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Abstract

Background: Proximal osteotomy of the first metatarsal is often indicated for Hallux Valgus correction. Previously recognised complications however, include transfer metatarsalgia, first metatarsophalangeal joint stiffness, problems with fixation and prominence of metalware. Methods: We report on one year follow up of an international prospective series between June 2009 and October 2012 involving three centres, including 91 feet (58 patients) that underwent proximal osteotomy, using a new locking plate applied to the plantar surface of the metatarsal. Results: Mean Hallux Valgus angle improved from 27.9 (±13.1)° to 12.4 (±8.2)° while mean Intermetatarsal angle improved from 12.5 (±8.4) to 7.1 (±3.4) and there was a statistically significant improvement in both mean AOFAS-HMI score 54.2 (±13.9) to 94.0 (±9.5) and Visual Analogue Pain Scale 4.7 (±1.5) to 0.6 (±1.3). 70% of patients were back at their preoperative employment at five weeks. Mean surgical time was 56min and the plate was generally well tolerated. There were five implant related complications. Conclusions: Locked fixation from the tension side of the construct encourages early weight bearing with a low risk of implant prominence. Our radiological, functional and clinical parameters are comparable with similar series and we therefore recommend this technique.

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Article
Severe symptomatic hallux valgus deformities are usually not treatable with conservative methods in the long-term. Surgical treatment currently aims for mechanical restitution of the first ray with preserved mobility of the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP 1) joint and with low risk of recurrence after surgery. Keeping these aims in mind the surgical methods consist of osteotomy at the proximal part of the first metatarsal bone with a high potential for correction of the deformity. Surgical interventions at the midshaft level of the first metatarsal are only useful if the anatomical shape of the metatarsal shows a wide shaft, which allows a large shift in the osteotomy. In all other cases of severe hallux valgus deformity two different surgical principles are currently used and recommended: 1. proximal or basal osteotomy of the first metatarsal bone in all cases with a preserved MTP 1 and tarsometatarsal (TMT-1) joint without signs of instability. 2. Arthrodesis of the TMT-1 joint in all cases of instability or degenerative changes with an intact MTP 1 joint, the so-called Lapidus arthrodesis. This article gives an overview over the most important and widely used surgical techniques for correction of severe hallux valgus deformities. Emphasis is placed on the different osteosynthesis techniques and the recommended postoperative regimens. The advantages and disadvantages of the most frequently employed osteotomy techniques are discussed based on the current literature and the authors own experience.
Article
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Twenty patients underwent 25 basal medial opening wedge osteotomies of the first metatarsal stabilized using a low-profile wedge plate in combination with a distal soft tissue release, distal metatarsal osteotomy and Akin osteotomy as required for correction of a hallux valgus deformity. The mean clinical and radiographic follow-up was 12.2 months. Pre- and post operative radiographs available in 15 cases showed that the median hallux valgus angle (HVA), intermetatarsal angle (IMA) and distal metatarsal articular angle (DMAA) were corrected from 45.5 to 13.1, 17.7 to 9.2 and 243 to 10.0 degrees respectively (p < 0.001). Final radiographic assessment for the whole series showed a median final HVA and IMA of 14.1 and 9.1 respectively. Radiographic union was noted in all but one case which was asymptomatic. One wound infection was treated with oral antibiotics, one hallux varus deformity required soft tissue reconstruction and there was one recurrence. The outcome was reported as good or satisfactory by the patients for 20 of 25 feet. Three patients reported stiffness in the first MTP joint, which improved with joint injection and manipulation. Two plates were removed for prominence. The basal medial opening wedge osteotomy stabilized with a low profile wedge plate was an effective addition for correcting a moderate to severe hallux valgus deformity as part of a double or triple first ray osteotomy.
