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A review of Dyrosaurus phosphaticus (Thomas, 1893) (Mesoeucrocodylia; Dyrosauridae) from the Lower Eocene of North Africa.

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... This shelf appears to have articulated with the dorsal processes of the palatine, completely enclosing the nasopharyngeal ducts. The vomer forms the ventral surface of the sulcus septalis, unlike in other crocodyliforms (e.g., Dyrosaurus phosphaticus; Jouve, 2005). ...
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