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Effect of turmeric (Curcuma longa) on overweight hyperlipidemic subjects: Double blind study

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Objective: To evaluate the effect of turmeric (Curcuma longa) on serum lipid profile in overweight hyperlipidemic subjects. Methods: This was a double blind randomised control study. The study was conducted in the Department of Medicine, CSM Medical University, Lucknow from July 2010-June 2011. A total of 120 subjects were interviewed using a pre-tested semi-structured schedule whose BMI>25 and total cholestero1>200 mg/dl and/or triglyceride>l50 mgldl, were divided randomly using random number table into 2 groups Group-I (Aquous extract of Turmeric-1.4 gm per day) (n=53) and Group-I1 (Placebo) (n=52) for three months. They were given the same color capsules without revealing their identity, with the instructions to take the contents of each pack twice a day before meal for 90 days. Subjects were asked to give their 12 hour fasting blood samples on 0, 30, 60 and 90 day. The paired t-test was used to compare the changes amongst follow-ups and unpaired t-test was used to compare between groups. p-value<0.05 was considered as significant. Results: At the baseline, both the groups were similar in anthropometric and clinical parameters. Treatment group produced significant (p<0.0001) reduction in lipid profiles such as serum total cholesterol, triglyceride and LDL-cholesterol and VLDL- cholesterol in hypercholesteremic group from 0 day to 30, 60 and 90 day of follow-ups. However, there was no significant change in the placebo group. The percentage reduction was higher in the subjects of Turmeric group as compared to Placebo. Conclusion: Aquous extract of Turmeric has shown lipid lowering properties among overweight hyperlipidemic subjects.
... The effect of curcumin is associated with the chelation of transition metals (iron and copper), resulting in its antioxidant capacity, protecting it from oxidative stress, and resulting in its anti-inflammatory action [96]. Regarding its antiobesogenic effect [97], curcumin can modulate molecular markers in the synthesis of HDL-c [98,99], causing a reduction in total plasma cholesterol levels [100][101][102]; increase the elimination of cholesterol from the diet [100,103] and decrease intestinal cholesterol absorption even in cases of high-fat diets [103,104]; and decrease the attenuation of atherosclerotic lesions for modulating the pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and altering adhesion molecules and MMP gene expression [101]. In addition, curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin can act to inhibit the enzymes acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, serving as potential drugs for Alzheimer's disease, and inhibit the enzyme α-glucosidase, demonstrating antidiabetic activity [105]. ...
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Curcuma longa, a native species to South Asia, is commonly known as turmeric and traditionally used as a spice and dye in culinary preparations and as a traditional herbal medicine. The bioactive compounds of C. longa have different effects such as antioxidant, antitumor, antimicrobial, insecticide, larvicide, repellent, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, healing, and gastroprotective properties. In this chapter, we describe the major chemical compounds present in C. longa and how these compounds demonstrate biological potential in human health. C. longa and its bioactive compounds have important health-promoting effects and have the potential for the development of pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, or food ingredients.
... The effect of curcumin is associated with the chelation of transition metals (iron and copper), resulting in its antioxidant capacity, protecting it from oxidative stress, and resulting in its anti-inflammatory action [96]. Regarding its antiobesogenic effect [97], curcumin can modulate molecular markers in the synthesis of HDL-c [98,99], causing a reduction in total plasma cholesterol levels [100][101][102]; increase the elimination of cholesterol from the diet [100,103] and decrease intestinal cholesterol absorption even in cases of high-fat diets [103,104]; and decrease the attenuation of atherosclerotic lesions for modulating the pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and altering adhesion molecules and MMP gene expression [101]. In addition, curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin can act to inhibit the enzymes acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, serving as potential drugs for Alzheimer's disease, and inhibit the enzyme α-glucosidase, demonstrating antidiabetic activity [105]. ...
... Few adverse events were reported in the curcuminoids group and included hot flashes, headache, skin rash, constipation, nausea, diarrhea, flatulence, abdominal pain, vomiting, feeling cold and bruising (Baum L 2007, Chuengsamarn S 2014, Mirzabeigi P 2015, Mohammadi A 2013, Panahi Y 2014a, Pungcharoenkul K 2011, Rahmani S 2016, Sukandar EY 2013, Usharani P 2008, Yang YS 2014 all of which were of mild intensity and short duration. Only one study reported insufficient information regarding adverse effects (Na LX 2013) though other trials did not provide any safety information (Alwi I 2008, DiSilvestro RA 2012, Funamoto M 2016, Pashine L 2012, Rahimi HR 2016. ...
