Conference PaperPDF Available

Ecosystem-based design rules for sand extraction sites

Authors:
  • Ministerie van Landbouw natuur en voedselkwaliteit

Abstract and Figures

The demand for marine sand in the Netherlands and globally is still increasing. The Dutch authorities promote sand extraction depths deeper than 2 m for projects over 10 million m3 of sand, to maintain sufficient supply and to decrease the surface area of impact. The ecological effects of deep sand extraction, however, are still largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated short-term effects of deep sand extraction (20 – 24 m) and compared these with other case studies such as, common shallow sand extraction on the Dutch Continental Shelf (2 m) and an 8-m deepened shipping lane. For intercomparison between case studies we applied the tide-averaged bed shear stress as a generic proxy for changed environmental conditions and related ecological effects. Bed shear stress can be estimated using a two-dimensional quadratic friction law or a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. We developed ecosystem-based design rules based on two-dimensional tide-averaged bed shear stress values and ecological data.
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Ecosystem-based
design rules for sand
extraction sites
PhD candidate Maarten de Jong (IMARES)
Dr. Martin Baptist (IMARES)
Dr. Bas Borsje (Deltares)
Sand extraction on DCS
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Volume (million m3)
Sand extraction on DCS
Other functions Sand extraction
3 Case-studies on DCS
Common shallow sand extraction (2m)
8-m deepened shipping lane
20 m deep Maasvlakte 2 borrow pit
Data on:
Sediment
In- and epifauna
Demersal fish
hydrodynamics
Bed shear stress
Ecology sediment bed shear stress ()
can be calculated and influenced by water depth
(extraction).
Reference
2 m
8 m
20 m
24 m
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Tide-averaged
τ
(N m-2)
Extraction depth (m)
τ
- extraction depth
2DH quadratic friction law:
τ
 =
  
τ
 = 
τ - depth - ecology
Ecological data
8 m
20 m
2 m
24 m
τ - depth - ecology
2 m 8 m
20 m 24 m
Generic ecosystem-based design rules
To reproduce τ values and related ecological response for other
areas with water depths and or flow velocities
8 m
20 m
2 m
24 m
Come see my poster!
... Impacts of sand mining include loss of species, loss or degradation of habitats, and social conflict, and the local scarcity of certain types of sand is driving an extensive, and often illegal or unregulated, trade. However, opportunities for restoration after mining and the ecosystem-based design of mining sites are emerging (e.g., [32]). Alternatives, such as the use of desert sand, previously deemed to have little economic value or potential [33], use of mud for land reclamation, or recycling of construction material, are also being explored. ...
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Full-text available
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