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A REVIEW ON POTENTIAL BENEFITS OF HYPERTHERMIA IN THE TREATMENT OF CANCER

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Hyperthermia treatment is exposing the body to supra normal temperature which is elevated to kill the cancerous cells without damaging the healthy tissues. Hyperthermia is a cancer treatment technique in which the temperature of the affected part of the body is slightly raised (41.5 to 430C / 104 -113 0F) to damage and kill cancer cells or to make cancer cells more susceptible to radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Hyperthermia could be considered as the forth pillar for the treatment of cancer in addition to radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. Treatment strategy involving hyperthermia combined with radiotherapy/ biotherapy/ chemotherapy/ surgical intervention results in higher response rates, improved tumor control, better palliative effects and better overall survival rates.
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... In clinical applications, heat is typically generated by applying an alternating magnetic field to the magnetic materials that were previously implanted or injected into the tumor site in order to increase and maintain the local temperature slightly above 40 • C, which our GCFe glass-ceramics were able to show good performance (Fig. 2c). Malignant cells are then selectively killed as heat is slowly dissipated in cancerous tissues due to the lack of a wellorganized vascular network [50]. ...
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