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The creative investigation of brain activity with EEG for gender and left/right-handed differences

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Abstract

This paper studied the differences of gender and left/right-handed groups from a neuroscience perspective through task-related power of alpha power changes during the generation of creative ideas. Aiming to investigate the effects of the differences, it will help understand the specific neural processes for different genders and left/right-handed groups. We used B-Alert X10®; electroencephalography (EEG) system, computed for left and right hemispheres, to determine if EEG metrics differentiated between the gender and left/right-handed groups. This study assessed EEG power spectral density (PSD) while 17 healthy participants worked on the alternative uses (AU) task. The results showed that (1) the creativity level has no relations with the gender; there is no obvious difference between males and females on the process of creative idea generation. (2) The creativity level is high related to the cultivation of innovative ability. There is obvious higher alpha power changes in posterior regions of the right hemisphere compared to the left hemisphere of the brain for high original group, and a stronger task-related alpha synchronization showed in the right hemisphere than that in the left one for the low original group. (3) There is comparatively lower alpha power in parietal region in the left hemisphere than that in the right one for the left-handed participants, and higher alpha power in the frontal region for the left-handed and in parietal region for right-handed participants. The comparison among different genders and left/right-handed participants can help us understand more about the creative thinking manifested in the human brain.

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... A third group of studies demonstrates the absence of differences in creativity considering the genre. In the scientific literature, most studies confirm this aspect, both in the international context (Baquedano & Lizarraga, 2012;Beghetto et al., 2011;Chae, 2003;Chen et al., 2002;Dikici, 2014;Garaigordobil & Berrueco , 2011;Ghayas et al., 2012;Kousoulas, 2010;Leu & Chiu, 2015;Phipps & Prieto, 2015;Raels et al., 2013;Tsai, 2013Tsai, , 2014Xiong et al., 2015) and Brazilian context (Almeida et al., 2013;Cavalcanti, 2009;Filho & Alencar, 2003;Fleith & Alencar, 2012;Matos & Fleith, 2006;Nakano, 2012;Nakano & Brito, 2013;Nakano et al., 2011;Nakano & Castro, 2013;Nakano et al., 2010;Suárez & Wechsler, 2019;Tentes, 2011). ...
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In order to understand trends reported in research carried out about gender differences in creativity, a systematic review of the scientific literature on the electronic databases Scielo, Pepsic, CAPES Periodicals, Academic Search Premier, Academic Search Elite, Redalyc, and MEDLINE Complete was held. The 133 publications analysis showed that the articles were published between 1975 and 2020, most of them of international origin (82.71%). Most studies reported gender differences, with 45.20% in favor of women. Another 23.28% in favor of men, and 31.50%, oscillating according to the content evaluated. There was no consensus on the issue since inconsistent results were found, sometimes indicating the predominance of better results achieved by women, sometimes by men, in the same measures. This finding reinforces the importance that studies of this nature consider the influence of other factors, such as attitudes, motivation, opportunities, and the type of measure used to establish more accurate results.
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... severe illness or death of a first degree relative, moving, etc…..) ( Schoofs and Wolf, 2009), they were left handed, or with uncorrected errors of refraction, they have suffered from endocrine abnormalities (e.g. Cushing syndrome, diabetes mellitus, etc…), they have reported unusual sleep patterns (Knott et al., 2001;Xiong et al., 2015). ...
... Ainda se tomando os resultados do instrumento de criatividade, verificou-se ausência de diferenças entre os gêneros, confirmando resultados semelhantes obtidos por pesquisas internacionais (Krumm, Filipppetti, Lemos, Koval, & Balabanian, 2016;Xiong et al., 2015) e nacionais (Nakano, 2012;Prado, Alencar, & Fleith, 2016). Essa ausência de diferença tem sido explicada a partir do conceito de "androgenia criativa", que defende que os indivíduos, de forma geral, apresentam características criativas semelhantes, escapando ao rígido estereótipo dos papéis em função de gênero (Candeias, 2008). ...
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SZYMANSKI, Heloisa (Org.) A entrevista na pesquisa em educação: a prática reflexiva. 5. ed. Campinas: Autores Associados, 2018.
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Cortical activity in the human electroencephalogram alpha band was measured (by means of an event-related approach) in a pre- and a post-test (with intermediate training) while participants (n = 30) were confronted with divergent thinking tasks. Half of the participants received a divergent thinking training (over a time period of 2 weeks) which was composed of exercises structurally similar to those used in the pre- and post-test. Analyses revealed that the training group displayed higher task-related synchronization of frontal alpha activity (i.e. increases in alpha power from the pre-stimulus reference to the activation interval) than the control group. These findings are in line with the view of frontal alpha synchronization as a selective top-down inhibition process that prevents internal or top-down information processing being disturbed by incoming external input.
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The psychometric assessment of different facets of creative abilities as well as the availability of experimental tasks for the neuroscientific study of creative thinking has replaced the view of creativity as an unsearchable trait. In this article we provide a brief overview of contemporary methodologies used for the operationalization of creative thinking in a neuroscientific context. Empirical studies are reported which measured brain activity (by means of EEG, fMRI, NIRS or PET) during the performance of different experimental tasks. These tasks, along with creative idea generation tasks used in our laboratory, constitute useful tools in uncovering possible brain correlates of creative thinking. Nevertheless, much more work is needed in order to establish reliable and valid measures of creative thinking, in particular measures of novelty or originality of creative insights.
How the Gifted Brain Learns
  • D A Sousa