Modern plant systematics

Book · May 2015with 8,254 Reads
DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.4745.6164
Publisher: 978-966-397-276-3
Publisher: Liga-Pres
Abstract
This tutorial contains contemporary data on systematics of living and extinct plants including hornworts, liverworts, mosses, ferns, lycophytes, gymnosperms and flowering plants. Main classifications systems of embryophytes and separated taxonomical groups are represented. Principles and methods of taxonomical investigations, preparing of scientific publications, elaboration of herbarium and fixed material are discussed. The last part of the book covers the special features of flowering plants. The book is intended for young researchers in botany and plant ecology, as well as for senior students of natural faculties.
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