Article
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This retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the results of the proximal (basal) opening-wedge osteotomy of the first metatarsal for correction of symptomatic hallux valgus deformity, using a low profile plate. The procedure was performed by a single surgeon over an 18-month period. Forty-six patients (64 feet) were treated for symptomatic hallux valgus with an average follow up of 20 months. A proximal opening-wedge osteotomy of the first metatarsal and fixation with a low profile plate in combination with a distal soft tissue release with the same postoperative protocol was used in all the patients. Improvement in the hallux valgus angle (HV) and I---II intermetatarsal angle (IM I---II) as well as the AOFAS forefoot score pre and postoperatively (obtained retrospectively from the medical records), were recorded; in particular, the length of the first metatarsal was noted pre- and postoperatively. The HV and IM I---II angles improved by a mean of 14.7 degrees and 6.4 degrees, respectively. The AOFAS forefoot score improved from a mean of 51.3 to 86.8. The mean increase in the length of the first metatarsal was 2.3 mm. Of the more significant complications, five patients developed a hallux varus (early in the series), one of which was symptomatic, and there was one non-union requiring bone graft. The proximal opening wedge osteotomy of the first metatarsal in combination with a distal soft tissue release and stable fixation of the low profile plate was an effective method for correcting a moderate hallux valgus deformity. Guidance provided by the "First Metatarsal Opening Wedge Angle Reference Chart'' was found to be helpful for the IM I-II angle correction.
Article
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Many surgical procedures have been described for the correction of metatarsus primus varus associated with hallux valgus deformity. The purpose of this study was to present the results of the proximal metatarsal opening wedge (PMOW) osteotomy using the Arthrex LPS(R) first metatarsal system. Eighty-four patients (90 feet) underwent PMOW osteotomy with distal bunionectomy. There were 78 patients (93%) and 84 (93%) feet available for followup. Mean followup was 2.4 (range, 2.0 to 3.2) years from the time of the index surgery. Pre- and postoperative clinical examination, level of activity, patient derived subjective satisfaction score, radiographic measurements, and visual analogue scale (VAS) score for pain were obtained and evaluated retrospectively. The mean preoperative VAS score was 5.9 (+/- 2.2), compared with a mean postoperative score of 0.5 (+/- 0.8). The mean 1-2 IMA preoperatively was 14.5 (+/-3.3) degrees, compared with postoperative measurements of 4.6 (+/- 2.8) degrees. The mean hallux valgus angle (HVA) improved from a mean of 30 (range, 22 to 64) degrees preoperatively to 10 (range, -15 to +18) degrees. The mean time to radiographic union was 5.9 (range, 4 to 14) weeks. There was one nonunion, one delayed union, mild hallux varus in two patients, severe hallux varus in two patients, recurrent hallux valgus in three patients (including the nonunion) and no instances of plate failure there was no significant difference in mean preoperative (74.8 degrees +/- 11) compared to postoperative (67.9 degrees +/- 10) total MTP joint range of motion. Ninety percent of patients reported good to excellent subjective results after the index surgery. We believe PMOW osteotomy was near ideal in terms of reliable, predictable correction and healing. Length of the first metatarsal was maintained and patients ambulated safely in a CAM walking boot immediately after surgery. We believe a first web space release may result in hallux varus and increased distal metatarsal articular angle (DMAA) was associated with hallux valgus recurrence.
Article
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Article
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We prospectively evaluated the results of plantar pressure measurement in 32 patients (43 feet) who had a proximal crescentic osteotomy of the first metatarsal with a modified McBride procedure. The procedure's effectiveness in increasing weightbearing under the first ray, decreasing pressure under the second metatarsal head, and the relationship of radiographic measurements of first metatarsal length and position to postoperative pressure measurements were evaluated. Mean followup was 29 months. Average peak pressure increased postoperatively under the second metatarsal head. Almost identical numbers of feet had first metatarsal elevation (12) or depression (11) greater than 2 mm. Radiographic evidence of first metatarsal elevation, but not shortening, was associated with diminishing peak pressure and pressure-time integral under the first metatarsal head and hallux. Five feet that had first metatarsal elevation greater than 2 mm had new second metatarsal transfer lesions develop. Eleven feet preoperatively and nine feet postoperatively had symptomatic second metatarsal pressure lesions. One lesion persisted, 10 resolved, and eight new lesions developed. Control of the crescentic osteotomy in the sagittal plane was unpredictable despite modification of the surgical technique to plantarly displace the distal segment of the first meta-tarsal. Although average second metatarsal pressure increased postoperatively, there was variability in the correlation of radiographic change and pedobarographic measurements.
