lines each, presenting the most extended treatment of this theme in the history of Arabic poetry up to modern times. DISSERTATION (PH.D.)--THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Dissertation Abstracts International,
The poet's memories with the Ghassānids (v. 16-20) a. Panel 1: Drinking in the tavern
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I. Tableau 8: The poet's memories with the Ghassānids (v. 16-20) a. Panel 1: Drinking in the tavern, sophisticated lifestyle (v. 16-7)
He contends that the entire second version is a "recasting" of the earlier poem, probably composed by a Syrian poet who lived not long after H assān. they had gathered it [saffron
  • Conrad See Lawrence
For Conrad's translation and analysis of this poem, see Lawrence Conrad, "Epidemic Disease in Central Syria in the Late Sixth Century, Some new insights from the verse of H assān ibn Thābit" Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies 18 (1994): 29-51. Conrad argues that the version of the poem in Kitāb al-aghānī is a distinct version composed by a different poet. He contends that the entire second version is a "recasting" of the earlier poem, probably composed by a Syrian poet who lived not long after H assān. they had gathered it [saffron]." 34 In another interpretation, the verb is altered to read yah tabīn, meaning "they put on." Relying on this reading, saffron is the color of the robes, not what is being gathered. 35 Despite this ambiguity, what the verse conveys clearly is the luxurious clothing worn by the maidens. The girls are described as being clothed in majāsid, plural of mijsad, luxurious robes worn only by wealthy women. 36
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