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The role of the liberalization of trade in services in the economic development: the case of financial services

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Abstract

In the framework of a work on the developing countries, this thesis analyzes the effects of liberalization of financial services on their economic development. The theory predicts positive effects of liberalization on the economies. This study takes part in it by exploring new forms of correlation between liberalization and economic development. The method used in our research is to treat liberalization of trade in services by three of its aspects. These are the theoretical aspect, the legal aspect and the empirical aspect.

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