Article
Objective: The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine and clarify the impact of curcuminoids on serum lipid levels. Methods: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of curcuminoids on plasma lipids were searched in PubMed-Medline, Scopus, Web of Science databases (from inception to April 3rd, 2017). A random-effects model and generic inverse variance method were used for quantitative data synthesis. Sensitivity analysis was conducted using the leave-one-out method. A weighted random-effects meta-regression was performed to evaluate the impact of potential confounders on lipid concentrations. Results: A meta-analysis of 20 RCTs with 1427 participants suggested a significant decrease in plasma concentrations of triglycerides (WMD: -21.36 mg/dL, 95% CI: -32.18, -10.53, p < 0.001), and an elevation in plasma HDL-C levels (WMD: 1.42 mg/dL, 95% CI: 0.03, 2.81, p = 0.046), while plasma levels of LDL-C (WMD: -5.82 mg/dL, 95% CI: -15.80, 4.16, p = 0.253) and total cholesterol (WMD: -9.57 mg/dL, 95% CI: -20.89, 1.75, p = 0.098) were not altered. The effects of curcuminoids on lipids were not found to be dependent on the duration of supplementation. Conclusion: This meta-analysis has shown that curcuminoid therapy significantly reduces plasma triglycerides and increases HDL-C levels.
... Owoce kolendry służą łagodzeniu stanów zapalnych, niestrawności, a także leczeniu biegunek, dny moczanowej, reumatyzmu i zawrotów głowy [74]. [54]. Badania przeprowadzone przez Kima, wykazały, że dzienne spożycie wodno-alkoholowego ekstraktu (w dawce równoważnej 20 mg kurkuminy), przez zdrowe osoby w wieku 27-67 lat, przez 45 dni, doprowadziło do znacznego spadku stężenia nadtlenków lipidów [66]. ...
Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Literature data indicate that, due to these diseases, approximately 17.5 million people died in 2012. Types of cardiovascular disease include ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, congenital heart disease, rheumatic heart disease, cardiomyopathy and arrhythmia. Proper nutrition is an important factor in reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. An interesting element of our diets is spices. For thousands of years, they have been used in the treatment of many diseases: bacterial infections, coughs, colds, and liver diseases. Many studies also demonstrate their antioxidant, chemopreventive, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. This paper focuses on discussing the importance of selected spices (garlic, cinnamon, ginger, coriander and turmeric) in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.
... Clinical study reported that Turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) and Garlic (Allium sativum L.) extracts act as antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic agent in Type-2 diabetes-dyslipidemia patients [77]. Aquous extract of turmeric at the dose of 1.4 gm/day in the form of capsule for three months has shown lipid lowering properties among overweight hyperlipidemic subjects [78]. ...
... 17,18 Turmeric extract when given to hyperlipidemic obese patients, resulted in favorable effect. 19 Another trial reported that 3 months of Turmeric supplementation can decrease proteinuria, hematuria, and systolic blood pressure in patients suffering lupus nephritis 20 whereas another clinical study reported that ingestion of one dose of 6 g Turmeric increased postprandial serum insulin levels, but did not affect plasma glucose levels or glycemic index, in healthy subjects. 21 In view of an emerging concept that herbs constituting combination of bioactive compounds possess ''effect enhancing and/or side-effects neutralizing'' properties, 22 we used the Black seeds and Turmeric in their natural form (powder) rather than their active constituents, shown in our lab recently to have synergistic interaction when used in combination. ...
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To compare the clinical efficacy of Black seeds and Turmeric alone and its co-administration in lower doses among patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Double-blind-randomized-controlled trial. Hijrat colony, Karachi, Pakistan. Apparently healthy males (n=250), who screened positive for MetS, were randomized to either Black seeds (1.5g/day), Turmeric (2.4g/day), its combination (900mg Black seeds and 1.5g Turmeric/day) or placebo for 8 weeks. body-mass-index (BMI), body-fat-percent (BF%), waist-circumference (WC), hip-circumference (HC), blood pressure (BP), lipid-profile (cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and TG), fasting blood glucose (FBG) and c-reactive protein (CRP). At 4 weeks, compared to baseline, Black seed and Turmeric alone showed improvement in BMI, WC and BF%. Combination improved all parameters except HDL-cholesterol with lower FBG and LDL-cholesterol as compared to placebo. At 8 weeks, compared to placebo, Black seeds reduced lipids and FBG, while Turmeric reduced LDL-cholesterol and CRP. Interestingly, combination group with 60% dose of the individual herbs showed an improvement in all parameters from baseline. When compared to placebo, it reduced BF%, FBG, cholesterol, TG, LDL-cholesterol, CRP and raised HDL-cholesterol. Turmeric and Black seeds showed improvement in all parameters of metabolic syndrome, when co-administered at 60% of doses of individual herbs with enhanced efficacy and negligible adverse-effects. The combination of Black seeds and Turmeric can therefore, be recommended with lifestyle modification as a starting point for patients with MetS to halt its future complications and progression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
... 17,18 Turmeric extract when given to hyperlipidemic obese patients, resulted in favorable effect. 19 Another trial reported that 3 months of Turmeric supplementation can decrease proteinuria, hematuria, and systolic blood pressure in patients suffering lupus nephritis 20 whereas another clinical study reported that ingestion of one dose of 6 g Turmeric increased postprandial serum insulin levels, but did not affect plasma glucose levels or glycemic index, in healthy subjects. 21 In view of an emerging concept that herbs constituting combination of bioactive compounds possess ''effect enhancing and/or side-effects neutralizing'' properties, 22 we used the Black seeds and Turmeric in their natural form (powder) rather than their active constituents, shown in our lab recently to have synergistic interaction when used in combination. ...
