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Coping, social support, biculturalism, and religious coping as moderators of the relationship between occupational stress and depressive affect among Hispanic psychologists

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... Zaobserwowany brak związku między stresem odczuwanym przez nauczycieli religii a stosowaniem przez nich PRC okazuje się zbieżny z wynikami innych autorów, szukających relacji między tym rodzajem strategii zaradczych a stresem doświadczanym przez: duchownych (Horton, 2006), adolescentów (Terreri, Glenwick, 2013) czy dorosłych imigrantów (Da Silva i in., 2017). Na podstawie przeprowadzonej metaanalizy Ano i Vasconcelles (2005) zauważyli, że związek PRC ze stresem jest dostrzegalny dopiero w dłuższej perspektywie czasowej; istnieją jednak badania, w których nie udało się takiego związku potwierdzić (Horton, 2006;Maldonado Feliciano, 2005). Rezultaty badań mogą zatem sugerować, że pozytywne odwołanie do religii w trudnościach chroni nie tyle przed odczuwaniem samego stresu, ile przed jego odległymi następstwami. ...
Article
Zawód nauczyciela jest w dużym stopniu narażony na stres i wypalenie. Według modelu wymagania–zasoby narażeni na wypalenie są szczególnie ci pracownicy, którzy dysponując niskimi zasobami, znajdują się w sytuacji wysokich wymagań. Przedmiotem badań był związek między trzema zmiennymi: religijnymi sposobami radzenia sobie (Brief RCOPE), traktowanymi jako zasoby osobowe, stresem (SSN), wyrażającym wymagania w pracy, i wypaleniem zawodowym (MBI). Badaniami objęto 419 nauczycieli religii. Stwierdzono, że negatywne strategie zaradcze korelują dodatnio z każdym wymiarem wypalenia, pozytywne strategie zaradcze natomiast korelują z wypaleniem ujemnie. Ponadto pozytywne religijne radzenie sobie moderuje relację między stresem a wypaleniem zawodowym w taki sposób, że dodatnia relacja między stresem a wypaleniem jest słabsza, przy większym nasileniu pozytywnych strategii zaradczych.
... Coping is the process of dynamics and cognitive and behavioral response to reduce or resolve psychological crisis. From one hand, religion affects coping behavior and the change of events in the form of management system [13]. The use of other coping strategies facilitates fighting against stressful factors. ...
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Religious coping is one of the methods to cope with stress that has been considered by psychologists during last decades. Therefore, this study was done to study the moderating effect of religious coping in the relationship between hardiness and psychological well-being in students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. This study is an analytical one and of correlation type. Among all students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 352 people were selected as sample through simple random sampling method, and completed Ahvaz Psychological Hardiness Inventory, Pargament's Religious Coping Scale, and Ryff's Psychological Well-being Questionnaire. To analyze the data, descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation test and multiple regression analysis were used. There was a positive significant relationship between hardiness and psychological well-being (P<0.05; r=0.24); there was a negative significant relationship between negative religious coping and psychological well-being (P<0.05; r=0.45); and there was a positive significant correlation between positive religious coping and psychological well-being (P<0.05; r=0.46); and religious coping had a moderating role in the relationship between hardiness and psychological well-being. The findings indicated the importance of religious coping and hardiness in predicting psychological well-being. Therefore, the existence of positive qualities such as positive religious coping and hardiness could improve students' psychological well-being.
... Coping is the process of dynamics and cognitive and behavioral response to reduce or resolve psychological crisis. From one hand, religion affects coping behavior and the change of events in the form of management system [13]. The use of other coping strategies facilitates fighting against stressful factors. ...
... Nos résultats sont concordants avec les études anglo-saxones puisque que les stratégies les plus utilisées par les psychologues sont le soutien social, se divertir, des techniques de résolution de problème et un travail thérapeutique sur soi (Norcross, Prochaska, & DiClimente 1986 ;Guy, Poelstra, & Stark, 1989 ;Cushway & Tyler, 1994, 1996Mahoney, 1997 ;Maldonado Feliciano, 2006 ;Sanzovo & Coelho, 2007). ...
