ArticlePDF AvailableLiterature Review

Hair Growth: Focus on Herbal Therapeutic Agent

Authors:
  • Center Council of Research in Homeopathy, New Delhi, India
  • Drugs testing laboratory avam anusandhan kendra
  • Berlin-Chemie AG

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This review presents an overview on plants identified to possess hair growth activity in various ethno-botanical studies and surveys of tradition medicinal plants. It also highlights the developments in hair rejuvenation strategies from 1926 till-date and reviews the potential of herbal drugs as safer and effective alternatives. There are various causes for hair loss and the phenomenon is still not fully understood. The treatments offered include both natural or synthetic products to treat the condition of hair loss (alopecia), nonetheless natural products are continuously gaining popularity mainly due to their fewer side effects and better formulation strategies for natural product extracts. Plants have been widely used for hair growth promotion since ancient times as reported in Ayurveda, Chinese and Unani systems of medicine. This review covers information about different herbs and herbal formulation that are believed to be able to reduce the rate of hair loss and at the same time stimulate new hair growth. A focus is placed on their mechanism of action and the review also covers various isolated phytoconstituents possessing hair growth promoting effect.
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... Oil from C. colocynthis is used to treat hair pigmentation and hair fall by different ethnic communities. The herbal product formulated by different herbal extracts such as Cuscuta reflexa, E. alba and C. colocynthis has also been used to promote the hair growth (Patel, et al., 2015). The plant is enriched with different phytochemicals such as cucurbitacin E, elatericin B and dihydroelatericin B (Lavie et al., 1964). ...
... Liquiritia officinarum and 5-40% Ginkgo biloba extracts proved to be advantageous in the treatment of hair ailments. Likewise, Ginkgo and Stearyl glycyrrhetinate extract cooperatively increase the growth of hair and stop hair fall (Patel et al., 2015). Leaf extract of G. biloba has the ability to accelerate growth of hair again through cell multiplication and programmed-cell death (Kobayashi et al., 1993). ...
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The primary aim of this study is to access the salient herbal plants with the active constituent of potentially anti-hair fall activities. It also presents the various reasons behind hair loss ailments. As part of this study, a focus is placed on active phytochemicals within these medicinal plants or natural products in terms of various hair fall disease treatments. As natural products have a beneficial effect to minimize hair loss and have promoted the potential for new hair growth, it presents the medicinal values of natural plants in reference to safety and effectiveness for health.
... erefore, the development of new ways to enhance hair growth and prevent hair loss is urgently needed in the hair care industry [35,36]. Recently, many herbal topical formulations are available on the market, with many advantages such as natural substances, high safety, low-cost, patient compliance, the concept of treatment plus recuperation, and multi-target onset for hair growth promotion or hair loss treatment [35,37,38]. ...
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