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Case Report - Bilateral facial squamous cell carcinoma in an 18-month-old girl with xeroderma pigmentosum

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Abstract

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin usually occurs in older patients and commonly develops from actinic keratosis. Patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are highly sensitive to ultraviolet radiation and prone to develop multiple skin malignancies and can acquire SCC at an early age. We report an 18-month-old girl with XP who presented clinically because of a bilateral facial skin mass that was biopsied and found to be SCC. To our knowledge, the case we describe represents the youngest XP patient to have developed facial SCC.

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Bilateral facial squamous cell carcinoma References 1 Collagenolytic (necrobiotic) granulomas: part II—the 'red' granulomas
  • Alymlahi
Alymlahi et al: Bilateral facial squamous cell carcinoma References 1. Lynch JM, Barrett TL. Collagenolytic (necrobiotic) granulomas: part II—the 'red' granulomas. J Cutan Pathol 2004;31:409-18.
Clinical and molecular characteristics of xeroderma pigmentosum
  • M Ichihashi
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  • M Ueda
Ichihashi M, Kondo M, Ueda M. Clinical and molecular characteristics of xeroderma pigmentosum. J Pediatr Dermatol 1994;13:43-9.