The Staling and Texture of Bread Made Using the Yudane Dough Method

ArticleinFood Science and Technology Research 20(5):1071-1078 · September 2014with 1,732 Reads
Abstract
White breads with Yudane dough (Yudane bread) were made from commercial hard flour by the no first fermentation method. Yudane dough was prepared by mixing boiling water and flour at a ratio of 1:1. The dough at 20 and 40% (w/w, flour base) was added to the total bread dough. In the Yudane bread making method, an extended final proof, lower dough gas retention and gassing power, as well as specific loaf volume were observed compared to conventional bread making (control) without Yudane dough. Also, the moisture content of the Yudane breads increased with increasing water absorption for bread making. The total and reducing saccharide and maltose contents in the water-soluble fraction of Yudane bread also increased with the volume of added Yudane dough. The Yudane breads were very soft just after baking, and the staling (temporal changes in hardness) and starch retrogradation of the breads were somewhat reduced compared to the control. Further, the breads showed generally larger cohesiveness, i.e., the index of bread elasticity. Kinetic analysis indicated reduced bread staling and starch retrogradation rates compared to control. The data showed that the slow staling and unique texture of the Yudane breads were mainly due to the high moisture content, saccharide contents, and flour amylases-modification of swollen and gelatinized starch in the breads, which was related to the higher water absorption and starch swelling and gelatinization levels of the added Yudane dough.
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