Article
The treatment of hallux valgus in patients with pathology of the first tarsometatarsal (TMT I) joint by fusion is an established procedure. Multiple osteosynthesis methods for the fixation of the TMT I joint are available. In comparison to the distal procedures the Lapidus bunionectomy is associated with a pseudarthrosis rate of up to 12% [9-11]. We present results after TMT-I arthrodesis using an interfragmentary screw and a plantar plate compared with an interfragmentary screw and a dorsomedial locking plate. Clinical and radiological examinations were performed preoperatively, six weeks and one year postoperatively. The AOFAS (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society) score and Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAS) were evaluated preoperatively and 12 months after surgery. We observed a significantly increased rate of undesirable effects in mediodorsal plate positioning.
Article
Background: Numerous reconstructive techniques for midfoot collapse secondary to Charcot neuroarthropathy have been described, but few have been studied biomechanically. The purpose of this study was to biomechanically compare 2 of the most common techniques. Methods: Seven paired below-knee specimens were amputated through the talonavicular and calcaneocuboid joints. The nonligamentous soft tissue was stripped proximal to the metatarsal heads and disarticulated through the tarsometatarsal (TMT) joints. For each paired specimen, the TMT joints were fused by plantar plating or intramedullary screw fixation for the contralateral side. The specimens were mounted, loaded, and cycled, and fixation stiffness was determined. Load versus displacement graphs were used to calculate overall construct stiffness, and data were analyzed by Student t tests. Results: There was no failure of hardware. All failures were at the bone-implant interface. Failure was either by screw pull-out, bone fracture, or a combination of the two. There were no notable differences between the 2 fixation techniques with respect to stiffness or loads to failure. There was a trend toward a stiffer first TMT construct using the plantar plating method. Five of the 7 screw fixations failed by pullout of the base of the first metatarsal and the other 2 by pullout of screws from all MT bases. Seven of the 7 plantar plate fixations failed by separation of the fifth to third MT bases originating at the fifth, and 3 showed fracture of the fifth metatarsal base. Conclusions: There was no notable biomechanical difference between the 2 techniques. There was a trend toward a stiffer construct at the first TMT with plantar plating. Clinical relevance: This study biomechanically analyzes two common Charcot midfoot reconstruction techniques and highlights the need for further study of both techniques and combinations of these techniques.
Article
Lapidus arthrodesis with a plate and a compression screw is an established procedure in hallux valgus surgery. The present study was performed to investigate the potential benefit of a compression screw combined with a plantarly applied angle-stable, anatomically precontoured plate or a dorsomedially applied angle-stable plate. In six pairs of human cadaver specimens, one specimen each was randomized to receive a dorsomedial H-shaped plate, while the other received a plantar plate. Bone mineral density was measured with peripheral quantitative computed tomography. The specimens were loaded quasi-statically, followed by cyclic loading. Finally, they were loaded to failure. In the static tests, stiffness and range of motion (ROM) data were obtained. In the cyclic tests, the constructs' displacement was studied. In the load-to-failure test, stiffness and maximum load to failure were measured. The two groups did not differ significantly with regard to BMD (p = 0.25). Any significant differences observed were in favor of the plantar constructs, which had greater initial stiffness (p = 0.028) and final stiffness (p = 0.042), a smaller ROM (p = 0.028), and a greater load to failure (p = 0.043). There was no significant difference regarding displacement (p = 0.14). In the static tests, the plantar angle-stable plate construct was superior to the dorsomedial angle-stable plate construct. Plantar plating appears to offer biomechanical benefit. Clinical studies will be required to show whether this translates into earlier resumption of weightbearing and into lower rates of nonunion.
Article
Osteotomy of the proximal metatarsal for the correction of moderate to severe hallux valgus deformity is commonly performed. The purpose of this study is to review the early results of a technique for the correction of hallux valgus, an opening wedge osteotomy of the proximal first metatarsal with opening wedge plate fixation. A review was performed of the results of 47 patients (49 feet) who underwent correction of hallux valgus with proximal metatarsal opening wedge osteotomy. All osteotomies were secured with plate fixation on the medial side. Evaluation consisted of preoperative and postoperative radiographic as well as clinical evaluations. Mean corrections of 7 degrees were achieved for the 1-2 intermetatarsal angles. Fourteen complications occurred, 6 of which involved mild hardware irritation and did not affect outcome. Four nonunions or delayed unions were identified. The authors find the opening wedge osteotomy of the proximal first metatarsal to be a technically straightforward procedure for correcting moderate to severe hallux valgus. The correction obtained is comparable to other described techniques.