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We focus in this study on strategies used by clinical psychologists to cope with their own or patient psychological distress in the framework of help relationship. A self-administered form was sent to listings of professionals by e-mail. The sample is made of 187 French clinical psychologists. To cope with patients’ suffering, psychologists use mostly avoidance coping style. And the strategies they prefer are “supervision”, “personal therapy” and “speaking with colleagues” (problem focused coping strategies). To cope with their own distress, which has a lot of negative impacts on help relationship, psychologists have most frequently a problem focused coping style but their favourite strategy is to “lighten their schedules”. And almost a quarter of the sample presents a significant level of distress. In conclusion, results show that psychological distress management by psychologists is an important question with a lot of ethical questions.
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The current study was aimed to observe the moderating role of coping strategies in occupational stress and burnout among mental health practitioners. It was also aimed to examine the relationship of demographic factors with occupational stress, burnout and coping strategies. Data was collected from 200 mental health practitioners (clinical psychologists and psychiatrists) from different government and private hospitals and rehabilitation centers situated in different cities of Pakistan. Three scales were used in the research, that is, Mental Health Professional Stress Scale to measure occupational stress, Brief Cope to measure coping strategies and Maslcah Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey to assess burnout. The results indicated that there is a strong positive correlation between occupational stress, burnout and emotion focused coping strategies. The analyses showed that coping strategies did not moderate the relation between occupational stress and burnout. In demographic variables, the variables of age, education, experience and work hours were significant. Younger mental health practitioners scored high on occupational stress, burnout and use of emotion focused coping strategies than older ones. In qualification and experience, less qualified and less experienced practitioners had more occupational stress, burnout and used emotion focused coping strategies than more qualified and more experienced practitioners. Those practitioners whose working hours were less had low occupational stress and burnout and used problem focused coping strategies.
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Career resilience provided a frame for understanding how Licensed Nursing Facility Administrators (LNFAs) sustain role performance and even thrive in stressful skilled nursing facility work environments. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of in-depth interviews with18 LNFAs, averaging 24 years of experience were conducted by a five-member research team. Analysis was informed by evidence-based frameworks for career resilience in the health professions as well as the National Association of Long-Term Care Administrator Boards’ (NAB) five domains of competent administrative practice. Findings included six sources of work stressors and six sources of professional satisfaction. Also, participants identified seven strategic principles and 10 administrative practices for addressing major sources of stress. Recommendations are provided for research and evidence-based application of the career resilience perspective to LNFA practice aimed at reducing role abandonment and energizing the delivery of the quality of care that each resident deserves.
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Little research has investigated factors and mechanisms that contribute to firefighters’ psychological well-being. Because of the high-stress nature and team work format of this profession, firefighters are uniquely well-suited for studying the effects of adult attachment on their well-being. This study tested a conceptual model depicting the relationships of five psychosocial latent variables: (a) attachment anxiety, (b) attachment avoidance, (c) work cohesion, (d) coping, and (e) psychological well-being of firefighters. The sample included 173 professional firefighters recruited from two Midwestern cities. Results suggested that both attachment avoidance and attachment anxiety had significant direct associations with psychological well-being and that coping partially mediated the link between attachment avoidance (but not attachment anxiety) and psychological well-being. Work cohesion did not mediate the relationships between attachment and psychological well-being. However, coping fully mediated the relation of work cohesion and psychological well-being. Findings and implications are discussed based on attachment perspectives within the context of unique characteristics of the firefighter population.
