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Abstract

The heritage aspect is a crucial part of a luxury brand as it has to appear both perfectly modern to the society of the day and at the same time laden with history. Heritage adds the association of depth, authenticity and credibility to the brand’s perceived value and can result in an intensified brand loyalty and the willingness to accept higher prices. Incorporating relevant theoretical and empirical findings, the aim of the present study is to examine the antecedents and outcomes of luxury value and brand heritage as perceived by consumers and effects resulting on brand strength. Based on a structural modeling approach, results reveal the most important effects of the perceived luxury and heritage of a brand on consumer perceived value in terms of the customer’s economic, functional, affective, and social evaluation of a brand and its related effects on the affective, cognitive and intentional brand strength.

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... Then, in a fourth case study, Wiedmann et al., (2012) focused on the market for luxury goods more into detail. Most consumers of luxury brands are aware of the origin of a brand, so especially for luxury brands the heritage aspect seems to be a crucial part of their brand association network as luxury brands have to be both modern to the society and time laden with history (Kapferer and Bastien, 2009). ...
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