Article
We evaluated the results of 33 feet in 23 patients who underwent a basilar crescentic osteotomy with a modified McBride procedure with a minimum 24-month follow-up. The average hallux valgus improved from 37.5 degrees to 13.8 degrees and the intermetatarsal 1-2 angle from 14.9 degrees to 4.7 degrees. The angle of declination of the first metatarsal was found to have dorsiflexed an average of 6.2 degrees. Unfortunately, osteotomies secured with staples dorsiflexed to a greater degree. Bilateral foot surgery produced results similar to those with unilateral procedures. Four of our patients developed a hallux varus (range 2-8 degrees); however, none were dissatisfied at the time of evaluation. Although this bunion procedure resulted in more prolonged swelling and pain than a distal osteotomy, it should be considered for more complex deformities to avoid the failure that a distal metatarsal osteotomy might produce given a high 1-2 intermetatarsal angle or a high hallux valgus angle.
Article
We retrospectively reviewed the results for seventy-five patients (109 feet) in whom a hallux valgus deformity had been corrected with the release of the distal soft tissues, excision of the medial eminence, plication of the medial part of the capsule, and proximal crescentic osteotomy of the first metatarsal. The patients were followed for an average of thirty-four months (range, twenty-four to fifty-six months). The preoperative hallux valgus angle averaged 31 degrees, and the postoperative angle averaged 9 degrees. The preoperative intermetatarsal angle averaged 14 degrees and the postoperative angle, 6 degrees. Ninety-three per cent of the patients were satisfied with the result of the procedure. They stated that, given the same circumstances, they would have the operation again. The most common complication was hallux varus, which occurred in thirteen feet (nine patients). The other complications included recurrence of the hallux valgus in two feet, pain under a fibular sesamoid in one foot, and a tailor's bunion that was unrelated to the operation in one foot. Only five of forty-eight feet that had had a symptomatic plantar keratosis beneath the second metatarsal head preoperatively remained symptomatic postoperatively.
Article
Proximal metatarsal osteotomies are often performed in patients with hallux valgus and significant metatarsus primus varus. The crescentic osteotomy is popular; however, some authors have reported malunion of the metatarsal shaft caused by dorsal angulation of the osteotomy in a significant number of cases. Recently, proximal transverse “V” osteotomies have been reported to have good results, with rapid healing and no dorsal malunions. We compared the stability of a transverse, proximal “V” osteotomy, using two 0.062-inch K-wires or a 3.5-mm cortical screw for fixation, with that of the proximal crescentic osteotomy, using a 3.5-mm cortical screw fixation. The three osteotomy/fixation techniques were performed on 30 fresh-frozen cadaver feet. The specimens were loaded to failure at the fixation site by applying a load through the plantar surface of the first metatarsal head. Force versus displacement curves were obtained to calculate the failure load and stiffness. Statistical differences among the three groups were determined by the nonparametric Mann-Whitney U-test and the standard t-test. The “V” osteotomy/screw group was more stable than either the “V” osteotomy/pin group or the crescentic osteotomy/screw group. Differences in failure strength between the “V”/screw group and the other two groups were significant at the P < .01 level and the differences in stiffness were significant at the P = .05 level. No statistical differences were found between the “V”/pins and the crescentic/screw groups.
Article
We performed basal chevron metatarsal osteotomy on 32 feet (31 patients) for painful hallux valgus associated with an increased intermetatarsal 1/2 angle (> 12 degrees). Pedobarographic and radiological examinations were done preoperatively and at a minimum of six months postoperatively. The average hallux valgus angle was improved from 40.9 degrees to 19.2 degrees and the intermetatarsal 1/2 angle from 16.5 degrees to 6.8 degrees. The mean angle of declination of the first metatarsal was decreased by 1.4 degrees. The pedobarographs showed a significant reduction in areas sustaining pressure > 5 kg/cm2, an increased total foot contact area and a higher percentage forefoot contact area on heel raise. There was a high level of patient satisfaction with relief of symptoms and improved appearance of the foot.