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All health professions face numerous stressors within their clinical practice, including time pressures, workload, multiple roles and emotional issues. Frequent workplace stress can impact on the physical and mental wellbeing of health professionals and result in burnout and, in some cases, traumatic stress-like symptoms. These outcomes can impact not only on the wellbeing of health professionals but also their ability to practise effectively. It is therefore imperative that a preventive approach is adopted. Developing resilience promoting environments within the health professions can be explored as a means to reduce negative, and increase positive, outcomes of stress in health professionals. This literature review seeks to elucidate the processes and characteristics (both individual and contextual) that enhance resilience in the health professions. It explores relevant literature from five health professions (nursing, social work, psychology, counselling and medicine) to identify the individual and contextual resilience enhancing qualities of each profession. Commonalities and differences between the disciplines are identified in order to arrive at a definitive explanation of resilience across health professions. Implications for clinical practice and recommendations for further research are also discussed.
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Distress and professional impairment among psychologists in clinical practice can adversely affect the process of psychotherapy. In this study, 522 practicing psychologists (52.2%) completed a mail survey on distress and impairment. Various life events and work factors were associated with different amounts of distress and impairment, with personal relationship problems and work with difficult clients being particularly troublesome. Respondents who experienced a greater number of life events/work factors also reported greater distress and impairment. Very high positive correlations emerged between distress and impairment for both life events and work factors. Non-work-related activities and periodic vacations were the most frequently reported preventive behaviors.
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In this article, we attempt to distinguish between the properties of moderator and mediator variables at a number of levels. First, we seek to make theorists and researchers aware of the importance of not using the terms moderator and mediator interchangeably by carefully elaborating, both conceptually and strategically, the many ways in which moderators and mediators differ. We then go beyond this largely pedagogical function and delineate the conceptual and strategic implications of making use of such distinctions with regard to a wide range of phenomena, including control and stress, attitudes, and personality traits. We also provide a specific compendium of analytic procedures appropriate for making the most effective use of the moderator and mediator distinction, both separately and in terms of a broader causal system that includes both moderators and mediators. (46 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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Investigated psychologists' ethical beliefs about continued professional practice in psychology when the practitioner is experiencing burnout or impairment. 94 psychologists completed a demographic questionnaire, an attitude survey, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Relationships among Ss' ethical beliefs, professional practices, and measured levels of burnout were examined, and these elements were found to correlate significantly. Results also suggest that psychologists perceive burnout to be a form of impairment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
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The heads of 107 programs in professional psychology certified by the American Psychological Association participated in a questionnaire study designed to learn their views about well-functioning in professional psychologists and what they had done and would like to do, programmatically, to maintain and enhance it. Their responses were compared with those of 339 licensed psychologists in a prior study. Although the 2 groups both assigned high ratings to self-awareness, a balanced lifestyle, relationship with spouse or partner, and personal values, overall the program heads put more emphasis on the didactic-supervisory items, whereas the practitioners emphasized the personal-existential items. Modifications of psychology programs to place well-functioning of students on par with other major purposes are described in detail.
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Workplace health is now recognised as having major legal, financial and efficiency implications for organizations. Psychologists are increasingly called on as consultants or in house facilitators to help design work processes, assess and counsel individuals and advise on change management. The second edition of this handbook offers a comprehensive, authoritative and up-to-date survey of the field with a focus on the applied aspects of work and health psychology. An unrivalled source of knowledge and references in the field, for students and academics, this edition also reflects the need to relate research to effective and realistic interventions in the workplace. Editors are outstanding leaders in their fields Focuses on linking research to practice Over 50% new chapters. New topics include Coping, The Psychological Contract and Health, Assessment and Measurement of Stress and Well-Being, the Effects of Change, and chapters of Conflict and Communication.
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The work of psychologists can be stressful and demanding, which calls for an understanding of how psychologists cope with the stress of their work and how they prevent distress by establishing habits of well-functioning. Previous studies on psychologists' well-functioning and coping behaviors have not considered the role of spiritual practices in the life of the professional. 400 psychologists (69% response rate) returned questionnaires rating their levels of distress, coping behaviors, methods of well-functioning, and religious coping. No overall differences were observed in levels of distress between more religious and less religious psychologists. Spiritual practices, especially attending religious services and prayer/meditation, were among the most frequently endorsed for a religious subset of the sample. Spiritual practices also appear to play an important role in the prevention of distress for religious psychologists, in that spiritual practices appear to be the first line of defense against distress and are considered to play a very important role in functioning well as a professional.
