Article

The Integrated Visual and Auditory Continuous Performance Task: Can the symptomatic Comprehension Scale discriminate ADHD? [Poster Abstract]

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Abstract

Objective: The Integrated Visual and Auditory (IVA) continuous performance task (CPT) has adequate reliability and validity, according to the publishers. Reportedly visual and auditory modalities increase diagnostic accuracy of ADHD. According to the IVA manual, the symptomatic Comprehension Scale is “the single most sensitive sub-scale in discriminating ADHD.” However, there is limited support for the sensitivity and specificity of the Comprehension Scale. The present study examined if individuals with ADHD score lower on the Comprehension Scale than those without ADHD. Participants and Methods: IVA Comprehension scores from an archival database were examined for 186 individuals who were referred for a cognitive evaluation. Of those, 158 had complete and valid IVA profiles. 55 of those individuals were diagnosed with ADHD only. 82 had other disorders, such as learning disorder or psychiatric disorder. 28 had comorbid ADHD and another disorder. Results: An independent sample t-test found considerable overlap between the means of the two groups for both visual (M = 77.85, SD = 32.95 and M = 89.75, SD = 27.06), t(102) = 2.61, p< .05 and auditory subscales (M = 75.65, SD= 33.97 and M = 89.26, SD = 25.46), t(54) = 2.31, p< .05. Analysis of sensitivity and specificity revealed that the use of a cutoff score of 75 for classification was the most accurate. Using this cutoff, the sensitivity of the Comprehension Scale of 116 individuals with ADHD with/without other psychiatric disorders was approximately .54 and specificity .20. Around .26 of individuals could not be classified according to the 75 cutoff score due to significant variance in visual and auditory subscales. Conclusions: The Comprehension Scale did not adequately discriminate between individuals with ADHD. Comprehension errors may be reflective of keyADHDsymptomology. However, more research is needed in order to enhance its clinical utility. Future analyses will compare the Comprehension Scale scores separately for those with and without comorbid disorders.

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... It has also been designed on the basis of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (Berginstr€ om, Johansson, Nordstr€ om, & Nordstr€ om, 2015). The test is to diagnose and distinguish between different types of inattention and hyperactivity disorders at the ages above 6 years (Tollander, 2011). Any impulsive behavior in responding to the stimuli presented in the auditory and visual forms is considered to be an inhibition or auditory and visual control. ...
... Sandford, Fine, and Goldman (1995) reported the sensitivity of this test to be 92% and its positive predictive power and negative predictive power to be 89 and 93%, respectively for measuring ADHD. The IVA test has the minimum error rate (7.7%) and its concurrent validity ranges from 90 to 100 as compared to the Continuous performance test (CPT) and the ADHD score scale (Tollander, 2011). Sandford and Turner (2000) used the retest method to measure its reliability and reported the coefficient of 0.75, indicating the good reliability of the test. ...
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