Article
: Amongst non-communicable diseases, metabolic syndrome (MS), a cluster of metabolic disorders including obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidaemia and hypertension, is highly prevalent in modern society. Its management requires lifestyle modifications and/or the life-long use of multiple medications, hence demanding development of safe alternative remedies. This study is aimed to establish the efficacy of combined use of Black seeds and Turmeric using fructose-fed rat model of MS. The HPLC fingerprints of Turmeric and Black seeds showed the presence of curcumin and thymoquinone, respectively as their major constitutes. Different doses of Black seeds and Turmeric, individually and in combinations were administered to fructose- fed rats up to 6 weeks representing characteristic features of MS. At 3 weeks of the treatment, Black seeds and Turmeric lowered (p <0.01) raised blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol, respectively, while their co-administration reduced (p <0.01) both raised blood pressure and hypertriglyceridemia. At 6 weeks, the co-administration of both herbs, at half the doses of individual herbs, was the most effective (p<0.001) in preventing hypertension, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia and endothelial dysfunction than the individual herbs. This study demonstrates the therapeutic superiority of the combination of Black seeds and Turmeric at low doses over individually tested herbs, in improving features of metabolic syndrome.
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The Turmeric (Curcuma longa) has been analysed for the main phytochemical composition nutrients including mineral, Phenolic compounds, Tannins, Flavonoids, Curcumin‎ in crude plant powder , curcumin‎ in etheric extract and ethanolic extract. The Phytochemical screening of chemical constituents of the plant in different solvents showed that the Turmeric contains : Alkaloids, Flavonoids, Steroids, Carbohydrate, Terpenoids, Tannins, Coumarins, Saponins, Quinones, Proteins and Phenolic compounds .The quantitative contents of phenolic compounds were (±14.5000.70) mg/100gm, Tannins (6.75 ±360.75) mg/100gm, while Flavonoids, Curcumin‎ in crude plant powder, curcumin‎ in etheric and ethanolic extract were [ (0.29±8.873), ) 2.490 (0.098±,)1.150± 0.02) and ‎(24.680±0.13)] % respectively .The moisture, total solid, carbohydrate, crude protein, total fat fibre and ash were found to be equal (6.152±0.27) % , (93.848±0.27) % , (36±8.48) % , (7.737) % , (2.637±0.22) % , (23.280±1.23) % and (8.860±0.03)% respectively .The energy value was (205.881)kcal/100gm with important amount of essential elements (K, Mg, Na, Fe, Ca, Zn, Mn, Cr, Co, Ni and N). The effect of Turmeric powder , Ethereic and Ethanolic extract on the levels of antioxidant parameters , lipid profile and liver function were carried out on experimental female rabbits . The animals were divide into ten groups which include:- -C: As control group treated with H2O2 (0.5)%.to induced oxidative stress. -G1 , G2 , G3: orally treated with (25,50,75) mg/Kg/day of TRP and H2O2 (0.5)%. -G4 , G5 ,G6: orally treated with (2 , 3 , 4) mg/Kg/day of etheric extract and H2O2(0.5)%.. -G7 , G8 ,G9: orally treated with (2 , 3 , 4) mg/Kg/day of ethanolic extract and H2O2(0.5)%.. The results indicated that the levels of GPX , GSH and Albumin were significantly increased in all groups (G1-G9) except G2 in GSH compared to control group (C), while the levels of peroxy nitrate and MDA were significantly decreased in all groups compared to control group (C). The results also indicated that the level of total proteins were significantly increased in all experimental groups except in groups G1,G3 and G6 . Total cholesterol levels were significantly decreased in groups G1 ,G3 ,G4 and G9 in compared to control group. The levels of triglycerides and VLDL were significantly decreased in all experimental groups except groups G3 and G7 ,LDL-C were also significantly decreased in all experimental groups except in G2, In contrast, the levels of HDL-C was significantly increased in all groups except G9 , while in G1 ,G2 and G3 were significantly decreased compared to control group (C). Results of blood glucose showed a significantly decreased in all experimental groups except G1 ,G8 and G9 compared to control group (C). There were also significant decrease in the levels of ALT ,AST and ALP in all groups except group G7 for AST and groups G4 , G6 and G7 for ALP .
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