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While recent autobiographical accounts of women psychotherapists with depressive illnesses have provided vivid and compelling portraits of therapists' experiences in therapy (e.g., Jamison, 1995; Manning, 1995), further research is needed to clarify the impact that depression and its treatment have upon both collegial relationships and clinical practice. A subset of the membership of the Association for Women in Psychology (AWP) was surveyed concerning therapists' experiences with depression and its treatment. Of 220 respondents, 76% reported some form of depressive illness. Eighty-five percent of respondents indicated that they participated in personal therapy. When evaluating their clinical work, respondents reported both positive and negative consequences resulting from their depression. While some respondents noted improvement in collegial relationships, many felt judged and avoided.
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The work world is changing, however, the physical overload from lifting weights and manual material handling may not disappear in near future, as the long supply chain necessary for globalized production means that goods are often produced in one country and consumed in another. Besides, with the growth of information technology new overload factors have appeared as work in the compulsory position or monotonous work straining muscles is one-sided. The health complaints at workplaces caused by the physiological stress are often very closely connected with psychological stress. A calculation method for assessment the ergonomics of manual material handling is presented in the study. The questionnaire for assessment of mental strain has been worked out for the study and introduced in different activities. The results show the possibilities to improve the work environment and workers' health through good workplace design.
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The finding that women report and exhibit higher levels of psychological distress than men has puzzled stress researchers for years (Dohrenwend & Dohrenwend, 1976; Gove & Tudor, 1973; Kessler & McRae 1981; Link & Dohrenwend, 1980). Three major explanations have been offered. The methodological artifact explanation suggests that women are socialized to be more expressive and therefore will admit more emotional symptoms than men in response to standard psychological distress scales (e.g., Newmann, 1984). The stress-exposure argument suggests that women face more stressors in general or more severe, persistent stressors than men (e.g., Gove, 1972; Kessler & McLeod, 1984; Aneshensel & Pearlin, 1987). The vulnerability argument suggests that women lack coping resources, such as high self-esteem, a sense of mastery, or appropriate coping strategies for handling the stressors to which they are exposed (Kessler & Essex, 1982; Pearlin & Schooler, 1978; Turner & Noh, 1983).
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This article analyzes data from 80 Latino social workers to demonstrate the effects of their perceptions of agency cultural sophistication on psychological and occupational stress. Perceptions of cultural sophistication had a significant impact in some areas of occupational stress but not in psychological stress. The usefulness of cultural sophistication as an explanatory variable in understanding staff perceptions of occupational and psychological stress in human services organizations is discussed.
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Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess whether Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) scores represent the same underlying construct in randomly selected non-Hispanic White (n= 1,149), U.S.-born Mexican-American (n= 538), and Mexico-born Mexican-American (n = 706) community residents. The factor structure identified in previous studies fit the data well. Although the factor structure was not statistically identical across ethnic and immigration groups, factor loadings were substantively similar in the 3 groups. The exception was sleep disturbance, which loaded primarily on a Somatic factor for U.S.-born Mexican Americans, primarily on a Negative Affect factor for the Mexico-born, and about equally on these 2 factors for non-Hispanic Whites. The results indicate high (but imperfect) conceptual equivalence of the CES-D in these cultural groups.
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Administered the Schedule of Recent Life Events and the Social Readjustment Rating Scale to 157 general practice lawyers. No simple direct correlation was found between Ss' stressful life event levels and their reports of diagnosable illness. There was a significant relationship between stress experience and complaints of strain symptomatology, but this was mediated by 2 stress-resistance resources. In addition to stress levels, increases in strain were significantly determined by the personality characteristic of alienation as opposed to commitment and the use of regressive coping techniques. Social support and exercise did not significantly affect the degree of strain reported. (48 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).