Article
Fifty-one cases of moderate to severe bunion deformity with hallux valgus and metatarsus primus varus in 43 patients were treated by bunionectomy, proximal Chevron metatarsal osteotomy, lateral capsulotomy, adductor tenotomy, and lashing of first and second metatarsals together. The hallux valgus angle improved an average of 19 degrees from 33 degrees (mean) preoperatively to 14 degrees (mean) postoperatively. The intermetatarsal angle improved an average of 7.3 degrees from an average of 14 degrees preoperatively to an average of 6 degrees postoperatively. The position of the sesamoids was realigned to beneath the first metatarsal head and the metatarsal length remained essentially unchanged. Union occurred in 9 weeks (mean). No malunions occurred. Foot score profiles revealed a significant improvement in subjective evaluation from 69/100 preoperatively to 83/100 postoperatively with respect to pain, deformity, motion, disability, and cosmesis. Seventy-eight percent of patients had a good to excellent result. Improved subjective evaluations indicated that proximal Chevron osteotomy combined with bunionectomy, capsulotomy, tenotomy, and metatarsal lashing provides a reliable method with respect to stability, technical ease, low complication, and satisfactory surgical outcome for correction of moderate and severe bunion deformity, both as a primary and revision procedure.
Article
Proximal crescentic metatarsal osteotomy is a clinically successful technique for correcting metatarsus primus varus in hallux valgus surgery. However, there have been instances of dorsal elevation of the metatarsal head with this technique. Mechanical testing on 10 matched pairs of cadaver feet was performed to evaluate a new technique combining a biplanar closing wedge osteotomy and plantar plate fixation versus crescentic metatarsal osteotomy. The specimens were tested in cantilever-bending mode on an MTS Mini Bionix test frame. The mean load-to-failure values were 127.2 +/- 81.9 N (SD) for biplanar osteotomy with plate fixation and 44.9 +/- 43.3 N for crescentic osteotomy (P = 0.019); the mean stiffness values at the initial portion of the load-deflection curve were 83.11 +/- 73.76 N/mm and 31.95 +/- 43.00 N/mm, respectively (P = 0.012). The biplanar wedge osteotomy with plantar plate fixation demonstrated significantly stronger fixation than the crescentic osteotomy, with higher mean load-to-failure and stiffness values. This newly described technique may provide an acceptable alternative for patients at risk for dorsal elevation of the metatarsal, particularly those who are noncompliant or have osteopenia. Clinical study will determine whether this new technique offers satisfactory long-term results.
Article
To test the hypothesis that a plate applied to the plantar (tension) side of the medial midfoot provides stronger fixation than midfoot fusion with screw fixation, we biomechanically compared the two constructs for midfoot fusion. We created a model of midfoot instability in eight matched pairs of cadaver legs by section of joint capsule, ligaments, and tendons about Lisfranc's joints, and then performed a load-to-failure study to compare the fixation provided by a plantarly applied third tubular plate with that by cortical screws. After an initial load deformation curve to 1000 N was obtained, specimens were cyclically loaded at 200 to 750 N for 3000 cycles and then loaded to failure (screw pullout, fracture, or deformation >3 mm). Comparing the plantar plate and midfoot fusion with screw fixation constructs, a plate applied to the plantar (tension) aspect of the medial midfoot provides a stronger, sturdier construct than does midfoot fusion with screw fixation.
Article
The purpose of this study was to determine the intra-observer and inter-observer reliability of physicians on a repetitive basis in making angular measurements of hallux valgus deformities. The hallux valgus angle, the 1–2 intermetatarsal angle, and the distal metatarsal articular angle and the assessment of congruency/subluxation of the first MTP joint were evaluated on a repetitive basis. Physicians were provided with a series of black and white photographs of radiographs with a hallux valgus deformity. Three different sets of photographs randomly ordered were sent at a minimum interval of six weeks to the participants. Participating physicians were extremely reliable in the measurement of the 1–2 metatarsal angle. 96.7% of the photographs were repeatedly measured within a range of 5 degrees or less. The angular measurements to determine the hallux valgus angle were slightly less reliable, but 86.2% of photos were repeatedly measured within a range of 5 degrees or less. In the measurement of the distal metatarsal articular angle, 58.9% of photographs were repeatedly measured within a range of 5 degrees or less. There was a wide range within physician evaluators who recognized very few congruent joints (2 of 21) and those who recognized several congruent joints (11 of 21). Most physicians appeared to be internally consistent in the assessment of MTP congruency; however, some photographs were much more difficult to assess than others. This study validates the reliability of the measurement of the hallux valgus and the 1–2 metatarsal angle. The inter-observer reliability in the measurement of the distal metatarsal articular angle is questioned.
