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Characterization and valorization of shading solar devices in the context of solar building design : experimental analysis and modelling proposals

Authors:
  • Nobatek/INEF4, France

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During the design process of a building, the energetic modelling of the solar envelop is often imprecise. The purpose of the present work is the detailed description of solar shading devices that induce a chimney effect such as claddings or blinds, which would allow their promotion in order to meet the industrial needs of the sector. An experimental platform - south facing wall with a shading solar device that define an air gap - has been set up and allow the measurement of temperatures, air flows in the ventilated air gap, and the incident solar radiation. Two different wooden claddings, one type of blinds and one type of expanded metal were considered.A 1D model has been developed by considering precisely the heat transfers in the system. Three families of convection model are identified, presented and integrated in the overall model. The description of the airflow in the air gap is chosen from analysis of the experimental results.A simplified model that allows the integration of such solar shading devices in a building simulation platform has been developed; it is based on the parameterization of external solicitations as function of the shading device properties. The calculation method of the solar factor is presented. The intrinsic nature of the solar factor is then discussed using sensibility analysis.
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