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A Commodified World? Mapping the Limits of Capitalism

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... Böhm et al. 2010;Davies et al., 2005;Feigenbaum et al. 2014;Maeckelbergh 2009;, workers cooperatives and self-organisation (e.g. Atzeni and Ghigliani, 2007;Atzeni and Vieta, 2014;Cheney, 1999;Webb and Cheney 2014), non-commodified work practices (Williams, 2005;, leadership (Western, 2013) and the commons (De Angelis and Harvie, 2014;Fournier, 2013), the purpose of this special issue is to hone in on specifically anarchist contributions to these debates and others. In terms of CMS, the anarchist seeds are indeed few and far between. ...
... Our approach acknowledges the diverse work that shows how a critical part of the capitalist narrative is to make invisible and silent those practices of cooperation, care and exchange that happen simultaneously to capitalist practices (White and Williams, 2014). Such practices evidence a pluriverse of alternatives to the economic system of commodification, growth and dispossession and delegitimise the narrative of capitalism as the only possible effective economic system (Williams, 2005). ...
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Purpose The purpose of this paper is to uncover the ways in which companies either reproduce or challenge the growth-based roots of the social imaginary, in order to inform the degrowth debate at the firm level. Design/methodology/approach This paper offers an epistemic analysis of the ways companies organise, revealing underlying conceptions of organisations' identities and their corresponding ways of organising. Findings The epistemic analysis derives four conceptual findings allowing the authors to suggest ways of organising in a socio-environmental future not driven by economic growth. The paper suggests new research avenues to study alternative worldviews in organisations. Originality/value This paper creatively contributes to the discussion about alternatives to the current unsustainable economy with a special focus on the micro level, where businesses act as a vital driving force for economic growth.
... An alternative economy founded on the concern for human development that values the diversity of mankind is advocated by Fisher and Ponniah (2003). Alternative economies represent a necessary portion of "cultures of resistance" to the growing consumerism in today's world (Campana et al., 2017;Williams, 2005). Actors engaged in such activities manage transactions (with monetary transactions or through barter) and create value (Haase et al., 2017). ...
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Researchers have emphasized the significance of the alternative economy. Inferences from past studies, and the suggestions on the characteristics of alternative economic networks, are manifested in studies concerning multiple disciplines. The present study explores the definitional aspects and facets of alternative economic networks. The analysis of a wide range of literature, sampled in the present study, employed a disciplined literature discovery process with Max Qualitative Data Analysis software to produce a tabulation of characteristics of "alternative economy"/"community economy"/"social economy." Furthermore, these characteristics were studied through a statistical content analysis of relevant literature, and an importance-based classification of the characteristics was developed. Principal components analysis was used to distinguish thematic clusters within extant literature. These principal components were used to construct a definition of an alternative economy. The present study subsequently analyzed the temporal evolution of the possible characteristics of the alternative economy as proposed by scholars. The facets of alternative economy, thus identified, may be utilized for supplementary empirical studies in the context of alternative economic networks.
... When these (and other) alternatives to capitalism are extended to alternatives to neoliberal conservation, one can take further inspiration from the many debates that explicitly link capitalism and ecology. These, too, are very diverse and range from radical Marxist socialism (Williams 2010;Magdoff and Bellamy Foster 2011), strategies for economic "degrowth" (Kallis 2011), anarchist geographies , and less radical "steady state economics" (Dietz and O'Neill 2013;Czech 2013) to "bioregional" economies (Scott Cato 2012). Moreover, there are calls for "living with" biodiversity (Turnhout et al. 2013) and emphases on affective hope and ways of relating with nonhumans that are different from the destructive capitalist ratio (Sullivan, this volume;Singh 2013). ...
... A történelem folyamán mindenütt és minden korban létezett, sőt a fordista termelési paradigma illetve a totális (a diktatorikus és a jóléti) állam kialakulása előtt a gazdasági élet uralkodó formája volt (Carpi 2008). A közösségi gazdaságot a témával foglalkozó szakirodalom szociális gazdaságnak (Amin et al 2002), esetenként pedig informális gazdaságnak (Williams 2004) is nevezi. A közösségi vállalkozásokra általánosan jellemző, hogy magánkézben vannak, tagjai önként léptek be, közösségi céljaik prioritást élveznek a profitmaximalizálással szemben, szervezetük nem hierarchikus és benne a humán elem dominál, legfontosabb gazdasági céljuk pedig a tagok szükségleteinek kielégítése. ...