Article
1. A survey has been made of 518 operations for hallux valgus and hallux rigidus. 2. The methods of critical examination used in this survey are described. 3. The results obtained have led to the formulation of certain views on etiology and modes of treatment. 4. In hallux valgus in the adolescent, operations aimed at correcting the primary deformity are justifiable when correctly performed, though the exact form such operations should take still requires further study. 5. In hallux valgus in the adult, arthroplasty offers a reasonably good solution in the well chosen case, though no one should consider that the results are so good as to make unnecessary any further research in this field. Metatarsal osteotomy has in the adult only a limited sphere of application. 6. In hallux rigidus arthroplasty alone has no place in the treatment of the adult cases showing metatarsus primus elevatus, nor in the adolescent case. The possibilities of other methods of operative treatment, notably osteotomy, are discussed.
Article
Symptomatic large hallux valgus deformities commonly require surgical intervention with a proximal metatarsal osteotomy. A number of fixation methods have been described for proximal chevron osteotomies; one of the most recent is locking plates. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 16 consecutive patients (20 feet) with severe bunion deformities who had locking-plate fixation of proximal chevron osteotomies. Clinical evaluation focused on osteotomy healing, transfer lesions, and hardware-related complications. Preoperative and postoperative radiographic evaluation included the hallux valgus angle (HVA), 1-2 intermetatarsal angle (IMA), medial 1-2 intermetatarsal distance (MIMD; the amount of narrowing of the foot), sesamoid position, first metatarsal elevation, and metatarsal length change. A postoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score was obtained in all patients. The average radiographic improvements were HVA, 16.0 degrees, IMA, 7.6 degrees, and MIMD, 9.0 mm. Sesamoid position improved in 16 of 20 feet. First metatarsal elevation averaged 0.8 degrees, and the average metatarsal shortening was less than 1 mm. The AOFAS score averaged 94.1 points. Two complications were unrelated to plate fixation. The locking plate held alignment and position of the first ray after chevron osteotomy without clinical evidence of transfer lesions or hardware-related symptoms. Locking plates may improve stability of the proximal metatarsal after a chevron osteotomy for correction of hallux valgus.
Article
Metallic implants are often involved in the open reduction and internal fixation of fractures. Open reduction and internal fixation is commonly used in cases of trauma when the bone cannot be healed using external methods such as casting. The locking compression plate combines the conventional screw hole, which uses non-locking screws, with a locking screw hole, which uses locking head screws. This allows for more versatility in the application of the plate. There are many factors which affect the functionality of the plate (e.g., screw placement, screw choice, length of plate, distance from bone, etc.). This paper presents a review of the literature related to the biomechanics of locking compression plates and their use as internal fixators in fracture healing. Furthermore, this paper also addresses the materials used for locking compression plates and their mechanical behavior, parameters that control the overall success, as well as inherent bone quality results.
Article
Distal soft tissue realignment and crescentic metatarsal osteotomy is a popular procedure in the treatment of hallux valgus. The traditional technique of screw fixation for crescentic osteotomy is technically demanding, and the inferior stability of this construct has been described. We evaluated the long-term results of a modified fixation method. Twenty-six patients (32 feet) undergoing this procedure were retrospectively reviewed. Five patients (six feet) were lost to followup. Mean age of the patients was 47 (14 to 74) years. The osteotomy was fixed with a 2.7 mm AO plate. Assessment of clinical and radiographic results was performed at a mean followup of 2.7 (1.3 to 7.2) years and 8.0 (6.1 to 12.0) years, respectively. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score improved from 57.9 to 90.5 at 2.7 years of mean followup, whereas the patient satisfaction rate was 96%. The intermetatarsal angle (IMA) and hallux valgus angle (HVA) improved from the mean preoperative values of 16.1 degrees and 34.2 degrees to 9.5 degrees and 16.3 degrees. At eight years of mean followup, the mean AOFAS score and patient satisfaction rate remained at 88.5% and 92%. The mean IMA and mean HVA were 9.7 degrees and 17.0 degrees. Complications included one case of hallux varus (4%) and two cases of recurrence (8%). The osteotomy achieved union in all cases. Dorsal plate fixation of crescentic metatarsal osteotomy is a technically easier procedure. Equally good results can be achieved when compared with screw fixation methods, and the results can be maintained long-term.