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Accepting roles created for us: The ethics of reciprocity

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Abstract

Grounded in theories of feminist research practices and in two empirical studies we conducted separately, our argument is that seeing reciprocity as a context-based process of definition and re-definition of the relationship between participants and researcher helps us understand how research projects can benefit participants in ways that they desire.

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... A community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach was selected for this study (Doberneck et al., 2010;Israel et al., 1998). CBPR methodologies provides a direct reciprocal partnership between academic researchers and community stakeholders that effectively builds a stronger capacity for change within the community while providing implications from research that are directly applicable to wider audiences (Israel et al., 2010;Powell & Takayoshi, 2003). CPBR allows for further empowerment of people and groups by enhancing their voices and power in society, and facilitating further social change (Tremblay et al., 2017). ...
... During the first CBPR phase, the research team connected with a local nonprofit organization to discuss their concerns and issues regarding sexual- ity education for adults with IDD. Through meetings, members of this organization were able to specify their concerns and begin to identify potential areas in which action needed to be taken (Powell & Takayoshi, 2003). During this phase, the research team learned more about the organization, specifically their sexuality education program, and they discussed areas in which they could collaborate. ...
... Due to the directly applicable nature of the CBPR study design (Powell & Takayoshi, 2003), the SHARE program has already used the results to create a sequential model for their program. In this model, adults must first take SHARE 1, which focuses on individual sexual health using didactic instruction and group education practices. ...
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This study used a community-based participatory research approach to examine what adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) view as important topics in sexuality education. A thematic analysis was conducted on questions written by adults with IDD regarding sexuality after attending a sexuality education group. Results were checked for accuracy using a community focus group. Findings provide direct implications for community-based sexuality education programs for adults with IDD, demonstrating the need for mentoring regarding authentic relationship experiences as well as developmentally appropriate sexual health information. Programs need to focus on helping adults with IDD navigate these interpersonal experiences. This study also demonstrates the importance of including the voices of adults with IDD in research in order to ensure its applicability and acceptability.
... Reciprocity is essential to co-produced research. 41 Funders of global health research need to reconsider the rewards and impact of co-production. 37 42 Communities which devote their time, effort, and knowledge to shaping a research study should determine what benefits they receive and should be empowered by the processes. ...
... 1. Deciding whether and how to disseminate the digital stories 2. The day of the exhibitionary encounter: Showcasing the stories at the Peace in the Park event (see Figure 1) Resisting the common participatory impulse to organize around consensus, we demonstrate that participatory curation involves recognizing and navigating tensions that surface in the process (Fine & Torre, 2004;Powell & Takayoshi, 2003). ...
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What does curation involve when guided by feminist, community-based participatory methodologies aimed toward social change? This article highlights that curation is a critically important intermediary rhetorical action in-and-of-itself when working with marginalized groups in a participatory action project. Participatory curation—a process of eliciting, shaping, and sharing creative-rhetorical works with members of a participatory action research (PAR) project—involves navigating tensions while striving to ensure that differently positioned participants have opportunities to voice their perspectives on when, if, and how to exhibit/disseminate the co-created knowledge. This web-text offers a deeper understanding of the praxis of participatory curation as participatory action research project. Drawing on a feminist PAR project to support marginalized youth in creating and presenting digital stories about critical issues impacting their communities, we argue that participatory curation involves creating a sense of “we” by prompting interpersonal moments of discovery and by confronting the commonplaces and structures that would immediately authorize those with privilege to decide when, if, and how to disseminate or make public collaborative creative-rhetorical works.
... Our understanding of power relations in research settings is crucially informed by experiences and analyses of gendered identity practices in contemporary societies. Relationship-building is framed within a power dynamic, and work over the past decade has documented the reciprocal relationship where both researcher and researched learn from one another and have a voice in the study (Pini & Peace, 2014;Powell & Takayoshi, 2003;Riach, 2009). More in line with activist research, reciprocity in researcher-participant interaction can be challenging to foster and remains difficult to define. ...
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PurposeTo understand how research-participant relationships are formed in research settings through experiences and analyses of content-specific gendered identity practices. Methodology/approachI draw upon a school-based ethnographically informed study exploring the construction of masculinities among white working-class boys in three schools in South London, United Kingdom between 2009 and 2011. To access participants’ perceptions, I used a methodology of observation, focus groups, semi-structured interviews and visual methods. FindingsThemes of gendered embodiment, physicality and performance play a part in the formation of relationships in this study. Furthermore, such themes play a role – to varying degrees – in researcher-participant relationship-building. In understanding relationship-building practices, I make connections to my own reflexivity accounting for the multifaceted nature of identities, lifestyles and perspectives present in researcher-participant interaction. Originality/valueThroughout the fieldwork, constructs of gender, nationality and class all contributed to how relationships were built. In navigating the power relations innate to all relationship-building, I discuss how I capitalised on my outsider status in terms of nationality to neutralise certain elements of class and gender that were normative to my participants, but, simultaneously, draw upon my insider status in terms of knowledge of the locale, humour and clothing which contributed greatly to how the relationships were constructed and maintained.
... As researchers we have much to gain from the work we do with community partners (Cushman, 1998). It is our responsibility, through "selfcritical, conscious navigation" (Cushman, 1996, p. 16) to define and redefine our relationships with partners and to ask and assess whether they are getting something satisfactory out of the interaction (Powell & Takayoshi, 2003). ...
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