Technical Report
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Az „emberközpontú” fenntarthatóság szemlélete szerint csak a gazdasági fejlődés bizonyos fokáig jelentkeznek a negatív hatások, és a fejlődés további szakaszaiban a technológiai előrelépésnek köszönhetően a gazdaság fejlődése nem jár majd a környezet romlásával, és növeli a társadalmi jólétet. A tapasztalatok azonban mindezidáig azt mutatják, hogy a világ fejlett országaira jellemző termelési-fogyasztási rendszer egyelőre negatív hatással volt mind a társadalom (növekvő egyenlőtlenség, szegénység), mind a környezet (környezetszennyezés) állapotára. A Nemzeti Fejlesztési Minisztérium megbízásából készítette: Magyar Tudományos Akadémia Regionális Kutatások Központja Alföldi Tudományos Intézet
... Furthermore, as human labor has been visualized as part of production input, smaller wage and unequal distribution of production profit has been disguised as efficient economics, and the result has been manifested in severe inequalities in wealth [4] as well as the practice of discrimination and domination of race and gender [5] or configurative structure of all of the above [6]. Alternatives has been proposed by scholars, such as the idea of encouraging non-monetized exchange by community selfhelp activity and volunteering [7] or providing alternative economic spaces by fostering principles of co-operation, non-profit, socially oriented economics [8]. Generally, there has been acceptance among scholars that to survive the competing environment of capitalistic economics, communities must collect resources and act as a whole rather than as individuals. ...
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This paper is aimed at contextualizing the approach of Community Based Development as an alternative solution of communities to reduce dependency to the outer forces. It is conducted by examining a heavily urbanized area in Central Jakarta and to compare it with different scales of contexts. Kelurahan Cideng has very unique context since its urban environment has particular population composition of the dichotomic extremes: the poor and the rich as well as those involved in formal and informal employment. The study treats a national government’s policy of the integration of Posyandu, BKK and provincial initiative of PAUD as the interplay with the socio-economic context of Cideng.
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die Zeit des Daseins ist unbestimmt, seinen Ort zu wählen aber sind wir weiterhin frei. Er wird durch unseren Ursprunk beeinflußt, aber nicht diktiert. Den rechten Standort finden gehört mit zu einem gelungenen Leben,-aber auch mit zu einer geglückten Unternehmung,…" (Lösch 1962)
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In response to calls by macromarketing scholars, this article introduces transformative branding to demonstrate how branding—a process traditionally conceptualised at the firm level to achieve marketing management outcomes—can contribute to both market and societal systems. We define transformative branding as a dynamic capability deployed by firms as a prosocial process to facilitate stakeholder co-created brand meanings that draw on hybrid market and social logics. We contend that transformative branding encompasses two market-shaping activities, which drive macro-level change according to hybrid logics: (1) leadership i.e., building a vision for transformation and (2) collaborative coupling i.e., implementing transformation with stakeholders. Shaping the market and society in this way creates opportunities for transforming economic, regulatory, socio-cultural, and political environments, whereby transformative branding works to challenge the dominant social paradigm from within the market system. We conclude with a cautionary note about the potential of branding as a force for good.
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Although access to finance has grown rapidly all over the world, largely based on the expansion of the banking sector, informal finance is still common. Rotating savings and credit schemes have been diffused in many countries across the world, including socialist countries, generally stimulated by a lack of access to loans. These schemes are informal (with no formal binding obligations or written rules) and voluntary, and their functioning depends on successful collective action. Although free-riding and other collective action problems would be expected, such cases have been rarely reported. Based on a set of in-depth interviews targeting individuals who were involved in such schemes in four different post-socialist countries, this paper shows an explanation to the question why free-riding was not the dominant strategy. The paper argues that the reputation and other social capital-components coupled with pressuring instruments used for enforcement of socialist ideology have been the key mechanisms that enabled the functioning of the rotating savings and credit schemes. The importance of trust and reputation received a high value in the selection of the schemes’ coordinator, group members and size. These enabled the successful implementation of the rotating savings and credit schemes.